28

Say I've got some TextBlocks on my UI, something like so:

<StackPanel Orientation="Vertical">
    <TextBlock Text="{Binding DessertIndex}" />
    <TextBlock Text="{Binding Food[2]}" />
    <TextBlock Text="{Binding Food[{Binding DessertIndex}]}" />
</StackPanel>

and in my code behind I've got something like this:

public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    public int DessertIndex
    {
        get { return 2; }
    }

    public object[] Food
    {
        get
        {
            return new object[]{"liver", "spam", "cake", "garlic" };
        }
    }

    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        DataContext = this;
    }
}

The first two TextBlocks display fine for me, displaying 2 and 'cake' respectively. The third one doesn't accomplish what I'd like, namely use the DessertIndex property to index into that array and also display 'cake'. I did a little searching here on SO for a similar question but didn't find one. Ultimately, I don't want to specify values like 2 in my .xaml file and would like to rely upon a property instead for indexing into that array. Is this possible? If so, what am I doing wrong here?


EDIT:

So what I more closely have is a situation where the data is a List of these object[] and I'm using the above StackPanel as part of a DataTemplate for a ListBox. So the idea, as Mark Heath suggests below, of using a property that dereferences the array doesn't seem to work as I'd want. Ideas?

29

Another alternative is to use MultiBinding with a converter:

<Window x:Class="WpfApplication1.MainWindow"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
        xmlns:local="clr-namespace:WpfApplication1"
        Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525">
    <StackPanel Orientation="Vertical">
        <StackPanel.Resources>
            <local:FoodIndexConverter x:Key="foodIndexConverter" />
        </StackPanel.Resources>
        <TextBlock Text="{Binding DessertIndex}" />
        <TextBlock Text="{Binding Food[2]}" />
        <TextBlock>
                <TextBlock.Text>
                    <MultiBinding Converter="{StaticResource foodIndexConverter}">
                        <Binding Path="DessertIndex" />
                        <Binding Path="Food"/>
                    </MultiBinding>
                </TextBlock.Text>
        </TextBlock>
    </StackPanel>
</Window>

Then in the code-behind, the converter is defined something like this:

namespace WpfApplication1
{
    public class FoodIndexConverter : IMultiValueConverter
    {
        public object Convert(object[] values, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
        {
            if (values == null || values.Length != 2)
                return null;

            int? idx = values[0] as int?;
            object[] food = values[1] as object[];

            if (!idx.HasValue || food == null)
                return null;

            return food[idx.Value];
        }

        public object[] ConvertBack(object value, Type[] targetTypes, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
        {
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }
    }
}
  • 1
    Thanks Colin - this works very well for my test app and suspect it'll work just as well in the real thing. It's been a good day - I learned something really cool from you. :) – itsmatt Nov 4 '10 at 20:42
  • 2
    You may be tempted to try something different using a ConverterParameter to avoid the multibinding. Unfortunately, that will lead nowhere, as the ConverterParameter cannot use a binding as it's not a DependencyProperty, and you must use MultiBinding – Anthony Wieser Oct 9 '13 at 9:56
13

if you are going to the trouble of having a DesertIndex property on your DataContext, why not a property that dereferences the Food array with DesertIndex:

public object SelectedFood
{
    get { return Food[DessertIndex]; }
}    

public int DessertIndex
{
    get { return 2; }
}

public object[] Food
{
    get
    {
        return new object[]{"liver", "spam", "cake", "garlic" };
    }
}

then you can bind directly to that:

<TextBlock Text="{Binding SelectedFood}" />

This is essentially the "MVVM" approach: make the datacontext object have properties that are just right for binding to.

  • Mark, thanks for your response. See my edit to the original question for more detail. Essentially I'm dealing with a ListBox and a List of these object[]'s so I don't know how to make the dereferencing as you suggest work in this context. The data isn't mine and I've got to deal with it as it is. Ideas? – itsmatt Nov 4 '10 at 20:16
  • yes I did wonder whether that might be the case. – Mark Heath Nov 4 '10 at 20:28

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.