251

Can an ordered list produce results that looks like 1.1, 1.2, 1.3 (instead of just 1, 2, 3, ...) with CSS? So far, using list-style-type:decimal has produced only 1, 2, 3, not 1.1, 1.2., 1.3.

4
  • I'd suggest to compare the accepted answer with that by Jakub Jirutka. I think the latter is even much better. Jul 12, 2018 at 16:17
  • Elegant solution. Any idea why Wikipedia uses a ul for its content sections instead of this?
    – Mattypants
    Jul 15, 2018 at 22:21
  • 1
    @davnicwil I agree; looks like I probably just applied the duplicate in the wrong order back in September.
    – TylerH
    Jul 3, 2019 at 14:02
  • Cool, now I feel awkward as it never occurred to me it could be a simple error like that - apologies!
    – davnicwil
    Jul 3, 2019 at 17:06

12 Answers 12

345

You can use counters to do so:

The following style sheet numbers nested list items as "1", "1.1", "1.1.1", etc.

OL { counter-reset: item }
LI { display: block }
LI:before { content: counters(item, ".") " "; counter-increment: item }

Example

ol { counter-reset: item }
li{ display: block }
li:before { content: counters(item, ".") " "; counter-increment: item }
<ol>
  <li>li element
    <ol>
      <li>sub li element</li>
      <li>sub li element</li>
      <li>sub li element</li>
    </ol>
  </li>
  <li>li element</li>
  <li>li element
    <ol>
      <li>sub li element</li>
      <li>sub li element</li>
      <li>sub li element</li>
    </ol>
  </li>
</ol>

See Nested counters and scope for more information.

11
  • 2
    great answer. What is the support for this? Nov 5, 2010 at 12:03
  • 1
    @Jason McCreary: Well, that’s the down side: Counters are not supported in IE until version 8.
    – Gumbo
    Nov 5, 2010 at 13:45
  • 3
    This solution misses one tiny thing: the dot following the item number. It doesn't look like the standard list style. Fix by adding a dot to the rule for li:before: content: counters(item, ".")". "; Jan 20, 2014 at 14:09
  • 4
    This is a poor answer. It doesn't work properly. Check out the answer by Jakub Jirutka below
    – Mr Pablo
    Oct 28, 2014 at 17:26
  • 1
    @Gumbo I know, and the answer by Jakub gave me the correct numbering.
    – Mr Pablo
    Oct 29, 2014 at 10:52
320

None of solutions on this page works correctly and universally for all levels and long (wrapped) paragraphs. It’s really tricky to achieve a consistent indentation due to variable size of marker (1., 1.2, 1.10, 1.10.5, …); it can’t be just “faked,” not even with a precomputed margin/padding for each possible indentation level.

I finally figured out a solution that actually works and doesn’t need any JavaScript.

It’s tested on Firefox 32, Chromium 37, IE 9 and Android Browser. Doesn't work on IE 7 and previous.

CSS:

ol {
  list-style-type: none;
  counter-reset: item;
  margin: 0;
  padding: 0;
}

ol > li {
  display: table;
  counter-increment: item;
  margin-bottom: 0.6em;
}

ol > li:before {
  content: counters(item, ".") ". ";
  display: table-cell;
  padding-right: 0.6em;    
}

li ol > li {
  margin: 0;
}

li ol > li:before {
  content: counters(item, ".") " ";
}

Example: Example

Try it on JSFiddle, fork it on Gist.

8
  • 2
    Good job achieving this type of indention. I would still argue however that the first 2 cases of indentation that you've listed are a matter of preference rather than right and wrong. Consider case 1 and case 2 -- the latter manages to squeeze in a lot more levels before the spacing becomes unwieldy, while still looking pretty neat. Furthermore, MS Word and default browser styling both use case 2 indentation. I guess they are also doing it wrong? Jan 29, 2015 at 23:40
  • 4
    @saul-fautley It’s wrong in terms of typography. Your example with insane number of nested levels demonstrates that nested numbering is not suitable for too many levels, but that’s pretty obvious. MS Words isn’t a typesetting system, it’s a mere document processor with poor typography. Default browser styling… oh, you don’t know much about typography, do you? Jan 29, 2015 at 23:59
  • 4
    It really does work (technically) for all levels and long paragraphs. If it's reasonable to use dozen levels, that's another question that has nothing to do with the technical solution. The point is that you don't have to predefine a CSS rule for each nesting level like with some other solutions. Jan 30, 2015 at 1:18
  • 4
    While I wouldn't say there's anything inherently "wrong" with the other answers, I would say they are incomplete. This answer is spot on, and even worked in a horrifically bizarrely styled site I am amending.
    – DanielM
    Mar 30, 2015 at 16:13
  • 2
    @tremby: The discrepancy can be solved by making the li use "display: table-row" instead of "display: table". The problem this brings is that the li then can't use any margins/paddings as table-rows are always sized automatically by their content. This can be worked around by adding an "li:after" with "display: block". See jsFiddle for a full example. As an extra bonus I added "text-align: right" to "li:before" to make the numbers right aligned.
    – mmlr
    Dec 14, 2017 at 12:28
72

