202

How do I check if a number is positive or negative in C#?

16 Answers 16

202
bool positive = number > 0;
bool negative = number < 0;
  • 17
    What about poor old negative zero?! – Grant Crofton Nov 4 '10 at 17:30
  • 6
    By definition, zero is not positive: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/0_(number) – Simon Fischer Nov 4 '10 at 17:33
  • 1
    @SimonFischer There are definitely branches of mathematics, computer science, also regular science which use a negative and positive zero. Chemists and physicists for example will sometimes use -0 for a number which was negative and rounded to zero. Definitions only have meaning within a context. When you treat the mathematical definitions you were taught as though they are truly universal you risk ending up in a different mathematical context where you are wrong. – VoronoiPotato Oct 8 '18 at 20:48
  • can't believe i just googled this. – David Seek 2 days ago
173

Of course no-one's actually given the correct answer,

num != 0   // num is positive *or* negative!
  • 1
    no, OP asked if is positive or is negative not is (positive or negative) – T.Todua May 11 '18 at 12:53
  • 0 still positive – Jude Bautista Sep 26 '18 at 8:02
  • @T.Todua I believe that was the joke. – NetherGranite Jul 5 at 6:34
82

OVERKILL!

public static class AwesomeExtensions
{
    public static bool IsPositive(this int number)
    {
        return number > 0;
    }

    public static bool IsNegative(this int number)
    {
        return number < 0;
    }

    public static bool IsZero(this int number)
    {
        return number == 0;
    }

    public static bool IsAwesome(this int number)
    {
        return IsNegative(number) && IsPositive(number) && IsZero(number);
    }
}
  • 25
    I'm thinking about refactoring this with some delegates... – hunter Nov 4 '10 at 17:33
  • 25
    Internally, it should instantiate a class which implements ISignDeterminator using a SignDeterminatorFactory. – Jesse C. Slicer Nov 4 '10 at 17:47
  • 10
    Incomplete: you should check for IsNaN() as well ;) – slashmais Nov 4 '10 at 17:55
  • 3
    @slashmais: On an int?! What magical land of C# are you working in? – Jeff Yates Nov 4 '10 at 18:01
  • 32
    Where are the unit tests...? – NotDan Nov 4 '10 at 19:27
56
num < 0 // number is negative
  • 12
    I assume that this is a beginner, which we should try to help. Once you learn the right way -- check this for the wrong way thedailywtf.com/Articles/… – Lou Franco Nov 4 '10 at 17:27
  • 1
    at first I could'nt believe the question on the main page, then I came here ... :) and this guy is not alone ... oh dear :) – slashmais Nov 4 '10 at 17:41
55

The Math.Sign method is one way to go. It will return -1 for negative numbers, 1 for positive numbers, and 0 for values equal to zero (i.e. zero has no sign). Double and single precision variables will cause an exception (ArithmeticException) to be thrown if they equal NaN.

  • Wow didn't know this exists.What happens for NaN? – Tanmoy Nov 4 '10 at 19:06
  • @Tanmoy: Looks like it will throw an exception in that case. – gnovice Nov 4 '10 at 19:07
  • But then he has to check if the result of Math.Sign is positive or negative too! Does he use Math.Sign for that as well? ;) – AndrewC May 15 '11 at 20:31
  • 3
    @AndyC: I enjoyed the humor, but he should be doing equality comparison against the return value of Math.Sign (since it explicitly defines possible return values.) – Rob Oct 16 '11 at 22:52
  • 1
    Very surprised to find out there's actually a function for this. – l46kok Oct 8 '13 at 15:15
24

