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I had a question when providing an API

if I ask for them to give me a _int64 10 digit hexadecimal number but my function internally takes strings how do I effectively convert that...

as of right now I was just using string internally but for compatibility reasons i was using char* c style so that give any system 32 or 64 it wouldn't matter. Is that the accurate thing to do? or am i wrong?

is there a problem using char* vs _int64?

  • This question makes no sense. Why does the number of bits in the machine determine whether or not it can use proper C++ strings? What are you really asking? – underscore_d Nov 7 '17 at 16:20
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#include <string>
#include <sstream>

int main()
{
  std::stringstream stream;
  __int64 value(1000000000);
  stream << value;    
  std::string strValue(stream.str());
  return 0;
}
8

C++11 standardized the std::to_string function:

#include <string>

int main()
{
  int64_t value = 128;
  std::string asString = std::to_string(value);
  return 0;
}
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The best option is to change the function to not use strings anymore so you can pass the original __int64 as-is. __int64 works the same in 32-bit and 64-bit systems.

If you have to convert to a string, there are several options. Steve showed you how to use a stringstream, which is the C++ way to do it. You can also use the C sprintf() or _i64toa() functions:

__int64 value = ...;
char buffer[20];
sprintf(buffer, "%Ld", value);

__int64 value = ...;
char buffer[20];
_i64toa(value, buffer, 10);
  • i was inder the impression that char * was a basic unit that was the same under 32 and 64 bit. is that not true? just curious. Also in the case where i am reading from stdin like argc and argv (which uses char*) that is just one case not to mention there is a ton of stuff i can do internally with the std string class at the moment. – Dave Powell Nov 4 '10 at 18:17
  • char as a data type is the same in 32-bit and 64-bit, but a pointer to a char is different (4 bytes vs 8 bytes), though its semantics (a memory address of a char value) is the same. – Remy Lebeau Nov 5 '10 at 3:05

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