71

The Qt documentation for QThread says to create a class from QThread, and to implement the run method.

Below is taken from the 4.7 Qthread documentation...

To create your own threads, subclass QThread and reimplement run(). For example:

 class MyThread : public QThread
 {
 public:
     void run();
 };

 void MyThread::run()
 {
     QTcpSocket socket;
     // connect QTcpSocket's signals somewhere meaningful
     ...
     socket.connectToHost(hostName, portNumber);
     exec();
 }

So in every single thread I've created, I've done just that and for most things it works just fine (I do not implement moveToThread(this) in any of my objects and it works great).

I hit a snag last week (managed to get through it by working around where I created my objects) and found the following blog post. Here is basically says that subclassing QThread really isn't the correct way to do it (and that the documentation is incorrect).

This is coming from a Qt developer so at first glance I was interested and upon further reflection, agree with him. Following OO principles, you really only want to subclass a class to further enhance that class... not to just use the classes methods directly... thats why you instantiate...

Lets say I wanted to move a custom QObject class to a thread... what would be the 'correct' way of doing it? In that blog post, he 'says' he has an example somewhere... but if someone could further explain it to me it'd be greatly appreciated!

Update:

Since this question gets so much attention, here is a copy and paste of the 4.8 documentation with the 'proper' way to implement a QThread.

class Worker : public QObject
 {
     Q_OBJECT
     QThread workerThread;

 public slots:
     void doWork(const QString &parameter) {
         // ...
         emit resultReady(result);
     }

 signals:
     void resultReady(const QString &result);
 };

 class Controller : public QObject
 {
     Q_OBJECT
     QThread workerThread;
 public:
     Controller() {
         Worker *worker = new Worker;
         worker->moveToThread(&workerThread);
         connect(workerThread, SIGNAL(finished()), worker, SLOT(deleteLater()));
         connect(this, SIGNAL(operate(QString)), worker, SLOT(doWork(QString)));
         connect(worker, SIGNAL(resultReady(QString)), this, SLOT(handleResults(QString)));
         workerThread.start();
     }
     ~Controller() {
         workerThread.quit();
         workerThread.wait();
     }
 public slots:
     void handleResults(const QString &);
 signals:
     void operate(const QString &);
 };

I still believe that it is worthwhile to point out that they include an extra Worker::workerThread member that is unnecessary and is never used in their example. Remove that piece and it is a proper example of how to do threading in Qt.

4
  • 4
    The doc only says introducing new slots in QThread subclass is discouraged. Made no mention of deriving from QThread class. Deriving from QThread follows the same paradigm of Delphi/C++ Builder's TThread.
    – Zach Saw
    Nov 26, 2013 at 5:28
  • 3
  • 4
    Their example code will not compile until you modify the first 'connect' line to be the address of workerThread, like so: connect(&workerThread, SIGNAL(finished()), worker, SLOT(deleteLater())); Jul 12, 2014 at 2:09
  • 2
    I think that you should delete " QThread workerThread;" in WorkerObject. It made misunderstanding
    – kien bui
    May 7, 2018 at 7:11

5 Answers 5

32

About the only thing I can think of to add is to further state that QObjects have an affinity with a single thread. This is usually the thread that creates the QObject. So if you create a QObject in the app's main thread and want to use it in another thread, you need to use moveToThread() to change the affinity.

This saves having to subclass QThread and creating your objects in the run() method, thus keeping your stuff nicely encapsulated.

That blog post does include a link to an example. It is pretty short but it shows the basic idea. Create your QObjects, connect your signals, create your QThread, move your QObjects to the QThread and start the thread. The signal/slot mechanisms will ensure that thread boundaries are crossed properly and safely.

You may have to introduce synchronization if you have to call methods on your object outside of that mechanism.

I know Qt has some other nice threading facilities beyond threads that are probably worth getting familiar with but I have yet to do so :)

2
  • the linked example also says that they do subclass QThread and implement run() to do an exec(). This will basically start the event loop and enable the connections to do their thing... From what I gather, you shouldn't need to do that (from the original post I listed) or am I misunderstanding and you will still need to do this?
    – g19fanatic
    Nov 4, 2010 at 3:04
  • 1
    You understand correctly. As of Qt 4.4, the default implementation of run() does this for you. Nov 4, 2010 at 3:08
10

Here's one example of how to use QThread correctly, but it has some issues with it, which are reflected in the comments. In particular, since the order in which the slots are executed isn't strictly defined, it could lead to various problems. The comment posted on August 6, 2013 gives a nice idea how to deal with this issue. I use something like that in my program, and here's some example code to clarify.

