166

I'm digging into the node 7 async/await feature and keep stumbling across code like this

function getQuote() {
  let quote = "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.";
  return quote;
}

async function main() {
  try {
    var quote = await getQuote();
    console.log(quote);
  } catch (error) {
    console.error(error);
  }
}

main();

This seems to be the only possibility resolve/reject or return/throw with async/await, however, v8 doesn't optimise code within try/catch blocks?!

Are there alternatives?

6
  • What does 'throw after an await isn't successful' mean? If it errors? If it does not return the expected result? You could rethrow in the catch block.
    – DevDig
    Nov 30 '16 at 9:11
  • 1
    afaik v8 do optimize try/catch, a throw statement is the slow one Nov 30 '16 at 9:49
  • 1
    I still dont understand the question. You van use old promise chaining, but I dont think it would be faster. So you are concerned about the performance of try-catch? Then what is it to do with async await? Nov 30 '16 at 9:52
  • Check my answer I tried to get a cleaner approach
    – zardilior
    Jun 13 '19 at 12:51
  • Here you can do this stackoverflow.com/a/61833084/6482248 It looks cleaner May 16 '20 at 7:04
193

Alternatives

An alternative to this:

async function main() {
  try {
    var quote = await getQuote();
    console.log(quote);
  } catch (error) {
    console.error(error);
  }
}

would be something like this, using promises explicitly:

function main() {
  getQuote().then((quote) => {
    console.log(quote);
  }).catch((error) => {
    console.error(error);
  });
}

or something like this, using continuation passing style:

function main() {
  getQuote((error, quote) => {
    if (error) {
      console.error(error);
    } else {
      console.log(quote);
    }
  });
}

Original example

What your original code does is suspend the execution and wait for the promise returned by getQuote() to settle. It then continues the execution and writes the returned value to var quote and then prints it if the promise was resolved, or throws an exception and runs the catch block that prints the error if the promise was rejected.

You can do the same thing using the Promise API directly like in the second example.

Performance

Now, for the performance. Let's test it!

I just wrote this code - f1() gives 1 as a return value, f2() throws 1 as an exception:

function f1() {
  return 1;
}

function f2() {
  throw 1;
}

Now let's call the same code million times, first with f1():

var sum = 0;
for (var i = 0; i < 1e6; i++) {
  try {
    sum += f1();
  } catch (e) {
    sum += e;
  }
}
console.log(sum);

And then let's change f1() to f2():

var sum = 0;
for (var i = 0; i < 1e6; i++) {
  try {
    sum += f2();
  } catch (e) {
    sum += e;
  }
}
console.log(sum);

This is the result I got for f1:

$ time node throw-test.js 
1000000

real    0m0.073s
user    0m0.070s
sys     0m0.004s

This is what I got for f2:

$ time node throw-test.js 
1000000

real    0m0.632s
user    0m0.629s
sys     0m0.004s

It seems that you can do something like 2 million throws a second in one single-threaded process. If you're doing more than that then you may need to worry about it.

Summary

I wouldn't worry about things like that in Node. If things like that get used a lot then it will get optimized eventually by the V8 or SpiderMonkey or Chakra teams and everyone will follow - it's not like it's not optimized as a principle, it's just not a problem.

Even if it isn't optimized then I'd still argue that if you're maxing out your CPU in Node then you should probably write your number crunching in C - that's what the native addons are for, among other things. Or maybe things like node.native would be better suited for the job than Node.js.

I'm wondering what would be a use case that needs throwing so many exceptions. Usually throwing an exception instead of returning a value is, well, an exception.

3
  • I know the code can easily be written with Promises, as mentioned, I've seen it around on various examples, that's why I'm asking. Having a single operation within try/catch might not be an issue, but multiple async/await functions with further application logic might be.
    – Patrick
    Dec 2 '16 at 4:12
  • 5
    @Patrick "might be" and "will be" is a difference between speculation and actually testing. I tested it for a single statement because that is what was in your question but you can easily convert my examples to test for multiple statements. I also provided several other options to write asynchronous code that you also asked about. If it answers your question then you may consider accepting the answer. To sum it up: of course exceptions are slower than returns but their usage should be an exception.
    – rsp
    Mar 14 '17 at 10:42
  • 1
    Throwing an exception is indeed supposed to be an exception. That being said, the code is unoptimised whether you throw an exception or not. The performance hit comes from using try catch, not from throwing an exception. While the numbers are small, it's almost 10 times slower according to your tests, which is not insignificant.
    – Nepoxx
    Sep 5 '17 at 20:46
31

Alternative Similar To Error Handling In Golang

Because async/await uses promises under the hood, you can write a little utility function like this:

export function catchEm(promise) {
  return promise.then(data => [null, data])
    .catch(err => [err]);
}

Then import it whenever you need to catch some errors, and wrap your async function which returns a promise with it.

import catchEm from 'utility';

async performAsyncWork() {
  const [err, data] = await catchEm(asyncFunction(arg1, arg2));
  if (err) {
    // handle errors
  } else {
    // use data
  }
}
5
  • I created an NPM package that does exactly the above - npmjs.com/package/@simmo/task
    – Mike
    Aug 22 '18 at 7:44
  • 3
    @Mike You might be re-inventing the wheel - there's already a popular package that does exactly this: npmjs.com/package/await-to-js Sep 2 '18 at 13:20
  • 2
    golang is not node. Oct 16 '20 at 19:12
  • Ah welcome to StackOverflow where 4 years after the question is asked a response such as, golang is not node floats in. I think the point is you can write a utility function in Node to do what he is asking. It may be in Go but the point is clear. Aug 6 at 18:36
  • @DylanWright The answer isn't even written in Go—it's JavaScript. It's just stating that this is how you'd achieve async logic that's similar to how Go does it. Sep 9 at 19:08
28

An alternative to try-catch block is await-to-js lib. I often use it. For example:

import to from 'await-to-js';

async function main(callback) {
    const [err,quote] = await to(getQuote());
    
    if(err || !quote) return callback(new Error('No Quote found'));

    callback(null,quote);

}

This syntax is much cleaner when compared to try-catch.