The chosen answer is a great start, but it essentially forces list-style-position: inside; styling on the list items, making wrapped text hard to read. Here's a simple workaround that also gives control over the margin between the number and text, and right-aligns the number as per the default behaviour.

ol {
    counter-reset: item;
}
ol li {
    display: block;
    position: relative;
}
ol li:before {
    content: counters(item, ".")".";
    counter-increment: item;
    position: absolute;
    margin-right: 100%;
    right: 10px; /* space between number and text */
}

JSFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/3J4Bu/

2
  • One downside is it adds a period to the end of each list item. Aug 11, 2014 at 23:03
  • 3
    @Davin Studer: It only adds a period to the end of each number, as per the default ol behaviour. It can easily be removed by deleting the last "." from the content property, but this just looks a bit odd to me. Aug 12, 2014 at 18:20
20

The solutions posted here did not work well for me, so I did a mixture of the ones of this question and the following question: Is it possible to create multi-level ordered list in HTML?

/* Numbered lists like 1, 1.1, 2.2.1... */
ol li {display:block;} /* hide original list counter */
ol > li:first-child {counter-reset: item;} /* reset counter */
ol > li {counter-increment: item; position: relative;} /* increment counter */
ol > li:before {content:counters(item, ".") ". "; position: absolute; margin-right: 100%; right: 10px;} /* print counter */

Result:

screenshot

Note: the screenshot, if you wish to see the source code or whatever is from this post: http://estiloasertivo.blogspot.com.es/2014/08/introduccion-running-lean-y-lean.html

2
  • This solution looks good after 9 li items coz other solutions had some spacing issue with 2 digit numbers. Thanks Dec 10, 2021 at 14:44
  • I initially upvoted, this answer, but then I noticed rendering issues in Chrome. It was intermittent, and seemed to occur further down the list, where the counters weren't resetting for some reason. Would be okay on one view, refresh the numbers would be long without a reset. No idea why. Jakub's answer worked for me.
    – crdunst
    Jul 18 at 11:17
8

Note: Use CSS counters to create nested numbering in a modern browser. See the accepted answer. The following is for historical interest only.


If the browser supports content and counter,

.foo {
  counter-reset: foo;
}
.foo li {
  list-style-type: none;
}
.foo li::before {
  counter-increment: foo;
  content: "1." counter(foo) " ";
}
<ol class="foo">
  <li>uno</li>
  <li>dos</li>
  <li>tres</li>
  <li>cuatro</li>
</ol>

3
  • This solution fails horribly when the lists are nested. Jan 20, 2014 at 14:12
  • @LS You can always accommodate the selectors to suit your need. .foo > ol > li.
    – kennytm
    Jan 20, 2014 at 14:21
  • 2
    My point is that you've hard-coded "1." into the style. What happens when the sublist is a child of the second item in the parent list? You want it to appear as "2.", but it will always be "1." because of the way it's coded here. What's the solution? Make new sets of styles for every possible number? No. Use the counters() function as in the examples above instead of the counter() function. Jan 20, 2014 at 21:07
4

The following worked for me:

ol {
  list-style-type: none;
  counter-reset: item;
  margin: 0;
  padding: 0;
}

ol > li {
  display: table;
  counter-increment: item;
  margin-bottom: 0.6em;
}

ol > li:before {
  content: counters(item, ".") ") ";
  display: table-cell;
  padding-right: 0.6em;
}

li ol > li {
  margin: 0;
}

li ol > li:before {
  content: counters(item, ".") ") ";
}

Look at: http://jsfiddle.net/rLebz84u/2/

or this one http://jsfiddle.net/rLebz84u/3/ with more and justified text

0
3

In the near future you may be able to use the ::marker psuedo-element to achieve the same result as other solutions in just one line of code.

