12

I am trying to pause music that is playing when the headset is unplugged.

I have created a BroadcastReceiver that listens for ACTION_HEADSET_PLUG intents and acts upon them when the state extra is 0 (for unplugged). My problem is that an ACTION_HEADSET_PLUG intent is received by my BroadcastReceiver whenever the activity is started. This is not the behavior that I would expect. I would expect the Intent to be fired only when the headset is plugged in or unplugged.

Is there a reason that the ACTION_HEADSET_PLUG Intent is caught immediately after registering a receiver with that IntentFilter? Is there a clear way that I can work with this issue?

I would assume that since the default music player implements similar functionality when the headset is unplugged that it would be possible.

What am I missing?

This is the registration code

registerReceiver(new HeadsetConnectionReceiver(), 
                 new IntentFilter(Intent.ACTION_HEADSET_PLUG));

This is the definition of HeadsetConnectionReceiver

public class HeadsetConnectionReceiver extends BroadcastReceiver {

    public void onReceive(Context context, Intent intent) {
        Log.w(TAG, "ACTION_HEADSET_PLUG Intent received");
    }

}
17

Thanks for the reply Jake. I should have updated the original post to indicate that I discovered the issue that I was having. After a bit of research, I discovered that the ACTION_HEADSET_PLUG Intent is broadcast using the sendStickyBroadcast method in Context.

Sticky Intents are held by the system after being broadcast. That Intent will be caught whenever a new BroadcastReceiver is registered to receive it. It is triggered immediately after registration containing the last updated value. In the case of the headset, this is useful to be able to determine that the headset is already plugged in when you first register your receiver.

This is the code that I used to receive the ACTION_HEADSET_PLUG Intent:

 private boolean headsetConnected = false;

 public void onReceive(Context context, Intent intent) {
     if (intent.hasExtra("state")){
         if (headsetConnected && intent.getIntExtra("state", 0) == 0){
             headsetConnected = false;
             if (isPlaying()){
                stopStreaming();
             }
         } else if (!headsetConnected && intent.getIntExtra("state", 0) == 1){
            headsetConnected = true;
         }
     }
 }
  • An alternative solution would be to use the removeStickyBroadcast() method, for cases where you can't just ignore commands when your service isPlaying. – greg7gkb Apr 22 '11 at 2:17
  • 16
    I think an even better solution is to use isInitialStickyBroadcast() in your receiver. This doesn't require defining the permission to remove sticky broadcasts, and won't cause side effects to other applications. – amram99 Aug 17 '11 at 14:41
  • Hey again Doug. I might have misunderstood something about this intent, receiver system that android has. But how do you have access to isPlaying, i would recognize them being in your original activity? :-) – Anders Metnik Oct 27 '11 at 14:21
  • Anders: Sorry that it took me so long to find your question. I'm defining my HeadsetBroadcastReceiver inside of a Service. The isPlaying method is defined in the Service. – Doug Miller Dec 12 '11 at 21:31
  • Doug I've solved checking isInitialStickyBroadcast() :) Thanks anyway for the question – StErMi Apr 11 '12 at 12:24
0

I use a different approach to stop playback when headset is unplug. I do not want you to use it since you are already fine, but some other people may find it useful. If you get control of audio focus, then Android will send you an event audio becoming noisy, so if you write a receiver for this event it will look like

 public void onReceive(Context context, Intent intent) {
if  (AudioManager.ACTION_AUDIO_BECOMING_NOISY.equals(intent.getAction())) { 
       if (isPlaying()){
            stopStreaming();
        }
    }
 }
-2

I ran into the same issue. I'm not sure what causes it, but at least in my testing it seems to be consistent, which means you can work around it. I did just that by adding a boolean member variable that starts as true, and is set to false on the first onReceive(Context, Intent) call. This flag then controls whether I actually process the unplug event or not.

For your reference, here is the code I use to do just that, which is available in context here.

private boolean isFirst;

public void onReceive(Context context, Intent intent)
{
    if(!isFirst)
    {
        // Do stuff...
    }
    else
    {
        Log.d("Hearing Saver", "First run receieved.");
        isFirst = false;
    }
}
  • 1
    Better use isInitialStickyBroadcast() as suggested in another comment. – Pointer Null Jan 3 '16 at 20:14

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