This is the industry standard:

int is_negative(float num)
{
  char *p = (char*) malloc(20);
  sprintf(p, "%f", num);
  return p[0] == '-';
}
  • 2
  • 5
    I tried it out. My program ran eventually out of memory. Could there be a leak in your code? – Thomas Tempelmann Oct 1 '15 at 15:58
  • 4
    @Will, well done for spotting this very obscure leak! Though I frown upon you changing the meaning of the original poster's introductory sentence. I still believe it's correct to call this the industry standard. Hence, to keep with the spirit of this answer, and with respect to the original poster, I've reverted your edit, okay? – Thomas Tempelmann Jan 20 '16 at 10:58
  • 4
    @Will, do I really need to state the obvious about the original post and my comments, which got upvotes while yours doesn't? (Spoiler: it has to do with sarcasm, and yours doesn't, which means you've killed the joke that bad existed here - or do you really think that this answer was meant to be taken seriously??) – Thomas Tempelmann Jan 20 '16 at 22:57
  • 2
    There we go, reverted, flagged, and downvoted. I wasn't aware this was a joke. – Will Jan 20 '16 at 23:06
19

You youngins and your fancy less-than signs.

Back in my day we had to use Math.abs(num) != num //number is negative !

  • (If it wasn't obvious, this was intended to be humor) – Powerlord Nov 4 '10 at 17:31
  • 4
    Does this code work for all signed integers? – Eric Lippert Nov 5 '10 at 6:10
  • 2
    @Eric: No, because it will throw an OverflowException if num is MinValue for whatever type is passed in (Int16, Int32, Int64). Results are even worse for floating point values, where they could also be NaN, since NaN != NaN. – Powerlord Nov 5 '10 at 13:35
10
    public static bool IsPositive<T>(T value)
        where T : struct, IComparable<T>
    {
        return value.CompareTo(default(T)) > 0;
    }
8

Native programmer's version. Behaviour is correct for little-endian systems.

bool IsPositive(int number)
{
   bool result = false;
   IntPtr memory = IntPtr.Zero;
   try
   {
       memory = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(4);
       if (memory == IntPtr.Zero)
           throw new OutOfMemoryException();

       Marshal.WriteInt32(memory, number);

       result = (Marshal.ReadByte(memory, 3) & 0x80) == 0;
   }
   finally
   {
       if (memory != IntPtr.Zero)
           Marshal.FreeHGlobal(memory);
   }
   return result;
}

Do not ever use this.

  • 7
    "Do not ever use this"? But it's enterprise-quality code, perfect for enterprise software! You're missing IsPositiveChecker, IsPositiveCheckerInterface, IsPositiveCheckerFactory, and IsPositiveCheckerFactoryInterface, though. – Tim Čas Sep 10 '15 at 10:59
  • Just used this in my Hello World console app. 10/10 would do it again. – Vahid Amiri Aug 24 '16 at 18:09
  • you are missing a set of parenthesis as '&' has a lower precedence than '==', so you should have result = (Marshal.ReadByte(memory, 3) & 0x80) == 0; instead. Also, you should have a return result; somewhere in there at the end so it will actually return the result. – Dragonrage Jan 4 at 17:28
  • @Dragonrage Thanks, good catch. – Polynomial Jan 10 at 18:03
6
if (num < 0) {
  //negative
}
if (num > 0) {
  //positive
}
if (num == 0) {
  //neither positive or negative,
}

or use "else ifs"

6

For a 32-bit signed integer, such as System.Int32, aka int in C#:

bool isNegative = (num & (1 << 31)) != 0;
5
public static bool IsNegative<T>(T value)
   where T : struct, IComparable<T>
{
    return value.CompareTo(default(T)) < 0;
}
5

You just have to compare if the value & its absolute value are equal:

if (value == Math.abs(value))
    return "Positif"
else return "Negatif"
5
bool isNegative(int n) {
  int i;
  for (i = 0; i <= Int32.MaxValue; i++) {
    if (n == i) 
      return false;
  }
  return true;
}
3
int j = num * -1;

if (j - num  == j)
{
     // Num is equal to zero
}
else if (j < i)
{
      // Num is positive
}
else if (j > i) 
{
     // Num is negative
}
1

This code takes advantage of SIMD instructions to improve performance.

public static bool IsPositive(int n)
{
  var v = new Vector<int>(n);
  var result = Vector.GreaterThanAll(v, Vector<int>.Zero);
  return result;
}

protected by Chris Morgan Oct 22 '15 at 6:07

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