45

I found this code in someone's code, it sound like this:

(0, function (arg) { ... })(this)

After I try to play around like below,

(0, function (arg) { console.log(arg) })(2);
console.log((0, 1, 2, 3));
(0, function plus1 (arg) { console.log(arg + 1) }, function plus2 (arg) { console.log(arg + 2) })(5);

I found that it will always return last item in the bracket.

I wonder what is the name of this programming pattern and what is the use case?

5
  • 60
    It’s the comma operator and it’s useful for confusing people. – Ry- Dec 5 '16 at 4:36
  • Yeah, I can see no practical reason for this in that situation... the 0, is literally worthless – qxz Dec 5 '16 at 4:37
  • 2
    Looks like instead of using IIFE directly, this person wanted to make himself look smart :) – Meme Composer Dec 5 '16 at 4:44
  • 10
    it’s useful for confusing people - best description ever – Jaromanda X Dec 5 '16 at 4:48
  • And for interview questions, or for trying to make yourself indispensable since no one understands your code – Mawg says reinstate Monica Dec 5 '16 at 8:38
44

In this particular case it seems superfluous, but sometimes this approach is useful.

For example, with eval:

(function() {
  (0,eval)("var foo = 123"); // indirect call to eval, creates global variable
})();
console.log(foo);            // 123
(function() {
  eval("var bar = 123");     // direct call to eval, creates local variable
})();
console.log(bar);            // ReferenceError

It's also useful when you want to call a method without passing the object as the this value:

var obj = {
  method: function() { return this; }
};
console.log(obj.method() === obj);     // true
console.log((0,obj.method)() === obj); // false

Also note that, depending on the context, it might be the arguments separator instead of a comma operator:

console.log(
  function(a, b) {
    return function() { return a; };
  }
  (0, function (arg) { /* ... */ })(this)
); // 0

5
  • 11
    ... you just gave me a bunch of other reasons to claim that JavaScript design is broken... – Bakuriu Dec 5 '16 at 7:44
  • Wouldn't a better and more readable way to do your second example be obj.method.call(window) ? – Whelkaholism Dec 5 '16 at 9:55
  • 1
    @Whelkaholism It should be obj.method.call(undefined) if you want it to be equivalent in strict mode too. But that requires the function to inherit call from Function.prototype. Not all callable objects inherit from Function.prototype, and even if they do, call could be shadowed. – Oriol Dec 5 '16 at 16:10
  • 2
    Can anyone explain why this works? It appears that javascript wraps a function reference with another function whose first parameter is scope or context? What could you use to replace the 0 that would make the above express true again? – latj May 26 '17 at 19:47
  • 1
    @latj obj.method produces a reference, and thus when you call it, the base obj is used as the this value. But when you use the comma operator (it doesn't matter whether you use 0 or whatever), the reference is resolved into a value. – Oriol Apr 2 '18 at 19:20
2

It is a comma operator wrapped with a self-executing anonymous function. However, I have no idea as to why the meaningless 0 was included except for obfuscation purposes.

1

typical example could be,

for(var i=0,j=10; i < j; i++){
 // code ...
}

comma operator would evaluate expressions from left-to-right and return result of right most expression

// e.g.

var a = 1, b= 2, c = 3, d = function(){ console.log("a => " +  a) }()

2
  • 2
    I think the var a = 1, b = 2, c = 3 is not a "comma operator" but a var declaration. a, b, and c here are created in the local scope so they each are actually declared with a var. To illustrate, here's 2 functions: function foo(){var a = 1, b = 2, c = 3;} function bar(){var a = (1, b = 2, c = 3);}. If you run foo();, a, b, and c would only exist in the local scope. However, if you run bar();, you'll find b and c in the global scope! This is because the (1, b = 2, c = 3) portion is now your "comma operator". – Joseph Shih Dec 12 '18 at 7:41
  • This was the source: i-programmer.info/programming/javascript/… Under the section "This Is Not The Comma You Are Looking For" – Joseph Shih Dec 12 '18 at 7:43

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