5

Trying to solve a problem in my perl script I finally could break it down to this situation:

my $content = 'test';
if($content =~ m/test/g) {
    print "1\n";
} 
if($content =~ m/test/g) {
    print "2\n";
} 
if($content =~ m/test/g) {
    print "3\n";
} 

Output:

1
3

My real case is just a bit different but at the end it's the same thing: I'm confused why regex 2 isn't matching. Does anyone has an explanation for this? I realized that /g seems to be the reason and of course this is not needed in my example. But (why) is this output normal behaviour?

  • from man perlre: g and c Global matching, and keep the Current position after failed matching. Unlike i, m, s and x, these two flags affect the way the regex is used rather than the regex itself. See "Using regular expressions in Perl" in perlretut for further explanation of the g and c modifiers. – niry Dec 1 '16 at 0:35
7

This is exactly what /g in scalar context is supposed to do.

The first time it matches "test". The second match tries to start matching in the string after where the previous match left off, and fails. The third match then tries again from the beginning of the string (and succeeds) because the second match failed and you didn't also specify /c.

(/c keeps it from restarting at the beginning if a match fails; if your second match was /test/gc, the second and third match would both fail.)

  • I need just brief detail about /c could you please explain. – ssr1012 Dec 1 '16 at 6:26
  • 2
    @ssr1012 c - keep the current position during repeated matching – 123 Dec 1 '16 at 7:54
  • @123: Awesome... – ssr1012 Dec 1 '16 at 10:11
  • I'm not sure where 123's comment comes from. perlop says it a lot more clearly: c Do not reset search position on a failed match when /g is in effect. – ysth Dec 1 '16 at 17:44
7

Generally speaking, if (/.../g) makes no sense and should be replaced with if (/.../)[1].


You wouldn't expect the following to match twice:

my $content = "test";
while ($content =~ /test/g) {
   print(++$i, "\n");
}

So why would you expect the following to match twice:

my $content = "test";
if ($content =~ /test/g) {
   print(++$i, "\n");
}

if ($content =~ /test/g) {
   print(++$i, "\n");
}

They're the same!


Let's imagine $content contains testtest.

  1. The 1st time $content =~ /test/g is evaluated in scalar context,
    it matches the first test.
  2. The 2nd time $content =~ /test/g is evaluated in scalar context,
    it matches the second test.
  3. The 3rd time $content =~ /test/g is evaluated in scalar context,
    it returns false to indicate there are no more matches.
    This also resets the position at which $content future matches will start.
  4. The 4th time $content =~ /test/g is evaluated in scalar context,
    it matches the first test.
  5. ...

  1. There are advanced uses for if (/\G.../gc), but that's different. if (/.../g) only makes sense if you're unrolling a while loop. (e.g. while (1) { ...; last if !/.../g; ... }).
  • @ysth, That's different. I've used if (/\G.../gc), but never even seen if (/.../g) used (correctly). It only make sense if you're unrolling a while loop. (e.g. while (1) { ...; last if !/.../g; } ... }) – ikegami Dec 1 '16 at 17:57
  • Added a note to clarify this in my answer. – ikegami Dec 1 '16 at 18:14

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