83

Normally when a dataframe undergoes a reset_index() the new column is assigned the name index or level_i depending on the level.

Is it possible to assign the new column a name?

0
109

You can call rename on the returned df from reset_index:

In [145]:
# create a df
df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.randn(5,3))
df

Out[145]:
          0         1         2
0 -2.845811 -0.182439 -0.526785
1 -0.112547  0.661461  0.558452
2  0.587060 -1.232262 -0.997973
3 -1.009378 -0.062442  0.125875
4 -1.129376  3.282447 -0.403731

Set the index name

In [146]:    
df.index = df.index.set_names(['foo'])
df

Out[146]:
            0         1         2
foo                              
0   -2.845811 -0.182439 -0.526785
1   -0.112547  0.661461  0.558452
2    0.587060 -1.232262 -0.997973
3   -1.009378 -0.062442  0.125875
4   -1.129376  3.282447 -0.403731

call reset_index and chain with rename:

In [147]:
df.reset_index().rename(columns={df.index.name:'bar'})

Out[147]:
   bar         0         1         2
0    0 -2.845811 -0.182439 -0.526785
1    1 -0.112547  0.661461  0.558452
2    2  0.587060 -1.232262 -0.997973
3    3 -1.009378 -0.062442  0.125875
4    4 -1.129376  3.282447 -0.403731

Thanks to @ayhan

alternatively you can use rename_axis to rename the index prior to reset_index:

In [149]:
df.rename_axis('bar').reset_index()

Out[149]:
   bar         0         1         2
0    0 -2.845811 -0.182439 -0.526785
1    1 -0.112547  0.661461  0.558452
2    2  0.587060 -1.232262 -0.997973
3    3 -1.009378 -0.062442  0.125875
4    4 -1.129376  3.282447 -0.403731

or just overwrite the index name directly first:

df.index.name = 'bar'

and then call reset_index

2
  • 2
    The part after "alternatively you can" works for me, the method before it does not seem to (it doesn't rename the old column, keeps it as "index"). – zabop Aug 21 '20 at 8:58
  • @Edchum apparently this hasnt been working in my case, perhaps because when you reset_index , the old column is automatically named index. Now using df.index would point to the new index created, and df['index'] would refer to the old column. Using df.index.name would try and rename the new column instead of the old column naming "index". I scratched my head around this problem for quite some time when using this method didnt produce the same results as they did for your case, resolved the issue by using igorkf's solution – Sereph Jul 10 at 14:19
27

For a Series you can specify the name directly. E.g.:

>>> df.groupby('s1').size().reset_index(name='new_name')
  s1  new_name
0  b         1
1  r         1
2  s         1
0
25

You could do this (Jan of 2020):

df = df.reset_index().rename(columns={'index': 'bar'})
print(df)
   bar         0         1         2
0    0 -2.845811 -0.182439 -0.526785
1    1 -0.112547  0.661461  0.558452
2    2  0.587060 -1.232262 -0.997973
3    3 -1.009378 -0.062442  0.125875
4    4 -1.129376  3.282447 -0.403731
1
  • 1
    works like a charm! – doomdaam Jun 10 at 20:24
1

If you're using reset_index() to go from a Series to a DataFrame you can name the column like this

my_series.rename('Example').reset_index()

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