4

There is a giving number N , i have to find out the number of integer for which the repetitive division with N gives quotient one.

For Ex:

N=8
Numbers Are 2 as: 8/2=4/2=2/2=1
            5 as  8/5=1
            6 as  8/6=1 
            7 and 8

My Aprroach: All the numbers from N/2+1 to N gives me quotient 1 so

Ans: N/2 + Check Numbers from (2, sqrt(N))

Time Complexity O(sqrt(N))

Is there any better ways to do this, since number can be upto 10^12 and there can many queries ?

Can it be O(1) or O(40) (because 2^40 exceeds 10^12)

1
  • Note: N/2 + Check Numbers from (2, sqrt(N)) --> (N + 1)/2 + Check Numbers from (2, sqrt(N)) Example N==3. – chux - Reinstate Monica Dec 5 '16 at 20:14
0

A test harness to verify functionality and assess order of complexity.

Edit as needed - its wiki

#include <math.h>
#include <stdio.h>

unsigned long long nn = 0;

unsigned repeat_div(unsigned n, unsigned d) {
  for (;;) {
    nn++;
    unsigned q = n / d;
    if (q <= 1) return q;
    n = q;
  }
  return 0;
}

unsigned num_repeat_div2(unsigned n) {
  unsigned count = 0;
  for (unsigned d = 2; d <= n; d++) {
    count += repeat_div(n, d);
  }
  return count;
}

unsigned num_repeat_div2_NM(unsigned n) {
  unsigned count = 0;
  if (n > 1) {
    count += (n + 1) / 2;
    unsigned hi = (unsigned) sqrt(n);
    for (unsigned d = 2; d <= hi; d++) {
      count += repeat_div(n, d);
    }
  }
  return count;
}

unsigned num_repeat_div2_test(unsigned n) {
  // number of integers that repetitive division with n gives quotient one.
  unsigned count = 0;

  // increment nn per code' tightest loop
  ...

  return count;
}

///

unsigned (*method_rd[])(unsigned) = { num_repeat_div2, num_repeat_div2_NM,
    num_repeat_div2_test};
#define RD_N (sizeof method_rd/sizeof method_rd[0])

unsigned test_rd(unsigned n, unsigned long long *iteration) {
  unsigned count = 0;
  for (unsigned i = 0; i < RD_N; i++) {
    nn = 0;
    unsigned this_count =  method_rd[i](n);
    iteration[i] += nn;
    if (i > 0 && this_count != count) {
      printf("Oops %u %u %u\n", i, count, this_count);
      exit(-1);
    }
    count = this_count;
    // printf("rd[%u](%u)      = %u.  Iterations:%llu\n", i, n, cnt, nn);
  }

  return count;
}

void tests_rd(unsigned lo, unsigned hi) {
  unsigned long long total_iterations[RD_N] = {0};
  unsigned long long total_count = 0;
  for (unsigned n = lo; n <= hi; n++) {
    total_count += test_rd(n, total_iterations);
  }
  for (unsigned i = 0; i < RD_N; i++) {
    printf("Sum rd(%u,%u) --> %llu.  total Iterations %llu\n", lo, hi,
        total_count, total_iterations[i]);
  }
}

int main(void) {
  tests_rd(2, 10 * 1000);
  return 0;
}
0

If you'd like O(1) lookup per query, the hash table of naturals less than or equal 10^12 that are powers of other naturals will not be much larger than 2,000,000 elements; create it by iterating on the bases from 1 to 1,000,000, incrementing the value of seen keys; roots 1,000,000...10,001 need only be squared; roots 10,000...1,001 need only be cubed; after that, as has been mentioned, there can be at most 40 operations at the smallest root.

Each value in the table will represent the number of base/power configurations (e.g., 512 -> 2, corresponding to 2^9 and 8^3).

0

First off, your algorithm is not O(sqrt(N)), as you are ignoring the number of times you divide by each of the checked numbers. If the number being checked is k, the number of divisions before the result is obtained (by the method described above) is O(log(k)). Hence the complexity becomes N/2 + (log(2) + log(3) + ... + log(sqrt(N)) = O(log(N) * sqrt(N)).

Now that we have got that out of the way, the algorithm may be improved. Observe that, by repeated division and you will get a 1 for a checked number k only when k^t <= N < 2 * k^t where t=floor(log_k(N)).

That is, when k^t <= N < 2 * k^(t+1). Note the strict < on the right-side.

Now, to figure out t, you can use the Newton-Raphson method or the Taylor's series to get logarithms very quickly and a complexity measure is mentioned here. Let us call that C(N). So the complexity will be C(2) + C(3) + .... + C(sqrt(N)). If you can ignore the cost of computing the log, you can get this to O(sqrt(N)).

For example, in the above case for N=8:

  • 2^3 <= 8 < 2 * 2^3 : 1
  • floor(log_3(8)) = 1 and 8 does not satisfy 3^1 <= 8 < 2 * 3^1: 0
  • floor(log_4(8)) = 1 and 8 does not satisfy 4^1 <= 8 < 2 * 4^1 : 0
  • 4 extra coming in from numbers 5, 6, 7 and 8 as 8 t=1 for these numbers.

Note that we did not need to check for 3 and 4, but I have done so to illustrate the point. And you can verify that each of the numbers in [N/2..N] satisfies the above inequality and hence need to be added.

If you use this approach, we can eliminate the repeated divisions and get the complexity down to O(sqrt(N)) if the complexity of computing logarithms can be assumed negligible.

-1

Let's see since number can be upto 10^12 , what you can do is Create for number 2 to 10^6 , you can create and Array of 40 , so for each length check if the number can be expressed as i^(len-1)+ y where i is between 2 to 10^6 and len is between 1 to 40.

So time complexity O(40*Query)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.