Remember to check the Browser Compatibility Table as this is still an experimental technology. At the moment of writing only Firefox and Firefox for Android, starting from version 68, support this.

Here is a snippet that will render correctly if tried in a compatible browser:

::marker { content: counters(list-item,'.') ':' }
li { padding-left: 0.5em }
<ol>
  <li>li element
    <ol>
      <li>sub li element</li>
      <li>sub li element</li>
      <li>sub li element</li>
    </ol>
  </li>
  <li>li element</li>
  <li>li element
    <ol>
      <li>sub li element</li>
      <li>sub li element</li>
      <li>sub li element</li>
    </ol>
  </li>
</ol>

You may also want to check out this great article by smashingmagazine on the topic.

2
<html>
    <head>
        <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
        <meta name="author" content="Sandro Alvares - KingRider">
    </head>
    <body>
        <style type="text/css">
            li.title { 
                font-size: 20px; 
                font-weight: lighter; 
                padding: 15px; 
                counter-increment: ordem; 
            }
            .foo { 
                counter-reset: foo; 
                padding-left: 15px; 
            }
            .foo li { 
                list-style-type: none; 
            }
            .foo li:before { 
                counter-increment: foo; 
                content: counter(ordem) "." counter(foo) " "; 
            }
        </style>
        <ol>
            <li class="title">TITLE ONE</li>
            <ol class="foo">
                <li>text 1 one</li>
                <li>text 1 two</li>
                <li>text 1 three</li>
                <li>text 1 four</li>
            </ol>
            <li class="title">TITLE TWO</li>
            <ol class="foo">
                <li>text 2 one</li>
                <li>text 2 two</li>
                <li>text 2 three</li>
                <li>text 2 four</li>
            </ol>
            <li class="title">TITLE THREE</li>
            <ol class="foo">
                <li>text 3 one</li>
                <li>text 3 two</li>
                <li>text 3 three</li>
                <li>text 3 four</li>
            </ol>
        </ol>
    </body>
</html>

Result: http://i.stack.imgur.com/78bN8.jpg

2

I have some problem when there are two lists and second one is inside DIV Second list should start at 1. not 2.1

<ol>
    <li>lorem</li>
    <li>lorem ipsum</li>
</ol>

<div>
    <ol>
        <li>lorem (should be 1.)</li>
        <li>lorem ipsum ( should be 2.)</li>
    </ol>
</div>

http://jsfiddle.net/3J4Bu/364/

EDIT: I solved the problem by this http://jsfiddle.net/hy5f6161/

0
1

this is proper code if you want to first child li resize of other css.

<style>
    li.title { 
        font-size: 20px; 

        counter-increment: ordem; 
        color:#0080B0;
    }
    .my_ol_class { 
        counter-reset: my_ol_class; 
        padding-left: 30px !important; 
    }
    .my_ol_class li { 
          display: block;
        position: relative;

    }
    .my_ol_class li:before { 
        counter-increment: my_ol_class; 
        content: counter(ordem) "." counter(my_ol_class) " "; 
        position: absolute;
        margin-right: 100%;
        right: 10px; /* space between number and text */
    }
    li.title ol li{
         font-size: 15px;
         color:#5E5E5E;
    }
</style>

in html file.

        <ol>
            <li class="title"> <p class="page-header list_title">Acceptance of Terms. </p>
                <ol class="my_ol_class">
                    <li> 
                        <p>
                            my text 1.
                        </p>
                    </li>
                    <li>
                        <p>
                            my text 2.
                        </p>
                    </li>
                </ol>
            </li>
        </ol>
0

I was after adding numbered list to Python Markdown's TOC Extension.

I did something like this:

.toc ul { counter-reset: outItem; list-style: none }
.toc ul > li{ counter-reset: nestedItem }
.toc ul > li:before { content: counters(outItem, ".") ". "; counter-increment: outItem; margin-left: -2em; }

I am not sure it is the correct way, but it worked for me.

0

I needed to add this to the solution posted in 12 as I was using a list with a mixture of ordered list and unordered lists components. content: no-close-quote seems like an odd thing to add I know, but it works...

ol ul li:before {
  content: no-close-quote;
  counter-increment: none;
  display: list-item;
  margin-right: 100%;
  position: absolute;
  right: 10px;
}
0

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