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I was learning about the function system() is stdlib.h and realized I could create a program that ran itself using system(). I wrote this code and tried it:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(){
    printf("x");
    system("./a.out");
}

It print exactly 563 x's to console every time I run it before exiting normally (no errors). I would like to know what is stopping the program and where this number comes from as it seems very arbitrary to me. Thanks

Thanks for the insight regarding this first program but I'm not convinced the system is stopping it because it is running out of resources for the following reason: I just wrote this new program and it has not yet stopped.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(){
    printf("x");
    system("./a.out");
    system("./a.out");
}

Also, when I tried to open a new console window I got this error:

/.oh-my-zsh/lib/theme-and-appearance.zsh:24: fork failed: resource temporarily unavailable

/.oh-my-zsh/oh-my-zsh.sh:57: fork failed: resource temporarily unavailable
3
  • 2
    "... I'm not convinced the system is stopping it because it is running out of resources ..." - "... I got this error: fork failed: resource temporarily unavailable ..." - convinced yet?
    – marcelm
    Dec 4, 2016 at 14:27
  • I would like to expand on the fact that your second program does should not print x twice as much as the first - rather, the number of x's (and the runtime) doubles for each call of the program. So you get, roughly, 2^563 x's printed to the screen - it's never going to stop. Dec 4, 2016 at 17:31
  • How do you know there were no errors, when you don't check return value of system() call? Clearly there is an error, you just ignore it.
    – hyde
    Dec 4, 2016 at 19:41

3 Answers 3

31

I'll tackle the second program first, since that's easiest to explain. Try this code instead which will print out the recursion depth as it goes.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

int main(int argc, char** argv){
  int depth = argc > 1 ? atoi(argv[1]) : 0;
  printf("%d\n", depth);
  char cmd[128];
  sprintf(cmd, "%s %d", "./a.out", depth+1);
  system(cmd);
  system(cmd);
}

It will grow up until your limit (in my case 538), then start trashing up and down the recursion tree.

530 531 532 533 534 535 536 537 538 538 537 538 538 536 537

Eventually this process would finish, but it will take a very long time!

As for the first program. I believe you are just running into your user process limit.

You can find your process limit by running

ulimit -u

In my case the limit is 709. Count my other processes running with

ps aux | grep user | wc -l

That gives me 171. 171 + 538 (my depth at which the program died) gives a solid answer for you :)

https://superuser.com/questions/559709/how-to-change-the-maximum-number-of-fork-process-by-user-in-linux

1
  • Or, simply echo $(($(ps aux | grep user | wc -l) + $(ulimit -u))) Dec 4, 2016 at 4:37
5

There is nothing in your program to stop the infinite recursion.

You execute a.out.  
  a.out executes a.out  
    a.out executes a.out  
      a.out executes a.out  
        a.out executes a.out  

and so on.

At some point, the system runs of of resources and does not execute the next system call and the programs exit in the reverse order. It appears that your computer reached the limit by the time it ran the program 563 times.

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  • 1
    where does the number 563 come from though? it is exactly that every time.
    – Mathew
    Dec 4, 2016 at 2:55
  • @fred, the limit depends on the computer, the OS, and the number of other processes that are running at the time you execute a.out.
    – R Sahu
    Dec 4, 2016 at 2:57
  • 1
    Why does the OS not run out of resources now?
    – Mathew
    Dec 4, 2016 at 3:06
  • 1
    @fred, you made the program a LOT worse by adding the second system call. Make it simpler. Assume that the computer will not execute any more system calls after 2 calls. Now try to trace the execution path. You will notice that the program execution never stops.
    – R Sahu
    Dec 4, 2016 at 3:17
3

To see what happens under the hood use one of the following programs:

  • strace (Linux)
  • truss (Solaris)
  • ktrace (BSD)
  • Process Monitor (Windows)

These programs list all the system calls made by the process, including any error codes.

Read their documentation, since that will help you more in the long run than me giving a single use case here.

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