5

I am trying to map a ulong to a long (and vice-versa), and a uint to a int (and vice-versa), as shown below - in order to save the values in a MS-SQL-database with signed types integer and biginteger only.

I do this because I have to check (in the database) whether a number (uint, ulong) is within which range in a bunch of uint/ulong ranges (IPs - v4 & v6; actually the ulong is in reality a uint128 composed of two ulongs).

UlongToLong

UIntToInt

Is there a more efficient way to accomplish this than the code I have here:

public static ulong SignedLongToUnsignedLong(long signedLongValue)
{
    ulong backConverted = 0;

    // map ulong to long [ 9223372036854775808 = abs(long.MinValue) ]
    if (signedLongValue < 0)
    {
        // Cannot take abs from MinValue
        backConverted = (ulong)System.Math.Abs(signedLongValue - 1);
        backConverted = 9223372036854775808 - backConverted - 1;
    }
    else
    {
        backConverted = (ulong)signedLongValue;
        backConverted += 9223372036854775808;
    }

    return backConverted;
}


public static long UnsignedLongToSignedLong(ulong unsignedLongValue)
{
    // map ulong to long [ 9223372036854775808 = abs(long.MinValue) ]
    return (long) (unsignedLongValue - 9223372036854775808);
}


public static int UnsignedIntToSignedInt(uint unsignedIntValue)
{
    // map uint to int [ 2147483648 = abs(long.MinValue) ]
    return (int)(unsignedIntValue - 2147483648);
}


public static uint SignedIntToUnsignedInt(int signedIntValue)
{
    uint backConverted = 0;

    // map ulong to long [ 2147483648 = abs(long.MinValue) ]
    if (signedIntValue < 0)
    {
        // Cannot take abs from MinValue
        backConverted = (uint)System.Math.Abs(signedIntValue - 1);
        backConverted = 2147483648 - backConverted - 1;
    }
    else
    {
        backConverted = (uint)signedIntValue;
        backConverted += 2147483648;
    }

    return backConverted;
}


public static void TestLong()
{
    long min_long = -9223372036854775808;
    long max_long = 9223372036854775807;

    ulong min_ulong = ulong.MinValue; // 0
    ulong max_ulong = ulong.MaxValue; // 18446744073709551615  = (2^64)-1

    long dbValueMin = UnsignedLongToSignedLong(min_ulong);
    long dbValueMax = UnsignedLongToSignedLong(max_ulong);


    ulong valueFromDbMin = SignedLongToUnsignedLong(dbValueMin);
    ulong valueFromDbMax = SignedLongToUnsignedLong(dbValueMax);

    System.Console.WriteLine(dbValueMin);
    System.Console.WriteLine(dbValueMax);

    System.Console.WriteLine(valueFromDbMin);
    System.Console.WriteLine(valueFromDbMax);
}


public static void TestInt()
{
    int min_int = -2147483648; // int.MinValue
    int max_int = 2147483647; // int.MaxValue

    uint min_uint= uint.MinValue; // 0
    uint max_uint = uint.MaxValue; // 4294967295 = (2^32)-1


    int dbValueMin = UnsignedIntToSignedInt(min_uint);
    int dbValueMax = UnsignedIntToSignedInt(max_uint);

    uint valueFromDbMin = SignedIntToUnsignedInt(dbValueMin);
    uint valueFromDbMax = SignedIntToUnsignedInt(dbValueMax);

    System.Console.WriteLine(dbValueMin);
    System.Console.WriteLine(dbValueMax);

    System.Console.WriteLine(valueFromDbMin);
    System.Console.WriteLine(valueFromDbMax);
}
7

To map from ulong to long, cast and add long.MinValue. To map from long back to ulong, subtract long.MinValue and cast. In either case, use an unchecked context so that overflow conditions are ignored.

public static long MapUlongToLong(ulong ulongValue)
{
    return unchecked((long)ulongValue + long.MinValue);
}

public static ulong MapLongToUlong(long longValue)
{
    return unchecked((ulong)(longValue - long.MinValue));
}

The logic for uint and int is exactly analogous.

  • Although this is correct. It is "relatively" slow as you still need to do a copy of a long memory field...I would prefer a blitted approach for awesome. – Aron Dec 1 '16 at 5:10
  • IMHO, you can replace + long.MinValue and - long.MinValue with ^ long.MinValue. – user4003407 Dec 1 '16 at 5:25
  • @Aron Both of my methods compile down to just four instructions: load argument, load immediate, add or subtract, return. If one of these method calls is inlined, that becomes just two instructions in the best case. Do you have a solution that uses fewer than two instructions? – Tanner Swett Dec 1 '16 at 5:42
  • @TannerSwett Yes. The solution with overlapping fields does the conversion with zero instructions. – Aron Dec 1 '16 at 5:58
  • @Aron But you left out the part where long.MinValue is added or subtracted (or xored) in order to preserve ordering. – Tanner Swett Dec 1 '16 at 6:39
1