The basic idea is the same: I create a QThread instance that lives in my main thread, a worker class instance that lives in the new thread I created, and then I connect all the signals.

void ChildProcesses::start()
{
    QThread *childrenWatcherThread = new QThread();
    ChildrenWatcher *childrenWatcher = new ChildrenWatcher();
    childrenWatcher->moveToThread(childrenWatcherThread);
    // These three signals carry the "outcome" of the worker job.
    connect(childrenWatcher, SIGNAL(exited(int, int)),
            SLOT(onChildExited(int, int)));
    connect(childrenWatcher, SIGNAL(signalled(int, int)),
            SLOT(onChildSignalled(int, int)));
    connect(childrenWatcher, SIGNAL(stateChanged(int)),
            SLOT(onChildStateChanged(int)));
    // Make the watcher watch when the thread starts:
    connect(childrenWatcherThread, SIGNAL(started()),
            childrenWatcher, SLOT(watch()));
    // Make the watcher set its 'stop' flag when we're done.
    // This is performed while the watch() method is still running,
    // so we need to execute it concurrently from this thread,
    // hence the Qt::DirectConnection. The stop() method is thread-safe
    // (uses a mutex to set the flag).
    connect(this, SIGNAL(stopped()),
            childrenWatcher, SLOT(stop()), Qt::DirectConnection);
    // Make the thread quit when the watcher self-destructs:
    connect(childrenWatcher, SIGNAL(destroyed()),
            childrenWatcherThread, SLOT(quit()));
    // Make the thread self-destruct when it finishes,
    // or rather, make the main thread delete it:
    connect(childrenWatcherThread, SIGNAL(finished()),
            childrenWatcherThread, SLOT(deleteLater()));
    childrenWatcherThread->start();
}

Some background:

The ChildProcesses class is a child process manager that starts new child processes with spawn() calls, keeps the list of the processes currently running and so on. However, it needs to keep track of the children states, which means using waitpid() call on Linux or WaitForMultipleObjects on Windows. I used to call these in non-blocking mode using a timer, but now I want more prompt reaction, which means blocking mode. That's where the thread comes in.

The ChildrenWatcher class is defined as follows:

class ChildrenWatcher: public QObject {
    Q_OBJECT
private:
    QMutex mutex;
    bool stopped;
    bool isStopped();
public:
    ChildrenWatcher();
public slots:
    /// This is the method which runs in the thread.
    void watch();
    /// Sets the stop flag.
    void stop();
signals:
    /// A child process exited normally.
    void exited(int ospid, int code);
    /// A child process crashed (Unix only).
    void signalled(int ospid, int signal);
    /// Something happened to a child (Unix only).
    void stateChanged(int ospid);
};

Here how it works. When all this stuff is started, the ChildProcess::start() method is called (see above). It creates a new QThread and a new ChildrenWatcher, which is then moved to the new thread. Then I connect three signals which inform my manager about the fate of its child processes (exited/signalled/god-knows-what-happened). Then starts the main fun.

I connect QThread::started() to the ChildrenWatcher::watch() method so it is started as soon as the thread is ready. Since the watcher lives in the new thread, that's where the watch() method is executed (queued connection is used to call the slot).

Then I connect the ChildProcesses::stopped() signal to the ChildrenWatcher::stop() slot using Qt::DirectConnection because I need to do it asynchronously. This is needed so my thread stops when the ChildProcesses manager is no longer needed. The stop() method looks like this:

void ChildrenWatcher::stop()
{
    mutex.lock();
    stopped = true;
    mutex.unlock();
}

And then ChildrenWatcher::watch():

void ChildrenWatcher::watch()
{
  while (!isStopped()) {
    // Blocking waitpid() call here.
    // Maybe emit one of the three informational signals here too.
  }
  // Self-destruct now!
  deleteLater();
}

Oh, and the isStopped() method is just a convenient way to use a mutex in the while() condition:

bool ChildrenWatcher::isStopped()
{
    bool stopped;
    mutex.lock();
    stopped = this->stopped;
    mutex.unlock();
    return stopped;
}

So what happens here is that I set the stopped flag when I need to finish, and then the next time isStopped() is called it returns false and the thread ends.

