23

I have seen lots of countdown timers in JavaScript and wanted to get one working in React.

I have borrowed this function I found online:

secondsToTime(secs){
    let hours = Math.floor(secs / (60 * 60));

    let divisor_for_minutes = secs % (60 * 60);
    let minutes = Math.floor(divisor_for_minutes / 60);

    let divisor_for_seconds = divisor_for_minutes % 60;
    let seconds = Math.ceil(divisor_for_seconds);

    let obj = {
        "h": hours,
        "m": minutes,
        "s": seconds
    };
    return obj;
  };

And then I have written this code myself

  initiateTimer = () => {
    let timeLeftVar = this.secondsToTime(60);
    this.setState({ timeLeft: timeLeftVar })
  };

  startTimer = () => {
    let interval = setInterval(this.timer, 1000);
    this.setState({ interval: interval });
  };

  timer = () => {
    if (this.state.timeLeft >0){
      this.setState({ timeLeft: this.state.timeLeft -1 });
    }
    else {
      clearInterval(this.state.interval);
      //this.postToSlack();
    }
  };

Currently onclick it will set the time on screen to: Time Remaining: 1 m : 0 s But it does not reduce it to Time Remaining: 0 m : 59 s and then Time Remaining: 0 m : 58 s etc etc

I think I need to call the function again with a different parameter. how can I go about doing this ?

Edit: I forgot to say, I would like the functionality so that I can use seconds to minutes & seconds

  • 1
    One of the React documentation examples is a clock that updates itself, seems like it would be fairly useful... – T.J. Crowder Nov 30 '16 at 10:31
  • @T.J.Crowder it is semi helpful. they are just getting a time though as can return it through componentDidMount whereas I only want to extract seconds and minutes from a starting position.. – The worm Nov 30 '16 at 10:50
  • Perhaps you could put a runnable minimal reproducible example in the question using Stack Snippets, which support React and JSX, so we could see the problem in action. – T.J. Crowder Nov 30 '16 at 10:53
  • @T.J.Crowder finding it very difficult to create one in JSfiddle as I am using many components with many props across many files – The worm Nov 30 '16 at 11:04
  • @T.J.Crowder from the question, what makes sense to you? (to see if I can add more knowledge to things explained less well) – The worm Nov 30 '16 at 11:04
42

You have to setState every second with the seconds remaining (every time the interval is called). Here's an example:

class Example extends React.Component {
  constructor() {
    super();
    this.state = { time: {}, seconds: 5 };
    this.timer = 0;
    this.startTimer = this.startTimer.bind(this);
    this.countDown = this.countDown.bind(this);
  }

  secondsToTime(secs){
    let hours = Math.floor(secs / (60 * 60));

    let divisor_for_minutes = secs % (60 * 60);
    let minutes = Math.floor(divisor_for_minutes / 60);

    let divisor_for_seconds = divisor_for_minutes % 60;
    let seconds = Math.ceil(divisor_for_seconds);

    let obj = {
      "h": hours,
      "m": minutes,
      "s": seconds
    };
    return obj;
  }

  componentDidMount() {
    let timeLeftVar = this.secondsToTime(this.state.seconds);
    this.setState({ time: timeLeftVar });
  }

  startTimer() {
    if (this.timer == 0 && this.state.seconds > 0) {
      this.timer = setInterval(this.countDown, 1000);
    }
  }

  countDown() {
    // Remove one second, set state so a re-render happens.
    let seconds = this.state.seconds - 1;
    this.setState({
      time: this.secondsToTime(seconds),
      seconds: seconds,
    });
    
    // Check if we're at zero.
    if (seconds == 0) { 
      clearInterval(this.timer);
    }
  }

  render() {
    return(
      <div>
        <button onClick={this.startTimer}>Start</button>
        m: {this.state.time.m} s: {this.state.time.s}
      </div>
    );
  }
}

ReactDOM.render(<Example/>, document.getElementById('View'));
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react-dom.min.js"></script>
<div id="View"></div>