Necromancing.
Generic answer based on the answer of Tanner Swett:

private static class Number<T>
{

    private static object GetConstValue(System.Type t, string propertyName)
    {
        System.Reflection.FieldInfo pi = t.GetField(propertyName, System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Static
            | System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Public
            | System.Reflection.BindingFlags.NonPublic
            );

        return pi.GetValue(null);
    }

    private static T GetMinValue<T>()
    {
        return (T)GetConstValue(typeof(T), "MinValue");
    }

    private static T GetMaxValue<T>()
    {
        return (T)GetConstValue(typeof(T), "MaxValue");
    }


    private static System.Func<T, T, T> CompileAdd<T>()
    {
        // Declare the parameters
        System.Linq.Expressions.ParameterExpression paramA =
            System.Linq.Expressions.Expression.Parameter(typeof(T), "a");

        System.Linq.Expressions.ParameterExpression paramB =
            System.Linq.Expressions.Expression.Parameter(typeof(T), "b");

        // Add the parameters
        System.Linq.Expressions.BinaryExpression body =
            System.Linq.Expressions.Expression.Add(paramA, paramB);

        // Compile it
        System.Func<T, T, T> add =
            System.Linq.Expressions.Expression.Lambda<System.Func<T, T, T>>
            (body, paramA, paramB).Compile();

        return add;
    }


    private static System.Func<T, T, T> CompileSubtract<T>()
    {
        // Declare the parameters
        System.Linq.Expressions.ParameterExpression paramA =
            System.Linq.Expressions.Expression.Parameter(typeof(T), "a");

        System.Linq.Expressions.ParameterExpression paramB =
            System.Linq.Expressions.Expression.Parameter(typeof(T), "b");

        // Subtract the parameters
        System.Linq.Expressions.BinaryExpression body =
            System.Linq.Expressions.Expression.Subtract(paramA, paramB);

        // Compile it
        System.Func<T, T, T> subtract =
            System.Linq.Expressions.Expression.Lambda<System.Func<T, T, T>>
            (body, paramA, paramB).Compile();

        return subtract;
    }

    public static T MinValue = GetMinValue<T>();
    public static T MaxValue = GetMaxValue<T>();
    public static System.Func<T, T, T> Add = CompileAdd<T>();
    public static System.Func<T, T, T> Subtract = CompileSubtract<T>();
}



public static TSigned MapUnsignedToSigned<TUnsigned, TSigned>(TUnsigned ulongValue)
{
    TSigned signed = default(TSigned);
    unchecked
    {
        signed = Number<TSigned>.Add((TSigned)(dynamic)ulongValue, Number<TSigned>.MinValue);
    }

    return signed;
}


public static TUnsigned MapSignedToUnsigned<TSigned, TUnsigned>(TSigned longValue)
{
    TUnsigned unsigned = default(TUnsigned);
    unchecked
    {
        unsigned = (TUnsigned)(dynamic) Number<TSigned>
            .Subtract(longValue, Number<TSigned>.MinValue);
    }

    return unsigned;
}

equivalent:

// return MapUnsignedToSigned<ulong, long>(ulongValue);
private static long MapULongToLong(ulong ulongValue)
{
    return unchecked((long)ulongValue + long.MinValue);
}


// return MapSignedToUnsigned<long, ulong>(longValue);
private static ulong MapLongToUlong(long longValue)
{
    return unchecked((ulong)(longValue - long.MinValue));
}
-1

Althought Tanner Swett is correct. A much nicer and dirty solution is to tell .net to map access for a ulong to the same memory address as a long. This will give you instantaneous conversion speed.

void Main()
{
    var foo = new Foo { Long = -1 };

    Console.WriteLine(foo.ULong);
}

// Define other methods and classes here
[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Explicit)]
public class Foo
{
    [FieldOffset(0)]
    private ulong _ulong;

    [FieldOffset(0)]
    private long _long;

    public long Long
    {
        get { return _long; }
        set { _long = value; }
    }

    public ulong ULong
    {
        get { return _ulong; }
        set { _ulong = value; }
    }
}

By setting your entity framework POCO to use the attributes shown, you can control the memory addresses that the fields are mapped to.

Therefore, no conversion ever occurs.

This code is 100% faster than Tanner Swett's.

  • 2
    But your code does not map values as OP want. Also, AFAIK, overlapped fields required that your code was loaded with full trust privileges. – user4003407 Dec 1 '16 at 5:19
  • 2
    Can you provide some sort of source for the fact that my code will spend time converting? Since the CPU doesn't store signed and unsigned values differently, I would expect my (long) and (ulong) casts to turn into nothing at all once they've been compiled into machine code. – Tanner Swett Dec 1 '16 at 5:21
  • Agree with @TannerSwett, unchecked conversion long to ulong is essentially no-op in MSIL. – user4003407 Dec 1 '16 at 5:28
  • @TannerSwett You are correct. unchecked conversion of long to ulong is a no-op. But the assignment is not a no-op. – Aron Dec 1 '16 at 5:55
  • 4
    @Aron: I laughed out loud when, in the middle of this discussion of how to shave nanoseconds off the execution time, you said "then save the POCO straight to EF". I'm sure it was a throwaway comment, since if EF really was in the mix, you'd have bigger fish to fry :-) – Gary McGill Dec 1 '16 at 9:42

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