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There is some cases where I would like to use React without rendering actual DOM Nodes. For example, when using <canvas> it would be nice to be able to add children to the canvas like so:

<canvas>
    <Rectangle>
        <Circle />
    </Rectangle>
<canvas>

The <Rectangle /> or <Circle /> could have access to the canvas element by either passing it as props or with context and they could draw on it using both componentDidMount and componentDidUpdate.

There is libraries that does something similar like react-pixi or react-three but they mess a lot with react internal functions.

At first I tough I could have the render function of <Rectangle /> or <Circle /> returning either this.props.children or null but this approach doesn't work if some children are an array. It then needs to be wrapped in an element.

For example, if <Rectangle /> and <Circle /> render function look like this:

render: function()
{
    return this.props.children || null;
}

This won't works

<canvas>
    <Rectangle>
        <Circle />
        <Circle />
    </Rectangle>
<canvas>

So I've figured out a solution using document fragment.

First there is a top FragmentTree component that needs to wrap anything inside <canvas>.

Something like this:

var React = require('react');
var ReactDOM = require('react-dom');

var FragmentTree = React.createClass({

    getInitialState: function()
    {
        var fragment = document.createDocumentFragment();
        var rootNode = document.createElement('div');
        fragment.appendChild(rootNode);
        return {
            fragment: fragment,
            rootNode: rootNode
        };
    },

    render: function()
    {
        return null;
    },

    componentDidMount: function()
    {
        if (this.props.children) {
            this.renderChildren();
        }
    },

    componentDidUpdate: function(prevProps, prevState)
    {
        var elementChanged = this.state.element !== prevState.element;
        var childrenChanged = this.props.children !== prevProps.children;
        if (elementChanged || (this.props.children && childrenChanged)) {
            this.renderChildren();
        }
    },

    renderChildren: function()
    {
        var fragment = this.state.fragment;
        var rootNode = this.state.rootNode;
        var children = React.Children.map(this.props.children, function(child)
        {
            return React.cloneElement(child, {
                _fragment: fragment,
                _parentNode: rootNode
            });
        });

        var element = React.createElement('div', null, children);
        ReactDOM.render(element, rootNode);
    }

});

module.exports = FragmentTree;

And then, there is an component that wrap any components inside the FragmentTree. Here is a factory for it.

var React = require('react');

function createFragmentTreeElement(Component)
{
    var FragmentTreeElement = React.createClass({

        render: function()
        {
            if (_.isArray(this.props.children)){
                return (
                    <Component {...this.props}>
                        <div>
                            { this.props.children }
                        </div>
                    </Component>
                );
            }

            return (
                <Component {...this.props}>
                    { this.props.children }
                </Component>
            );
        }

    });

    return FragmentTreeElement;
}

module.exports = createFragmentTreeElement;

So "fake" components are created like so:

var Rectangle = React.createClass({

    render: function()
    {
        return this.props.children || null;
    },

    componentDidMount: function()
    {
        //Draw the rectangle
    },

    componentDidUpdate: function()
    {
        //Update the rectangle
    }

});

module.exports = createFragmentTreeElement(Rectangle);

And then this will work:

<canvas>
    <FragmentTree>
        <Rectangle>
            <Circle />
            <Circle>
                <Circle />
            </Circle>
        </Rectangle>
    </FragmentTree>
<canvas>

It seems to work really well, since any components behave normally. Also the memory and processing should be minimal since it is rendered in a document fragment and the wrapping <div> nodes are not really modified.

Is it a good idea? Am I playing with the devil?

Thanks

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