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I am trying to use fish as my shell. When I login with LightDM, I want to start certain Xsession apps, but only when the shell in invoked at the outset by LightDM.

I have tried this in ~/.config/fish/config.fish:

###################################################################
# Start xsession applications, but only once.
if test -z "$XSESSION_STARTED"
  set -xg XSESSION_STARTED 'f'
end

if test "$XSESSION_STARTED" = 'f'
  xsession-apps
end

The function xsession-apps then starts all the apps in the background and sets the environment variable at the end like this:

set -xg XSESSION_STARTED "t"

But XSESSION_STARTED does not appear to get set to 't' and causes the xsession-apps function to get called every time, even when I start a new terminal within gnome-term.

What am I missing. Is there a better way to approach this?

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even when I start a new terminal within gnome-term.

That is to be expected. Global variables are set within that particular fish. If you start another fish, it won't have it (unless you start it inside that fish, because the variable is exported).

There's a few ways to approach this:

  • Don't do it in config.fish at all - use the DE's autostart mechanism or at least ~/.xinitrc. This is the best and cleanest approach, and independent of your shell.

  • Use universal variables - these are stored persistently and shared for all fish sessions on the machine. The issue here is invalidating it - you need to unset the variable again once you logout/reboot, but if your machine crashed that wouldn't happen

  • Use a flag file on a tmpfs (i.e. in RAM) - this will be automatically invalidated if your machine stops, whatever the cause. You need to setup a tmpfs for it, though.

  • 1
    One thing @faho didn't stress which is worth noting is that environment variables (what you get from set -gx) are only visible to programs started by that shell. When you open a new terminal that program is started by LightDM which has no knowledge of the XSESSION_STARTED env var since it was created by a child process. Environment variables are not globally visible to every process on your system. That's not how they work. – Kurtis Rader Dec 3 '16 at 0:28
  • Faho, thanks for the answer. Putting it in ~/.xsessionrc worked if I used a bash function to launch the fish function. I will put my code below. – Daniel Doherty Dec 15 '16 at 15:43
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Here is the code I used in ~/.xsessionrc:

# Apps launched directly by X window managers don't have their environment set
if [ $SHELL = "/usr/bin/fish" ]
then
    /usr/bin/fish -c xsession-apps
else
   source ~/src/dotfiles/keychain.sh
   source ~/src/dotfiles/shell/aliases
   source ~/src/dotfiles/shell/env
   source ~/src/dotfiles/xsession-apps

   eval "$(~/.rbenv/bin/rbenv init -)"
fi

It initializes fish or bash/zsh, depending on what I'm in the mood for at the time. Lately, I'm liking fish. I then defined a fish function called xsession-apps to launch the things I wanted started up in my X session, such as dropbox, hplip, xmobar, etc. I have a similar setup as a bash script, also called xsession-apps that gets sourced if I'm not using fish.

By the way, I use xmonad as my windowing environment.

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