14

Are function declarations/prototypes necessary in C99 ?

I am currently defining my functions in a header file and #include-ING it in the main file. Is this OK in C99 ?

Why do most programmers declare/prototype the function before main() and define it after main() ? Isn't it just easier to define them before main and avoid all the declarations/prototypes ?

Contents of header.h file:

int foo(int foo)
{
// code
return 1;
}

Contents of main file:

#include <stdio.h>

#include "header.h"

int main(void)
{
foo(1);
return 0;
}

10 Answers 10

19

How and where to prototype and define a function in C :

  1. Your function is used only in a specific .c file : Define it static in the .c file. The function will only be visible and compiled for this file.

  2. Your function is used in multiple .c files : Choose an appropriate c file to host your definition (All foo related functions in a foo.c file for example), and have a related header file to have all non-static (think public) functions prototyped. The function will be compiled only once, but visible to any file that includes the header files. Everything will be put together at link time. Possible improvement : always make the related header file, the first one included in its c file, this way, you will be sure that any file can include it safely without the need of other includes to make it work, reference : Large Scale C++ projects (Most of the rules apply to C too).

  3. Your function is inlinable (are you sure it is ?) : Define the function static inline in an appropriate header file. The compiler should replace any call to your function by the definition if it is possible (think macro-like).

The notion of before-after another function (your main function) in c is only a matter of style. Either you do :

static int foo(int foo) 
{ 
// code 
return 1; 
} 

int main(void) 
{ 
foo(1); 
return 0; 
} 

Or

static int foo(int foo);

int main(void) 
{ 
foo(1); 
return 0; 
} 

static int foo(int foo)
{ 
// code 
return 1; 
} 

will result in the same program. The second way is prefered by programmers because you don`t have to reorganize or declare new prototypes every time you declare a new function that use the other ones. Plus you get a nice list of every functions declared in your file. It makes life easier in the long run for you and your team.

2
  • 1
    Can I put static foo's declaration in .h file, definition in .c file?
    – Alcott
    Mar 3 '12 at 3:59
  • @Alcott : No, I think you would get an error : " ‘foo’ declared ‘static’ but never defined " for every file that would include your header. Think about static as "local". It wouldn't make sense to advertise (put in a header file) something as local to everyone, unless you provide it for local copy (inlining) to everyone.
    – Matthieu
    Mar 3 '12 at 21:47
6

People typically do it because it's easier to do with multiple files. If you declare in a header then you can just #include that header anywhere you need those functions. If you define them in a header and then include in another translation unit, bang.

1
  • but using a (watch)dog and static functions can easily protect you from the bang. You may even want to define functions in headers. Why would you want to do that, sound dangerous (it is) ? Most compilers optimize way better the code of static functions. Cost is compilation time and some code duplication if you don't go all the way (define all of a program in headers). I'm currently working on a C++ program of about 40000 lines using this style, works fine for me.
    – kriss
    Nov 4 '10 at 13:18
4

Function declarations are required in C99. Function prototypes are not required in C99.

Declaring functions before the point of the call and defining them after the point of the call is a popular approach to structuring the program code. However, this is in no way what the "most" programmers do. On the contrary, a more popular approach is to define function before the point of the first call, in which case the separate declaration is not necessary. This approach requires less maintenance, which is why it is more popular than what you describe.

Separate declarations/definitions are normally used with external functions only, i.e. with functions used across several translation units. Such functions are declared in header files and defined in implementation files.

0
4

You should only ever define inline functions in headers. Although you can have extern inline functions, the common case is static inline.

Rule of thumb for header files:

  • function declarations should be extern
  • function definitions should be static inline
  • variable declarations should be extern
  • variable definitions should be static const

As C. Ross asked for it, here's reasoning behind it: A resource with external linkage should only ever be defined once[1]. It follows that definitions should not reside in header files, which are intended to be included in more than one place.

Having static definitions in header files won't lead to any problems, but is generally frowned upon because the code has to be compiled more than once and will be present in different object files, which will increase the executable size (assuming the linker isn't smart enough to figure out the code duplication).

The common exceptions to this rule are constants and inline functions, which are supposed to be visible to the compiler in each translation unit to make further optimizations possible.