  • this looks good.one problem is that it does not stop at 0 and goes to minus though? fix that and I'll accept it ;) – The worm Nov 30 '16 at 11:43
  • 1
    Well it's similar to what you've had in your initial code. Check if there's any seconds left and then do clearInterval. Updated my answer. – Fabian Schultz Nov 30 '16 at 11:51
  • You could also do a lot more optimizations, like resetting the timer, pausing, etc., but the question was targeted at how do count down and reflect that in the render. – Fabian Schultz Nov 30 '16 at 11:57
  • cheers, mine is still going into minus for some weird reason. I even console.logged(seconds) and it showed me it being 0 so will have to debug further – The worm Nov 30 '16 at 12:09
  • 1
    @FabianSchultz your solution was awesome. It was really helpful for me to build my count down timer component and to get started. The code was very clean. Keep up the great work ! – Ravindra Ranwala Apr 26 '17 at 6:53
6

class Example extends React.Component {
  constructor() {
    super();
    this.state = { time: {}, seconds: 5 };
    this.timer = 0;
    this.startTimer = this.startTimer.bind(this);
    this.countDown = this.countDown.bind(this);
  }

  secondsToTime(secs){
    let hours = Math.floor(secs / (60 * 60));

    let divisor_for_minutes = secs % (60 * 60);
    let minutes = Math.floor(divisor_for_minutes / 60);

    let divisor_for_seconds = divisor_for_minutes % 60;
    let seconds = Math.ceil(divisor_for_seconds);

    let obj = {
      "h": hours,
      "m": minutes,
      "s": seconds
    };
    return obj;
  }

  componentDidMount() {
    let timeLeftVar = this.secondsToTime(this.state.seconds);
    this.setState({ time: timeLeftVar });
  }

  startTimer() {
    if (this.timer == 0 && this.state.seconds > 0) {
      this.timer = setInterval(this.countDown, 1000);
    }
  }

  countDown() {
    // Remove one second, set state so a re-render happens.
    let seconds = this.state.seconds - 1;
    this.setState({
      time: this.secondsToTime(seconds),
      seconds: seconds,
    });
    
    // Check if we're at zero.
    if (seconds == 0) { 
      clearInterval(this.timer);
    }
  }

  render() {
    return(
      <div>
        <button onClick={this.startTimer}>Start</button>
        m: {this.state.time.m} s: {this.state.time.s}
      </div>
    );
  }
}

ReactDOM.render(<Example/>, document.getElementById('View'));
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react-dom.min.js"></script>
<div id="View"></div>

1

The problem is in your "this" value. Timer function cannot access the "state" prop because run in a different context. I suggest you to do something like this:

...
startTimer = () => {
  let interval = setInterval(this.timer.bind(this), 1000);
  this.setState({ interval });
};

As you can see I've added a "bind" method to your timer function. This allows the timer, when called, to access the same "this" of your react component (This is the primary problem/improvement when working with javascript in general).

Another option is to use another arrow function:

startTimer = () => {
  let interval = setInterval(() => this.timer(), 1000);
  this.setState({ interval });
};
  • ah yes, I did forget to bind. this doesn't solve my main issue of it no counting down though? – The worm Nov 30 '16 at 10:46
0

The one downside with setInterval is that it can slow down the main thread. You can do a countdown timer using requestAnimationFrame instead to prevent this. For example, this is my generic countdown timer component:

class Timer extends Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props)
    // here, getTimeRemaining is a helper function that returns an 
    // object with { total, seconds, minutes, hours, days }
    this.state = { timeLeft: getTimeRemaining(props.expiresAt) }
  }

  // Wait until the component has mounted to start the animation frame
  componentDidMount() {
    this.start()
  }

  // Clean up by cancelling any animation frame previously scheduled
  componentWillUnmount() {
    this.stop()
  }

  start = () => {
    this.frameId = requestAnimationFrame(this.tick)
  }

  tick = () => {
    const timeLeft = getTimeRemaining(this.props.expiresAt)
    if (timeLeft.total <= 0) {
      this.stop()
      // ...any other actions to do on expiration
    } else {
      this.setState(
        { timeLeft },
        () => this.frameId = requestAnimationFrame(this.tick)
      )
    }
  }

  stop = () => {
    cancelAnimationFrame(this.frameId)
  }

  render() {...}
}
  • 1
    Nice! But I think you could optimize by preventing too many render. You don't have to setState (and rerender) every frame (~30 per sec). You could setState only if timeLeft (in seconds) changes. And maybe use shouldComponentUpdate ? Am I right ? – TeChn4K Jul 20 '18 at 13:32

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