Suppose I have the following code in C++:

#include <memory>
#include <iostream>

struct Some {
        Some(int _a) : a(_a) {}
        int a;
};

int main() {
        Some some(5);

        std::unique_ptr<Some> p1 = std::make_unique<Some>(some);
        std::unique_ptr<Some> p2 = std::make_unique<Some>(some);

        std::cout << p1->a << " " << p2->a << std::endl;
        return 0;
}

As I understand, unique pointers are used to guarantee that resources are not shared. But in this case both p1 and p2 point to the same instance some.

Please unveil the situation.

  • 1
    Your situation would have been easy to diagnose if you had printed the pointer values themselves rather than the a field of the pointees. Or it you had made a "loud" copy constructor. Also, your most basic error was probably to think make_unique erects a pointer to a given object (here the local variable some); this is not what it does, or is for. – Marc van Leeuwen Dec 2 '16 at 6:07
  • 2
    I'm utterly astonished that this poor post got so many upvotes. What's wrong with SO? – Walter Dec 2 '16 at 10:40
up vote 26 down vote accepted

They don't point to the same resource, they each point to a different copy of it. You can illustrate it by deleting the copy constructor to see the error:

#include <memory>
#include <iostream>

struct Some {
        Some(int _a) : a(_a) {}
        Some(Some const&) = delete;
        int a;
};

int main() {
        Some some(5);

        std::unique_ptr<Some> p1 = std::make_unique<Some>(some); //error here
        std::unique_ptr<Some> p2 = std::make_unique<Some>(some);

        std::cout << p1->a << " " << p2->a << std::endl;
        return 0;
}
  • 4
    It's worth pointing out though that unique_ptr has no means of enforcing unique ownership. A careless programmer may easily share ownership of the same object between two distinct unique_ptrs, which will most likely result in undefined behavior at runtime. – ComicSansMS Dec 1 '16 at 13:43
  • @ComicSansMS, you are 100% correct. But I'm ambivalent about adding an example the shows how it can be done... – StoryTeller Dec 1 '16 at 13:44
  • 6
    I tend to agree. No need to show people how to blow their own legs off. – ComicSansMS Dec 1 '16 at 13:45
  • 1
    @ComicSansMS: That's a good reason to enforce the practice of only creating unique_ptrs with std::make_unique. – zindorsky Dec 1 '16 at 19:00

std::make_unique creates objects, calling constructor with specified arguments.

You passed Some& as parameter, and here copy constructor was invoked, and new object constructed.

So, p1 and p2 are 2 absolutely different pointers, but constructed from same object, using copy constructor

both p1 and p2 point to the same instance some

No, they don't.

#include <memory>
#include <iostream>

struct Some {
        Some(int _a) : a(_a) {}
        int a;
};

int main() {
        Some some(5);

        std::unique_ptr<Some> p1 = std::make_unique<Some>(some);
        std::unique_ptr<Some> p2 = std::make_unique<Some>(some);

        std::cout << p1->a << " " << p2->a << std::endl;
        p1->a = 42;
        std::cout << p1->a << " " << p2->a << std::endl;
        return 0;
}

output:

5 5
42 5

To test whether two pointers point to the same object instance, you should compare the locations they point to, instead of the object member variables:

std::cout << &(*p1) << " " << &(*p2) << std::endl;

Which will show that they indeed do not point to the same instance.

ADDENDUM: As pointed out by Remy Lebeau, since C++11 it is advisable to use the std::addressof function for this purpose, which obtains the actual address of an object even if the & operator is overloaded:

std::cout << std::addressof(*p1) << " " << std::addressof(*p2) << std::endl;
  • 2
    This code would fail if the class implements a custom operator&. That is what std::addressof() was introduced to solve: std::cout << std::addressof(*p1) << " " << std::addressof(*p2) << std::endl; – Remy Lebeau Dec 2 '16 at 1:37
  • You are right, thank you. For the given example, it isn't necessary, but it certainly makes sense to use it anyway. I added it to the answer. – Meyer Dec 2 '16 at 10:39

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