So what happens when the watch() loop ends? It calls deleteLater() so the object self-destructs as soon as control is returned to the thread event loop which happens just right after the deleteLater() call (when watch() returns). Going back to ChildProcesses::start(), you can see that there is a connection from the destroyed() signal of the watcher to the quit() slot of the thread. This means that the thread automatically finishes when the watcher is done. And when it's finished, it self-destructs too because its own finished() signal is connected to its deleteLater() slot.

This is pretty much the same idea as Maya posted, but because I use the self-destruct idiom, I don't need to depend on the sequence in which the slots are called. It's always self-destruct first, stop thread later, then it self-destructs too. I could define a finished() signal in the worker, and then connect it to its own deleteLater(), but that would only mean one connection more. Since I don't need a finished() signal for any other purpose, I chose to just call deleteLater() from the worker itself.

Maya also mentions that you shouldn't allocate new QObjects in the worker's constructor because they won't live in the thread you move the worker to. I'd say do it anyway because that's the way OOP works. Just make sure all those QObjects are children of the worker (that is, use the QObject(QObject*) constructor) - moveToThread() moves all the children along with the object being moved. If you really need to have QObjects that aren't children of your object, then override moveToThread() in your worker so it moves all the necessary stuff too.

6
  • while I appreciate you showing your implementation of event-based manager, it isn't pertinent to this question. The question was in relation to the documentation discrepancy between how Qt used to recommend threads be implemented and the 'proper' way to do so (which is now better in current documentation)...
    – g19fanatic
    Aug 19, 2013 at 11:35
  • 2
    @g19, I've found your question (and several other pages) while googling for the correct way to use QThread. Only after that I implemented this, and then I realized that it's exactly what I was googling for. So I posted it in hope that someone else who is googling for "correct way to use QThread" will find this useful. Aug 20, 2013 at 14:52
  • @g19, oh, and I was working with Qt 4.6 or something, so I had no idea that they changed the docs. But the docs are still very limited and don't explain how to do what I needed (and many other people need to), so I guess the question is still valid. Aug 20, 2013 at 14:58
  • 1
    Now they sort of promote ask-a-faq-question-and-answer-it-yourself for this type of stuff on SO, so you may be could transform this into a separate question (listing all the pitfalls you found in detail), and also get some nice upvotes :)
    – mlvljr
    Oct 27, 2013 at 17:00
  • 1
    I found your answer very useful, but it would be good if you posted the complete code somewhere (e.g. Gist) to get all the detail.
    – parsley72
    Apr 27, 2014 at 7:50
3

Not to detract from @sergey-tachenov's excellent answer, but in Qt5 you can stop using SIGNAL and SLOT, simplify your code and have the advantage of compile time checking:

void ChildProcesses::start()
{
    QThread *childrenWatcherThread = new QThread();
    ChildrenWatcher *childrenWatcher = new ChildrenWatcher();
    childrenWatcher->moveToThread(childrenWatcherThread);
    // These three signals carry the "outcome" of the worker job.
    connect(childrenWatcher, ChildrenWatcher::exited,
            ChildProcesses::onChildExited);
    connect(childrenWatcher, ChildrenWatcher::signalled,
            ChildProcesses::onChildSignalled);
    connect(childrenWatcher, ChildrenWatcher::stateChanged,
            ChildProcesses::onChildStateChanged);
    // Make the watcher watch when the thread starts:
    connect(childrenWatcherThread, QThread::started,
            childrenWatcher, ChildrenWatcher::watch);
    // Make the watcher set its 'stop' flag when we're done.
    // This is performed while the watch() method is still running,
    // so we need to execute it concurrently from this thread,
    // hence the Qt::DirectConnection. The stop() method is thread-safe
    // (uses a mutex to set the flag).
    connect(this, ChildProcesses::stopped,
            childrenWatcher, ChildrenWatcher::stop, Qt::DirectConnection);
    // Make the thread quit when the watcher self-destructs:
    connect(childrenWatcher, ChildrenWatcher::destroyed,
            childrenWatcherThread, QThread::quit);
    // Make the thread self-destruct when it finishes,
    // or rather, make the main thread delete it:
    connect(childrenWatcherThread, QThread::finished,
            childrenWatcherThread, QThread::deleteLater);
    childrenWatcherThread->start();
}
3

subclassing the qthread class will still run the code in the originating thread. I wanted to run a udp listener in application which is already using the GUI Thread(the main thread) and while my udp listener was working perfectly my GUI was frozen as it was blocked by the subclassed qthread event handlers. I think what g19fanatic posted is correct but you will also need the worker thread to succesfully migrate the object to the new thread. I found this post which describes in details of the Do's and Dont's of the threading in QT.

