0

Is a bit shift (of at least 1 position) on a short or byte faster (require fewer CPU cycles) than a bit shift on an integer (for AMD64 or x86 architecture)? I suspect that the answer is no because the same 32 or 64 bit CPU instruction will be used in both cases and both will take the same amount of clock cycles. Is that true?

  • 3
    What do the benchmarks on your hardware say? What machine code is emitted for your use cases? – tadman Dec 5 '16 at 22:34
  • The best bet here is to benchmark an example that represents your problem properly. There are many issues unrelated with cycles consumed by a single instruction that can speed up or slow down your program (load/stores, simd, etc.). – Jorge Bellon Dec 5 '16 at 22:46
  • Is a bit shift (of at least 1 position) on a short or byte faster (require fewer CPU cycles) than a bit shift on an integer (for AMD64 or x86 architecture)? No. – drescherjm Dec 5 '16 at 22:46
  • superuser.com/a/643453/76204 – drescherjm Dec 5 '16 at 22:50
  • Answer to your question is rather no, 32 bit x86 CPUs stores bytes/shorts as 32 bit variables, but considering one instruction performance on modern CPU with pipes, superscalar and speculative execution does not have any sense. – Michał Mielec Dec 5 '16 at 22:56
2

It depends. Generally speaking, if you have an N-bit processor, then most likely anything up to N bits will take the same time to shift, larger variables take longer. If you are doing operations on bytes, but want to ensure you use a suitably sized integer for speed, then use the type uint_fast8_t.

But: if you do bit shifting in a loop, then the compiler might be able to vectorize your code. If you have a processor with SSE2 instructions, it can do 8 16-bit shifts in one instruction. If you have AVX or even AVX512, then it can do 16 or even 32 16-bit shifts in one instruction. However, whether this is more efficient than using regular instructions depends on how easy it is to load many variables into SSE registers, and if you do more operations than just bit shifts on them.

It is instructive to look at the assembler output from the compiler (for example, use gcc -save-temps to compile your program and look at the resulting .s file). Note that the optimization level chosen has a very large impact on the generated assembler.

The best way to determine what the fastest variable size is is just to measure it.

2

My hypothesis is that shifts on 8-bit or 16-bit (unsigned) integers is the same as bit shifts on 32-bit quantities on 32-bit word machines.

Most 32-bit word size processors operate internally on 32-bit quantities. The barrel shifter, the Arithmetic Unit, etc., are designed for 32-bit operations. The data fetching mechanism would convert the 8-bit or 16-bit quantity into a 32-bit quantity before the shift operation takes place. A 32-bit quantity does not require any adjustments, so there may be a slight delay with the smaller sized integers.

On the other hand, there could be processors that have special data paths for 8-bit or 16-bit sized integers.

The way to verify is to profile on your system and other target systems.

Also, ask yourself if the execution time difference is important or significant.

1

The code that I posted earlier was incorrect. Although the code contained a shift, since the result was not stored, the compiler simply skipped it. Here's a simple int example:

void main() {
    int value = 0;
    value = value << 3;
}

Short example:

void foo() {
    short value = 0;
    value = value << 3;
}

Integer example generates:

    .file   "main.c"
    .text
    .globl  _Z3foov
    .def    _Z3foov;    .scl    2;  .type   32; .endef
    .seh_proc   _Z3foov
_Z3foov:
.LFB0:
    pushq   %rbp
    .seh_pushreg    %rbp
    movq    %rsp, %rbp
    .seh_setframe   %rbp, 0
    subq    $16, %rsp
    .seh_stackalloc 16
    .seh_endprologue
    movl    $0, -4(%rbp)
    sall    $3, -4(%rbp)
    nop
    addq    $16, %rsp
    popq    %rbp
    ret
    .seh_endproc
    .ident  "GCC: (GNU) 5.4.0"

Short example generates:

    .file   "main.c"
    .text
    .globl  _Z3foov
    .def    _Z3foov;    .scl    2;  .type   32; .endef
    .seh_proc   _Z3foov
_Z3foov:
.LFB0:
    pushq   %rbp
    .seh_pushreg    %rbp
    movq    %rsp, %rbp
    .seh_setframe   %rbp, 0
    subq    $16, %rsp
    .seh_stackalloc 16
    .seh_endprologue
    movw    $0, -2(%rbp)
    movswl  -2(%rbp), %eax
    sall    $3, %eax
    movw    %ax, -2(%rbp)
    nop
    addq    $16, %rsp
    popq    %rbp
    ret
    .seh_endproc
    .ident  "GCC: (GNU) 5.4.0"

Short example executes:

movw    $0, -2(%rbp)
movswl  -2(%rbp), %eax
sall    $3, %eax
movw    %ax, -2(%rbp)

Integer example executes:

movl    $0, -4(%rbp)
sall    $3, -4(%rbp)

So it looks like without any compiler optimization, the integer shift is actually faster.

  • What about other processors, such as the ARM series? – Thomas Matthews Dec 5 '16 at 23:18
  • 1
    Dude, no shift is even being performed in either of those functions, they both just store zero in a local variable, with 2 different frame offsets for the 2 different sizes. – Christopher Oicles Dec 5 '16 at 23:26
  • The answer is both (if you actually shift which this example does not) will take 1 clock tick (or less) to do the shft unless there is a pipeline stall on a modern x86 processor. – drescherjm Dec 6 '16 at 1:21
  • This is -O0 code anyway so it doesn't count – harold Dec 6 '16 at 10:07

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.