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I'm working with legacy code and would like to increase the test coverage for it.

I have a class like:

public class MyStrategy implements SomeStrategy {

    TimeAndDateUtils timeAndDateUtils = new TimeAndDateUtils();

    @Override
    public boolean shouldBeExtracted(Argument argument) {
        Date currentDate = timeAndDateUtils.getCurrentDate();
        return currentDate.isBefore(argument.getDate());
    }

}

I would like to test the shouldBeExtracted-Method an mock the call to timeAndDateUtils.getCurrentDate() so that it returns some fixed value.

So what I'm trying to do is:

Date currentDate = %some fixed date%
TimeAndDateUtils timeAndDateUtils = Mockito.mock(TimeAndDateUtils.class);
Mockito.when(timeAndDateUtils.getCurrentDate()).thenReturn(currentDate);
Assert.assertTrue(myStrategy.shouldBeExtracted(argument))

How can I force the MyStrategy-Class to use the mocked object instead of creating it's own?

4 Answers 4

1

You can use reflection to put mock into MyStrategy object. It would look like this:

MyStrategy myStrategy = new MyStrategy(); // I don't know if you are using DI
MyStrategy.class.getDeclaredField("timeAndDateUtils").set(myStrategy, timeAndDateUtilsMock);
1
  • Thank you for the advice! I found the solution of @kimi82 a bit more elegant.
    – Ira Re
    Commented Dec 5, 2016 at 11:47
1

Assuming that you cannot rewrite the existing code to make it more testable, this is the typical use case for the annotation @InjectMocks allowing to inject mock or spy fields into tested object automatically.

@RunWith(MockitoJUnitRunner.class)
public class MyStrategyTest {
    @Mock
    private TimeAndDateUtils timeAndDateUtils;

    @InjectMocks
    private MyStrategy myStrategy;

    @Test
    public void testShouldBeExtracted() {
        ...
        Mockito.when(timeAndDateUtils.getCurrentDate()).thenReturn(currentDate);
        Assert.assertTrue(myStrategy.shouldBeExtracted(argument));
    }
}
6
  • It's an old Java SE application without any DI
    – Ira Re
    Commented Dec 5, 2016 at 11:44
  • Hello @Nicolas, I'm using Mockito 1.9.x. I use InjectMocks extensively in other projects. I have also tried it in this one, even before asking on stack overflow. For some reasons it didn't work, so I thought, it would have something to do with absolutely lack of DI in this project. But due to your explanations, it should actually have worked. I'll give it another try. Thx, Iryna.
    – Ira Re
    Commented Dec 5, 2016 at 14:13
  • I have just tested the exact same code with Mockito 1.9.5 and it works perfectly Commented Dec 5, 2016 at 14:53
  • make sure to annotate your Test class with @RunWith(MockitoJUnitRunner.class) Commented Dec 5, 2016 at 14:54
  • Hello @Nicolas after annotating myStrategy with @InjectMocks I cannot mock the method call anymore. I get then an error message: when() requires an argument which has to be 'a method call on a mock'.
    – Ira Re
    Commented Dec 8, 2016 at 13:57
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Mockito has a nice class for overriding private objects inside a class. It is called WhiteBox. It works like this

MyStrategy myStrategy = new MyStrategy();
TimeAndDateUtils timeAndDateUtils = Mockito.mock(TimeAndDateUtils.class);
Whitebox.setInternalState(myStartegy, "timeAndDateUtils", timeAndDateUtilsMock);

That will change your TimeAndDateUtils for your mock

5
  • While this would work, it's a bad solution. Instead, the method to be tested can easily be covered by two simple tests, passing an Argument containing a date before/after the current date. No mocking needed.
    – Rogério
    Commented Dec 6, 2016 at 14:41
  • Doing it you are testing 2 pieces of legacy code at the same test. Unless TimeAndDateUtils is part of a known framework/library I wouldn't rely on the TimeAndDateUtils class and I would create tests for both classes not dependent to each other.
    – kimy82
    Commented Dec 7, 2016 at 8:18
  • Well, a decade of experience (and thousands of tests created) taught me that integration tests are always better than isolated unit tests.
    – Rogério
    Commented Dec 13, 2016 at 16:06
  • Both, TDD and BDD are usefull to ensure quality
    – kimy82
    Commented Dec 13, 2016 at 16:16
  • Never used BDD, only TDD. (BDD requires that tests be created with the direct participation of non-technical stakeholders, which in practice is nearly impossible to get.)
    – Rogério
    Commented Dec 13, 2016 at 16:23
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timeAndDateUtils is being created in the class itself which make it difficult to access for test. inject the dependency via constructor so that a mock can be created

public class MyStrategy implements SomeStrategy {

    TimeAndDateUtils timeAndDateUtils;

    public MyStrategy(TimeAndDateUtils timeAndDateUtils) {
        this.timeAndDateUtils = timeAndDateUtils;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean shouldBeExtracted(Argument argument) {
        Date currentDate = timeAndDateUtils.getCurrentDate();
        return currentDate.isBefore(argument.getDate());
    }

}

Test

//Arrange
Date currentDate = %some fixed date%
TimeAndDateUtils timeAndDateUtils = Mockito.mock(TimeAndDateUtils.class);
Mockito.when(timeAndDateUtils.getCurrentDate()).thenReturn(currentDate);

MyStrategy myStrategy = new MyStrategy(timeAndDateUtils);

//Act 
bool result = myStrategy.shouldBeExtracted(argument);

//Assert
Assert.assertTrue(result);
1
  • The class is one of implementations of a common interface "SomeStrategy". I don't like changing the constructor only for one of them. It makes the code even less readable as it already is.
    – Ira Re
    Commented Dec 5, 2016 at 11:46

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