Must Read before you decide to subclass QThread !

2
  • 1
    Not true. The code running in the overridden function run() will run on the new thread.
    – Vincent
    May 3, 2017 at 21:03
  • From Qt docs: It is important to remember that a QThread instance lives in the old thread that instantiated it, not in the new thread that calls run(). This means that all of QThread's queued slots will execute in the old thread.
    – Vincent
    May 3, 2017 at 21:09
0

My version of best-practice thread model in Qt5 is as simple as this: worker.h:

/*
* This is a simple, safe and best-practice way to demonstrate how to use threads in Qt5.
* Copyright (C) 2019 Iman Ahmadvand
*
* This is free software: you can redistribute it and/or modify
* it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
* the Free Software Foundation, either version 3 of the License, or
* (at your option) any later version.
*
* It is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
* but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
* MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the
* GNU General Public License for more details.
*/

#ifndef _WORKER_H
#define _WORKER_H

#include <QtCore/qobject.h>
#include <QtCore/qbytearray.h>
#include <QtCore/qthread.h>
#include <QtGui/qevent.h>

namespace concurrent {

    class EventPrivate;
    class Event : public QEvent {
    public:
        enum {
            EventType1 = User + 1
        };

        explicit Event(QEvent::Type);
        Event(QEvent::Type, const QByteArray&);

        void setData(const QByteArray&);
        QByteArray data() const;

    protected:
        EventPrivate* d;
    };

    class WorkerPrivate;
    /* A worker class to manage one-call and permanent tasks using QThread object */
    class Worker : public QObject {
        Q_OBJECT

    public:
        Worker(QThread*);
        ~Worker();

    protected slots:
        virtual void init();

    protected:
        bool event(QEvent*) override;

    protected:
        WorkerPrivate* d;

    signals:
        /* this signals is used for one call type worker */
        void finished(bool success);
    };

} // namespace concurrent

#endif // !_WORKER_H

worker.cpp:

/*
* This is a simple, safe and best-practice way to demonstrate how to use threads in Qt5.
* Copyright (C) 2019 Iman Ahmadvand
*
* This is free software: you can redistribute it and/or modify
* it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
* the Free Software Foundation, either version 3 of the License, or
* (at your option) any later version.
*
* It is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
* but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
* MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the
* GNU General Public License for more details.
*/

#include "worker.h"

using namespace concurrent;

class concurrent::EventPrivate {
public:
    QByteArray data;
};

Event::Event(QEvent::Type t):QEvent(t), d(new EventPrivate) {
    setAccepted(false);
}

Event::Event(QEvent::Type t, const QByteArray& __data) : Event(t) {
    setData(__data);
}

void Event::setData(const QByteArray& __data) {
    d->data = __data;
}

QByteArray Event::data() const {
    return d->data;
}



class concurrent::WorkerPrivate {
public:
    WorkerPrivate() {

    }
};

Worker::Worker(QThread* __thread) :QObject(nullptr), d(new WorkerPrivate) {
    moveToThread(__thread);

    QObject::connect(__thread, &QThread::started, this, &Worker::init);
    QObject::connect(this, &Worker::finished, __thread, &QThread::quit);
    QObject::connect(__thread, &QThread::finished, __thread, &QThread::deleteLater);
    QObject::connect(__thread, &QThread::finished, this, &Worker::deleteLater);
}

Worker::~Worker() {
    /* do clean up if needed */
}

void Worker::init() {
    /* this will called once for construction and initializing purpose */
}

bool Worker::event(QEvent* e) {
    /* event handler */
    if (e->type() == Event::EventType1) {
        /* do some work with event's data and emit signals if needed */
        auto ev = static_cast<Event*>(e);
        ev->accept();
    }
    return QObject::event(e);
}

usage.cpp:

#include <QtCore/qcoreapplication.h>
#include "worker.h"

using namespace concurrent;

Worker* create(bool start) {
    auto worker = new Worker(new QThread);
    if (start)
        worker->thread()->start();

    return worker;
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    QCoreApplication app(argc, argv);
    auto worker = create(true);
    if (worker->thread()->isRunning()) {
        auto ev = new Event(static_cast<QEvent::Type>(Event::EventType1));
        qApp->postEvent(worker, ev, Qt::HighEventPriority);
    }
    return app.exec();
}

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