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I have a list of vectors (in Python) that I want to normalize, while at the same time removing the vectors that originally had small norms.

The input list is, e.g.

a = [(1,1),(1,2),(2,2),(3,4)]

And I need the output to be (x*n, y*n) with n = (x**2+y**2)**-0.5

If I just needed the norms, for example, that would be easy with a list comprehension:

an = [ (x**2+y**2)**0.5 for x,y in a ]

It would be also easy to store just a normalized x, too, for example, but what I want is to have this temporary variable "n", to use in two calculations, and then throw it away.

I can't just use a lambda function too because I also need the n to filter the list. So what is the best way?

Right now I am using this nested list comprehension here (with an expression in the inner list):

a = [(1,1),(1,2),(2,2),(3,4)]

[(x*n,y*n) for (n,x,y) in (( (x**2.+y**2.)**-0.5 ,x,y) for x,y in a) if n < 0.4]

# Out[14]: 
# [(0.70710678118654757, 0.70710678118654757),
#  (0.60000000000000009, 0.80000000000000004)]

The inner list generates tuples with an extra value (n), and then I use these values for the calculations and filtering. Is this really the best way? Are there any terrible inefficiencies I should be aware of?

0

4 Answers 4

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Is this really the best way?

Well, it does work efficiently and if you really, really want to write oneliners then it's the best you can do.

On the other hand, a simple 4 line function would do the same much clearer:

def normfilter(vecs, min_norm):
    for x,y in vecs:
        n = (x**2.+y**2.)**-0.5
        if min_norm < n:
            yield (x*n,y*n)

normalized = list(normfilter(vectors, 0.4))

Btw, there is a bug in your code or description - you say you filter out short vectors but your code does the opposite :p

2
  • Thanks, that looks nice. An iterator function is really better for something more complicated like this. Nov 4, 2010 at 17:38
  • About the vector selection, the n is actually the reciprocal of the norm, it's **-0.5, and not **0.5. That is why the multiplication by n instead of a division. That is because I plan to use a specific function to calculate the reciprocal square root approximately, instead of using either exponentiation or e.g. 1/(sqrt(x)). Nov 4, 2010 at 17:42
4

Starting Python 3.8, and the introduction of assignment expressions (PEP 572) (:= operator), it's possible to use a local variable within a list comprehension in order to avoid calling multiple times the same expression:

In our case, we can name the evaluation of (x**2.+y**2.)**-.5 as a variable n while using the result of the expression to filter the list if n is inferior than 0.4; and thus re-use n to produce the mapped value:

# vectors = [(1, 1), (1, 2), (2, 2), (3, 4)]
[(x*n, y*n) for x, y in vectors if (n := (x**2.+y**2.)**-.5) < .4]
# [(0.7071067811865476, 0.7071067811865476), (0.6000000000000001, 0.8)]
1

This suggests using a forloop might be the fastest way. Be sure to check the timeit results on your own machine, as these results can vary depending on a number of factors (hardware, OS, Python version, length of a, etc.).

a = [(1,1),(1,2),(2,2),(3,4)]

def two_lcs(a):
    an = [ ((x**2+y**2)**0.5, x,y) for x,y in a ]
    an = [ (x*n,y*n) for n,x,y in an if n < 0.4 ]
    return an

def using_forloop(a):
    result=[]
    for x,y in a:
        n=(x**2+y**2)**0.5
        if n<0.4:
            result.append((x*n,y*n))
    return result

def using_lc(a):    
    return [(x*n,y*n)
            for (n,x,y) in (( (x**2.+y**2.)**-0.5 ,x,y) for x,y in a) if n < 0.4]

yields these timeit results:

% python -mtimeit -s'import test' 'test.using_forloop(test.a)'
100000 loops, best of 3: 3.29 usec per loop
% python -mtimeit -s'import test' 'test.two_lcs(test.a)'
100000 loops, best of 3: 4.52 usec per loop
% python -mtimeit -s'import test' 'test.using_lc(test.a)'
100000 loops, best of 3: 6.97 usec per loop
2
  • Don't conflate "best way" with "fastest way". If performance is the biggest issue, he should probably be using numpy anyway. Nov 4, 2010 at 15:22
  • @Glenn the Numpy Way is definitely better, I was just curious about how to solve that using list comprehensions, iterators, etc... Nov 4, 2010 at 18:18
1

Stealing the code from unutbu, here is a larger test including a numpy version and the iterator version. Notice that converting the list to numpy can cost some time.

import numpy

# a = [(1,1),(1,2),(2,2),(3,4)]
a=[]
for k in range(1,10):
    for j in range(1,10):
        a.append( (float(k),float(j)) )

npa = numpy.array(a)

def two_lcs(a):
    an = [ ((x**2+y**2)**-0.5, x,y) for x,y in a ]
    an = [ (x*n,y*n) for n,x,y in an if n < 5.0 ]
    return an

def using_iterator(a):
    def normfilter(vecs, min_norm):
        for x,y in vecs:
            n = (x**2.+y**2.)**-0.5
            if n < min_norm:
                yield (x*n,y*n)

    return list(normfilter(a, 5.0))

def using_forloop(a):
    result=[]
    for x,y in a:
        n=(x**2+y**2)**-0.5
        if n<5.0:
            result.append((x*n,y*n))
    return result

def using_lc(a):    
    return [(x*n,y*n)
            for (n,x,y) in (( (x**2.+y**2.)**-0.5 ,x,y) for x,y in a) if n < 5.0]


def using_numpy(npa):
    n = (npa[:,0]**2+npa[:,1]**2)**-0.5
    where = n<5.0
    npa = npa[where]
    n = n[where]
    npa[:,0]=npa[:,0]*n
    npa[:,1]=npa[:,1]*n
    return( npa )

and the result...

nlw@pathfinder:~$ python -mtimeit -s'import test' 'test.two_lcs(test.a)'
10000 loops, best of 3: 65.8 usec per loop
nlw@pathfinder:~$ python -mtimeit -s'import test' 'test.using_lc(test.a)'
10000 loops, best of 3: 65.6 usec per loop
nlw@pathfinder:~$ python -mtimeit -s'import test' 'test.using_forloop(test.a)'
10000 loops, best of 3: 64.1 usec per loop
nlw@pathfinder:~$ python -mtimeit -s'import test' 'test.using_iterator(test.a)'
10000 loops, best of 3: 59.6 usec per loop
nlw@pathfinder:~$ python -mtimeit -s'import test' 'test.using_numpy(test.npa)'
10000 loops, best of 3: 48.7 usec per loop

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