2
  • Tried this and loved it. Clean, and readable code at the expense of installing a new module. But if you are planning to write a lot of async functions, I gotta say this is a great addition! Thanks
    – filipbarak
    Mar 1 '18 at 14:41
  • You dont even need to install library. If you look at the source code for it, its literally 1 function. Just copy and paste that function into a utility file in your project and your good to go.
    – iqbal125
    Dec 20 '20 at 21:19
19
async function main() {
  var getQuoteError
  var quote = await getQuote().catch(err => { getQuoteError = err }

  if (getQuoteError) return console.error(err)

  console.log(quote)
}

Alternatively instead of declaring a possible var to hold an error at the top you can do

if (quote instanceof Error) {
  // ...
}

Though that won't work if something like a TypeError or Reference error is thrown. You can ensure it is a regular error though with

async function main() {
  var quote = await getQuote().catch(err => {
    console.error(err)      

    return new Error('Error getting quote')
  })

  if (quote instanceOf Error) return quote // get out of here or do whatever

  console.log(quote)
}

My preference for this is wrapping everything in a big try-catch block where there's multiple promises being created can make it cumbersome to handle the error specifically to the promise that created it. With the alternative being multiple try-catch blocks which I find equally cumbersome

13

A cleaner alternative would be the following:

Due to the fact that every async function is technically a promise

You can add catches to functions when calling them with await

async function a(){
    let error;

    // log the error on the parent
    await b().catch((err)=>console.log('b.failed'))

    // change an error variable
    await c().catch((err)=>{error=true; console.log(err)})

    // return whatever you want
    return error ? d() : null;
}
a().catch(()=>console.log('main program failed'))

No need for try catch, as all promises errors are handled, and you have no code errors, you can omit that in the parent!!

Lets say you are working with mongodb, if there is an error you might prefer to handle it in the function calling it than making wrappers, or using try catches.

4
  • You have 3 functions. One getting values and catching the error, another one you return if there is no error and finally a call to the first function with a callback to check if that one returned an error. All this is solved by a single "promise".then(cb).catch(cb) or trycatch block. May 20 '20 at 15:50
  • @Chiefkoshi As you can see a single catch wouldn't do as the error is being handled different in all three cases. If the first one fails it does return d(), if the second one fails it returns null if the last one fails a different error message is shown. The question asks for handling errors when using await. So that is the answer also. All should execute if any one fails. Try catch blocks would require three of them in this particular example which is not cleaner
    – zardilior
    May 21 '20 at 1:46
  • 2
    The question does not ask for executing after failed promises. Here you wait for B, then run C and return D if they errored. How is this cleaner? C has to wait for B yet they are independent of each other. I dont see a reason for why they would be in A together if they are independent. If they were dependent on each other you'd want to stop execution of C if B fails, the job of .then.catch or try-catch. I assume they return nothing and perform some asynchronous actions completely unrelated to A. Why are they called with async await? May 22 '20 at 18:13
  • The question is pertaining alternatives to try catch blocks to handle errors when using async/await. The example here is to be descriptive and is nothing but an example. It shows individual handling of independent operations in a sequential way which is usually how async/await are used. Why are they called with async await, is just to show how it could be handled. Its descriptive more than justified.
    – zardilior
    May 23 '20 at 17:31
2

I'd like to do this way :)

const sthError = () => Promise.reject('sth error');

const test = opts => {
  return (async () => {

    // do sth
    await sthError();
    return 'ok';

  })().catch(err => {
    console.error(err); // error will be catched there 
  });
};

test().then(ret => {
  console.log(ret);
});

It's similar to handling error with co

const test = opts => {
  return co(function*() {

    // do sth
    yield sthError();
    return 'ok';

  }).catch(err => {
    console.error(err);
  });
};
2
  • Code isn't very clear man, looks interesting though, could you edit?
    – zardilior
    Jun 13 '19 at 14:02
  • It is unfortunate that there is no explanation in this answer because it actually does demonstrate a great way to avoid try-catch'ing every const you assign with await!
    – Jim
    Apr 24 '20 at 18:57
1

catching in this fashion, in my experience, is dangerous. Any error thrown in the entire stack will be caught, not just an error from this promise (which is probably not what you want).

The second argument to a promise is already a rejection/failure callback. It's better and safer to use that instead.

Here's a typescript typesafe one-liner I wrote to handle this:

function wait<R, E>(promise: Promise<R>): [R | null, E | null] {
  return (promise.then((data: R) => [data, null], (err: E) => [null, err]) as any) as [R, E];
}

// Usage
const [currUser, currUserError] = await wait<GetCurrentUser_user, GetCurrentUser_errors>(
  apiClient.getCurrentUser()
);

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