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I don't like using Object.entries(object).map((key, i) because I found out that this is an experimental technology of ECMAScript 7 and I feel that something may go wrong on production. Are there any native javascript alternative?

I have no problems with values of name, price, description because I know exactly where they should be rendered and I can access them with Populate.key, but for the characteristics, I need to literate over object and render both key and value.

I tried to use Object.keys(priceChars).map(function(key, i) but didn't understand how to separate key from value. Like, it was rendering "performance 500", but I need performance word to be in a icon class, and 500 is an actual value to be displayed.

My JSON structure

const Populate = {
  'name': "Product",
  'price': "1000",
  'description': "Product description",
  'characteristics': {
    'performance': '500',
    'pressure': '180',
    'engine': '4',
    'size': '860*730*1300',
    'weight': '420'
  }
}

And component

class PriceBlock extends Component {
  render() {
    const {priceName, priceDesc, priceVal, priceChars} = this.props;
    const characteristics = Object.entries(priceChars).map((key, i) => {
      return (
        <div className="price__icon-row" key={i}>
          <i className={'ico ico-' + key[0]}></i> <span>{key[1]}</span>
        </div>
      );
    });
    return (
      <div className="col-5 price__block">
        <div className="price__name">{priceName}</div>
        <div className="price__description">{priceDesc}</div>
        <div className="price__icons">
          {characteristics}
        </div>
        <div className={ managePriceClass(priceVal) }>{priceVal}</div>
      </div>
    );
  }
}
  • 2
    @Endless: This question has basically nothing to do with React. – Felix Kling Dec 3 '16 at 20:25
  • 1
    If you're using a compiler like Babel, it shouldn't be a concern as long as your configuration is properly set. – Dom Aug 11 '17 at 5:49
79
a = { 
  a: 1,
  b: 2,
  c: 3
}

Object.keys(a).map(function(keyName, keyIndex) {
  // use keyName to get current key's name
  // and a[keyName] to get its value
})

A newer version, using destructuring and arrow functions. I'd use this one for new code:

a = { 
  a: 1,
  b: 2,
  c: 3
}

Object.entries(a).map(([key, value]) => {
    // Pretty straightforward - use key for the key and value for the value.
    // Just to clarify: unlike object destructuring, the parameter names don't matter here.
})
  • 1
    is there also an elegant way to exclude __typename? – henk Jul 10 '17 at 23:56
  • What's __typename? – nadavvadan Jul 12 '17 at 10:15
  • 1
    @meadlai you need to convert the anonymous function as an arrow function. So, instead of function(keyName, keyIndex) { ... } you need to do (keyName, keyIndex) => { ... } – stavros.zavrakas Jun 1 '18 at 13:03
  • 1
    nadavvadan: "The __typename field is a so-called "meta field" (part of the GraphQL specification) which power its introspection (and similar functionality). It represents the name of the GraphQL object type being queried." (quote lifted from spectrum.chat/graphql/general/… ) – Nicolai S Jan 23 '19 at 14:37
  • 1
    @JGallardo - I find it simple and self-explanatory. Feel free to suggest an edit – nadavvadan Oct 16 '19 at 8:24

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