56

Is it possible in ES6 to set a variable inside of a try{} using const in strict mode?

'use strict';

const path = require('path');

try {
    const configPath = path.resolve(process.cwd(), config);
} catch(error) {
    //.....
}

console.log(configPath);

This fails to lint because configPath is defined out of scope. The only way this seems to work is by doing:

'use strict';

const path = require('path');

let configPath;
try {
    configPath = path.resolve(process.cwd(), config);
} catch(error) {
    //.....   
}

console.log(configPath);

Basically, is there any way to use const instead of let for this case?

4
  • 2
    What do you expect to happen with console.log(configPath); if an error is thrown? Dec 2, 2016 at 5:11
  • Not the only way. var is still exist. so use var inside the try{}catch(){}
    – pery mimon
    Dec 19, 2018 at 13:36
  • @FelixKling In that situation I expect configPath === undefined.
    – Dai
    Oct 27, 2020 at 19:48
  • It would be great if there was an inline try-catch expression or if try block could return a value to the outer scope. const value = try path.resolve() : undefined or const value = try { ... } catch(e) { .. }.
    – Qwerty
    Feb 17, 2021 at 19:43

7 Answers 7

94

Declaring a variable as const requires you to immediately point it to a value and this reference cannot be changed.

Meaning you cannot define it at one place (outside of try) and assign it a value somewhere else (inside of try).

const test; // Syntax Error
try {
  test = 5; 
} catch(err) {}

On the other hand, both creating it and giving it a value within the try block is fine.

try {
  const test = 5; // this is fine
} catch(err) {}

However, const is block-scoped, like let, so if you do create it and give it a value within your try block, it will only exist within that scope.

try {
  const test = 5; // this is fine
} catch(err) {}
console.log(test); // test doesn't exist here

Therefore, if you need to access this variable outside of the try, you must use let:

let configPath;
try {
   configPath = path.resolve(process.cwd(), config);
} catch(error) {
    //.....   
}

console.log(configPath);

Alternatively, although probably more confusingly, you can use var to create a variable within the try and use it outside of it because var is scoped within the function, not the block (and gets hoisted):

try {
   var configPath = path.resolve(process.cwd(), config);
} catch(error) {
    //.....   
}

console.log(configPath);
3
  • 5
    Is using var in this instance frowned upon, and should we always try to use let and const now? Or is var still ok for these kinds of use cases?
    – hamncheez
    Feb 28, 2019 at 22:47
  • 7
    @hamncheez the main issue with using var in this manner is that it introduces an additional cognitive overhead to the programmer. Such a situation makes it difficult to easily tell all the portions of the scope that this var is leaking into since it is actually global to the function (even though it is defined within a smaller block). This is particularly an issue in bigger functions or perhaps functions where similar (or same) variable names are used; var inherently requires more thinking to comprehend its behavior and is thus more prone to lead to bugs.
    – nem035
    Feb 28, 2019 at 22:52
  • 1
    I like the last method using var. However I'd always put configPath = undefined; in the catch block. Especially when the block is inside a loop, to avoid it to have the value from a previous iteration.
    – barney765
    Jan 26, 2020 at 13:57
30
'use strict';

const path = require('path');

const configPath = (function() {
  try {
    return path.resolve(process.cwd(), config);
  } catch (error) {
    //.....
  }
})()

console.log(configPath);
4
  • 1
    If you're using ramda.js, the tryCatch function provides an abstraction of this. See ramdajs.com/docs/#tryCatch
    – phhu
    Jul 3, 2020 at 12:32
  • That's so close to supporting a monadic approach to try/catch. Sep 14, 2020 at 12:22
  • Nice use of IIFEs I liked this approach! Jan 16, 2021 at 9:13
  • 1
    I'd recommend using arrow anonymous function, so that this is the same as in the outer context
    – YakovL
    Feb 9 at 12:24
5

I would try to use a temp variable with let and assign that to a const var after the try/catch and 'delete' the temp var.

'use strict';

let temp;
try {
  temp = path.resolve(process.cwd(), config);
} catch (error) {
  //.....   
}

const configPath = temp;
temp = undefined;

console.log(configPath);
3
  • I am not sure if using this or a function to assign the value is the way to go. This can be risky if you work with objects and forget to reset the temp. For instance: let temp = {a: 2}; const notemp = temp; temp.b = 3; will make booth temp and notemp into {a: 2, b:3}
    – Håkan KA
    Jun 27, 2018 at 9:05
  • Why not use delete temp?
    – Zer0
    Apr 10, 2020 at 13:20
  • 1
    @Zer0 because in JavaScript the delete operator "has nothing to do with directly freeing memory". It "removes a given property from an object". And temp is initialized to a string primitive that isn't a property of an object. And let, "unlike var, does not create a property on the global object". So temp doesn't refer to a property of an object.
    – ma11hew28
    Jan 23, 2021 at 20:09
2

There are plenty of good answers here. But it's real annoying to have to manage your lets being inside and out of scope. So if you are like me, and came here searching for a better pattern. I wrote a little utility that helps a ton.

export const tc = <T>(option: { try: () => T; catch: (e: Error) => T }) => {
  try {
    return option.try()
  } catch (e) {
    return option.catch(e)
  }
}

Here are some unit tests to show how it's useful

import { tc } from './tc'
describe('tc', () => {
  it('should return successfully', () => {
    const result = tc({
      try: () => 1 + 2,
      catch: () => -1,
    })
    expect(result).toEqual(3)
  })
  it('should catch', () => {
    const spy = jest.fn()
    const result = tc({
      try: (): number => {
        throw new Error('Test')
      },
      catch: (e) => {
        spy()
        expect(e.message).toEqual('Test')
        return -1
      },
    })
    expect(spy).toHaveBeenCalledTimes(1)
    expect(result)
  })
  it('should rethrow', () => {
    expect(() =>
      tc({
        try: (): number => {
          throw new Error('Test')
        },
        catch: (e) => {
          throw e
        },
      }),
    ).toThrowError()
  })
  it('should have proper types', () => {
    // @ts-expect-error
    const result: string = tc({
      try: () => 12,
      catch: (e) => {
        return -1
      },
    })
  })
})

2

You can avoid the try block altogether if the function is async! Just learned this today, thought I'd share!

More broadly applicable to just your situation as this is the top Google result for "const in a try block"

'use strict';
const path = require('path');

const getPath = async () => {
    return path.resolve(process.cwd())
}

const logPath = async () => {
    const configPath = await getPath().catch(e => console.log(e)) <--avoid the try
    console.log(configPath);
}

logPath()

Works great when you're already in an async function and need to wait for something else:

async function main() {
  const result = await asyncTask().catch(error => console.error(error));
}

Learned from: https://stackoverflow.com/a/55024396/2936521

1
  • Bear in mind that whatever is returned from the .catch will be assigned to the result. In both these examples the result will get a value of undefined (as discussed in the comments of the answer you linked).
    – sorohan
    Mar 8 at 23:55
1

Besides the let options I see here, another option may be to use an object, as the reference to the object is constant, but it's properties can be altered, so something like this:

'use strict';

const path = require('path');

const configPath = { value: null };

try {
    configPath.value = path.resolve(process.cwd(), config);
} catch(error) {
    //.....
}

console.log(configPath.value);

It would probably be cleaner to stick with let, but I just wanted to point out another possible option.

-3

Use let. You cannot use const. const does not allow you to reassign the declared constant. While it is generally good practice to declare objects like yours with const, the entire point of doing so is to allow objects to be mutated without allowing them to be reassigned. You are reassigning the object (thus, defeating the purpose of const), so use let instead.

let path = require('path');
// Good to go!

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