0

I wanna ask how it can not get integer from a string

for example, here are my code:

int main() {
    char str[] = "ababbababa-1998";
    int nr = atoi(str);
    printf("%d\n", nr);
    return (EXIT_SUCCESS);
}

when running, it print out 0 but not 1998, how can I fix it ?

  • you can calculate it using the ASCII number – Denis Dec 1 '16 at 4:33
  • No, i want to put 1998 to the nr variable, not get a single character and convert – STEPHEN bui Dec 1 '16 at 4:36
  • You can store all the numbers in a char[] and then convert it into an integer. – Denis Dec 1 '16 at 4:37
  • 2
    If string format is fixed (like, "some_string-sume_number"), then you can use sscanf(string, "%s-%d", temp_str, &nr)); – MayurK Dec 1 '16 at 4:57
  • yes, but it could cause error format – STEPHEN bui Dec 1 '16 at 5:27
1

In your case you can use strtok.

int main() {
    char str[] = "ababbababa-1998";
    char * const first_part = strtok(str, "-");
    if (first_part == NULL) {
        return 1;
    }
    char * const second_part = strtok(NULL, "-");
    if (second_part == NULL) {
        return 1;
    }
    int nr = atoi(second_part);
    printf("%d\n", nr);
    return 0;
}

You can look at Why is there no strtoi in stdlib.h? for error check atoi.

  • Is your strtok(str) usage valid? – MayurK Dec 1 '16 at 4:53
  • Wouldn't it be more robust to just go through the string looking for the first digit rather than relying on strtok? – John3136 Dec 1 '16 at 4:54
  • @MayurK yep I totally forget the delimiter – Stargateur Dec 1 '16 at 4:55
  • @John3136 if there is a digit in the string before "-", that will fail. I choice strtok to show him a very simple way to do a parser. – Stargateur Dec 1 '16 at 4:58
  • 1
    @Stargateur Not enough info has been provided for either of us to know we're right. – John3136 Dec 1 '16 at 5:16
1

Keep walking down str() until code finds something numeric using strtol().

int main() {
    char str[] = "ababbababa-1998";
    char *p = str; 

    char *endptr;
    while (*p) {
      long number = strtol(p, &endptr, 10);
      // Was conversion successful?
      if (endptr != p) {
        printf("%ld\n", number);
        return EXIT_SUCCESS;
      }
      p++;
    }
    puts("No conversion");
    return EXIT_FAILURE;
}
0
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <ctype.h>

#define ASCII '0'

int
main(void) {
    char const str[] = "ababbababa-1998";
    int i, result = 0;

    for (i = 0; str[i]; i++) {
        if (isdigit(str[i])) {
            result *= 10;
            result += str[i] - ASCII;
        }
    }

    printf("number = %d\n", result);

    return 0;
}
  • It may be worth using a larger INITSIZE (e.g. 128, 256, etc..) and use a static buffer to avoid the malloc, realloc overhead. (there isn't anything wrong with dynamic allocation, it just adds overhead and complexity). You may also want to stop adding to nr after you have found digits, and then find a subsequent non-digit. (e.g. if you had a string "aaaaa-1998aaaaa-1999") You could use a simple flag for that purpose. Just thoughts, not criticisms. – David C. Rankin Dec 1 '16 at 5:03
  • Yeah thanks for suggestion @DavidC.Rankin, I think this approach is too complicated. I will edit my answer. – RoadRunner Dec 1 '16 at 5:04
  • Copy most of the string just to convert it to a number? Rubbish! if (isdigit(array[i]) { total *= 10; total += array[i]; } – John3136 Dec 1 '16 at 5:19
  • Changed it @John3136. I overlooked this simple approach, cheers. – RoadRunner Dec 1 '16 at 5:34
  • 1
    Obviously that should be total += array[i] - '0'; - Just notcied you already did that. – John3136 Dec 1 '16 at 8:20
0

If you want to extract all the numeric digits from a string you could use this function I created.

You will need these header files for this function to work.

#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
void getNumbers(char data[]) {
   int index = 0;
   char current;

   for( int i = 0; i < strlen(data); ++i ) {
      current = data[i];
      if (current >= 48 && current <= 57) {
         data[index++] = current;
      }
   }
    data[index] = '\0';
}

You can use the above function like this.


char foobar[] = "1A2B3C4D5E6F7G8H9I";

getNumbers(foobar);

printf("%s", foobar);

The above code will output 123456789

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