130

This is likely a a novice question, but google surprisingly did not provide an answer.

I have this rather artificial method

T HowToCast<T>(T t)
{
    if (typeof(T) == typeof(string))
    {
        T newT1 = "some text";
        T newT2 = (string)t;
    }

    return t;
}

Coming from a C++ background I have expected this to work. However, it fails to compile with "Cannot implicitly convert type 'T' to string" and "Cannot convert type 'T' to string" for both of the above assignments.

I am either doing something conceptually wrong or just have the wrong syntax. Please help me sort this one out.

Thank you!

  • 14
    IMO, if you're checking types in your generics code, then generics probably aren't the correct solution to your problem. – Austin Salonen Nov 3 '10 at 23:07
  • The expression typeof(T) == typeof(string) is resolved at runtime, not compile-time. Thus the following line in the block is invalid. – Steve Guidi Nov 3 '10 at 23:11
  • 8
    (T)Convert.ChangeType(newT1, typeof(T)) – vsapiha Oct 4 '12 at 12:37
  • 2
    @vsapiha, Only works if the object implement IConvertible. Sweetness if it does though. – ouflak Aug 17 '17 at 15:50
262

Even though it's inside of an if block, the compiler doesn't know that T is string.
Therefore, it doesn't let you cast. (For the same reason that you cannot cast DateTime to string)

You need to cast to object, (which any T can cast to), and from there to string (since object can be cast to string).
For example:

T newT1 = (T)(object)"some text";
string newT2 = (string)(object)t;
  • 2
    This works! I am guessing the second like should also be T newT2 = (T)(object)t; although that's a no op. – Alex Nov 3 '10 at 22:59
  • 2
    Addition: C++ templates are essentially cut-and-paste at compile time with the correct values substituted. In C# the actual generic template (not an "instantiation" of it) exists after compilation and thus must (pardon the pun) be generic across the specified type bounds. – user166390 Nov 3 '10 at 23:03
  • (string)(object)t; does nothing here though, might as well leave that out, the (string)(object) that is – Doggett Nov 3 '10 at 23:11
  • 4
    Why not just cast using "as string"? For example, this compiles fine (I literally just compiled it without errors) when userDefinedValue is of type T: var isBlank = (userDefinedValue is string) && String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(userDefinedValue as string); – Triynko Dec 16 '15 at 5:48
  • 1
    This feels like a mistake by the compiler designers. If all T can be explcitly cast to object and all object can be explcitly cast to string then there should exist a transitive rule that T can be explicitly cast to string. If you incorrectly perform the cast then a runime error should occur. – P.Brian.Mackey May 2 '18 at 23:54
9

Both lines have the same problem

T newT1 = "some text";
T newT2 = (string)t;

The compiler doesn't know that T is a string and so has no way of knowing how to assign that. But since you checked you can just force it with

T newT1 = "some text" as T;
T newT2 = t; 

you don't need to cast the t since it's already a string, also need to add the constraint

where T : class
  • 2
    Wrong. This will not compile. See my answer. – SLaks Nov 3 '10 at 23:04
  • 2
    Compiles just fine (with the where that is, added that a few seconds after I posted, might have missed that). Oops nm forgot to change the cast – Doggett Nov 3 '10 at 23:07
1

If you're checking for explicit types, why are you declaring those variables as T's?

T HowToCast<T>(T t)
{
    if (typeof(T) == typeof(string))
    {
        var newT1 = "some text";
        var newT2 = t;  //this builds but I'm not sure what it does under the hood.
        var newT3 = t.ToString();  //for sure the string you want.
    }

    return t;
}
  • 5
    The second line creates a variable of type T. – SLaks Nov 3 '10 at 23:28
  • You ask why check the type? Suppose you have a base field type which stores object values, with derived types that store string values. Suppose these fields also have a "DefaultIfNotProvided" value, so you need to check whether the user-provided value (which could be an object or a string or even a numeric primitive) is equivalent to default(T). String may be treated as a special case where an empty/whitespace string is treated the same as default(T), so you may want to check whether T userValue; var isBlank = (userValue is string) && String.IsNullOrWhitespace(userValue as string);. – Triynko Dec 16 '15 at 6:00
0

You will also get this error if you have a generic declaration for both your class and your method. For example the code shown below gives this compile error.

public class Foo <T> {

    T var;

    public <T> void doSomething(Class <T> cls) throws InstantiationException, IllegalAccessException {
        this.var = cls.newInstance();
    }

}

This code does compile (note T removed from method declaration):

public class Foo <T> {

    T var;

    public void doSomething(Class <T> cls) throws InstantiationException, IllegalAccessException {
        this.var = cls.newInstance();
    }

}
-4

Change this line:

if (typeof(T) == typeof(string))

For this line:

if (t.GetType() == typeof(string))
  • 1
    they are the same – bigworld12 Mar 24 '17 at 1:06
  • Both are the same... just using the language keyword vs using class library APIs. – Abdulhameed Shalabi 18 mins ago

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