Note: [1] This does not apply to inline functions with external linkage, but as it's unspecified which of the multiple definitions of an inline function will be used in the evaluation of a function designator, they are mostly useless

2
  • 1
    True, but you don't say why.
    – C. Ross
    Nov 4 '10 at 12:52
  • Upvoted, but still I have 2 questions. 1, If I want to use a static void foo() in a program, am I supposed to put foo's declaration in the program's .h file or .c file? I ask this question because I'm confused, should .h files only contains extern functions that can be accessed by several .c files not just one? 2, I learned that, inline functions should be defined in .h files, then why should use static inline? Does the static mean the inlined function will only be visible in one .c file?
    – Alcott
    Mar 3 '12 at 3:58
3

Your approach is fine for small programs. Header files are meant for declarations and constant definitions - they provide an interface to the program they "encapsulate". Headers are meant as an interface for other program units.

In case you have more .c files, forward declarations and header files are necessary, because a C function can be defined only once for the whole program (search for one definition rule), even though you may use the function anywhere (in any .c file). If you defined it in a header, it would get included in all .c files you use it in and result in multiple definitions.

3
  • 2
    Even for small programs, I wouldn't recommend defining a non-inline function in a header file. It's a bad habit.
    – Matthieu
    Nov 4 '10 at 12:46
  • @Matthieu: when something is good, it is unclear that doing exactly the opposite is not also good. As I said in comment to DeadMG answer, I do define functions in headers, not as an habit but as an optimization trick and a programming style. Same idea as "headers only" classes of C++, heavily used by BOOST. It would probably be useless if C or C++ had a clean concept of modules understood by compiler (before linking) like other languages have, instead of these bloody text level includes.
    – kriss
    Nov 4 '10 at 13:25
  • @kriss : it can make sense in C++ especially with the constraints of templates/meta-programming (even if you have to consider the compilation time cost as you said), but I cannot see an advantage to header definition in C except for inlining. I agree that the header file construct is a "weak point" for c/c++.
    – Matthieu
    Nov 4 '10 at 13:41
1

It's quicker to do like that, but I personally prefer to have the main function at the beginning of the main file, and put the other functions in other files or below main.

Note that in your example you should avoid declaring foo() in a header file: you won't be able to include it in two different source files. Declare it in the C file containing main(); you won't need to define it elsewhere unless you're referring to it from some other files.

1

Yes, it is easier to define them before main. If you only want to use these functions from within the file, a prototype is not necessary. In that case however, you can also prepend the "static" keyword before the function definition. (In the C file.) That will ensure the function is not visible to other files. (At link time.)

Do not put static keywords in include files.

3
  • But if it is declared static in a header file, every c file that includes this header will have it`s own function, which is not a desirable result unless the function is inline.
    – Matthieu
    Nov 4 '10 at 12:36
  • @Matthieu, hm, that is not what I meant. Nov 4 '10 at 13:22
  • 1
    @Matthieu: if you use classical C programming style, static functions should not appear at all in headers.
    – kriss
    Nov 4 '10 at 13:27
0

You should always prototype.

The reasons for this are;

  1. methodical prototyping produces a succinct list in header files of the functions in the code - this is invaluable to future readers

  2. in anything but the simplest projects, many functions will not have visibility prior to main.

  3. main should be the first function in its file; it's easier for the reader, since we read down, not up

2
  • 1, Include files are for functions that should be exported outside the file, IMHO. 2, I have no idea what that means... 3, or the file containing main() maybe should have very no or very few other functions, like signal handlers. Nov 4 '10 at 13:25
  • When I write libraries, the C files there have a single H file, which is internal to the library; that contains prototypes (which would otherwise be static, if all the C files were rolled into one). That contains a list of library-private functions. With regard to the file containing main, I totally agree.
    – user82238
    Nov 4 '10 at 14:37
0

Why do most programmers declare/prototype the function before main() and define it after main() ?

Merely because most humans read sequentially. Start a story from the beginning, not the middle. Not necessary, just intuitive.

Of course if the code being prototyped is in a separate compilation unit, the prototypes are necessary.

0
0

It is always a good practice to declare the functions in either before main or in a separate header file which will be included in other c files where we have used that function. By doing this we can easily identify all the functions declared/defined in that .C or .H files. And we should use extern key word before declaring the function in header file.

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