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We get responses in the form of Json strings from an external C# system which need to be deserialized on our java platform. It's not straight forward because of the way C# dictionaries are serialized to Json strings. Here is how a sample map is serialized in java and C#.

Java: {"key1":"value1","key2":"value2"} C#: [{"Key":"key1","Value":"value1"},{"Key":"key2","Value":"value2"}]

We don't have any control over the external system, serializing format can't be changed on C# side. The response we get has many maps with different key value pair types. So, I'm trying to write a custom generic deserializer which builds required maps from Json response string. I'm using google's Gson API.

Here is what I tried:

private class DictionaryDeserializerGeneric<K,V> implements JsonDeserializer<Map<K, V>> {

    @Override
    public Map<K, V> deserialize(JsonElement json, Type type,
            JsonDeserializationContext context) throws JsonParseException {
        JsonArray jArray = (JsonArray)json;
        Map<K, V> map = new HashMap<K, V>();
        for(int i=0;i<jArray.size();i++) {
            JsonElement element = jArray.get(i);
            Gson gson = new Gson();
            PairGeneric<K,V> pair = gson.fromJson(element, new TypeToken<PairGeneric<K,V>>() {}.getType());
            K key = pair.getKey();
            V value = pair.getValue();
            map.put(key, value);
        }
        return map;
    }       
}

private class PairGeneric<K,V> {
    private K Key;
    private V Value;
    public K getKey() {
        return Key;
    }
    public V getValue() {
        return Value;
    }
}

In my parser code, I do the following

public static void main(String[] args) {
    GsonBuilder gsonBuilder = new GsonBuilder();
    gsonBuilder.registerTypeAdapter(new TypeToken<ClassA, ClassB>(){}.getType(), new DictionaryDeserializer<ClassA, ClassB>());
    gsonBuilder.registerTypeAdapter(new TypeToken<ClassC, ClassD>(){}.getType(), new DictionaryDeserializer<ClassC, ClassD>());
    Gson gson = gsonBuilder.create();
    String responseStr = getResponse();
    ResponseClass responseObj = gson.fromJson(responseStr, ResponseClass.class);
    doSomeOperation(responseObj);
}

public class ResponseClass {
    Map<ClassA, ClassB> map1;
    Map<ClassC, ClassC> map2;
    //Other fields...
    //Getter and setters...
}

The problem is that the types are getting lost somewhere and I'm seeing the below exception while using the responseObj object. Everything appears to be getting converted to LinkedHashMap class.

java.lang.ClassCastException: java.util.LinkedHashMap cannot be cast to ClassA

Same code works if I remove generics and create multiple deserializers, one for each Key,Value pair type. I read about java type erasure but couldn't figure out how it's causing the problem here.

Is there anyway to create one custom deserializer that works for all key value types?

1 Answer 1

0

I couldn't reproduce the exact exception you were talking about above, but the first thing I was thinking of was new TypeToken<PairGeneric<K,V>>() {}.getType() since there is no concrete type K and V information here -- they are just placeholders in this place. But even in this case the type token (effectively an anonymous class) generic parameterization is not erased and can be read at runtime. If you'd watch this type token state in your debugger, you'd see it having no concrete types (just pamameter type names K and V), however GSON seems to ignore them if it's aware about deserialization strategies for the types it could resolve (if your maps are parameterized since it also can be read at runtime).

Consider the following generic Pair class:

final class Pair<K, V> {

    @SerializedName("Key")
    private final K key = null;

    @SerializedName("Value")
    private final V value = null;

    private Pair() { }

    K getKey() { return key; }

    V getValue() { return value; }

}

GSON supports the SerializedName annotation that allows name overriding, thus letting to keep the field names in Java naming convention. Since this is an incoming DTO class, it's assumpted that no code would instantiate it itself, and no public constructor is provided. GSON can work without constructors and accessors as well, so this class can be purely read-only.

Generic dictionary JSON deserializer

The deserializer below can deserialize without being aware of concrete types. The principal difference is that it lets GSON choose a strategy for the Pair class itself. As far as I understand, GSON tries to resolve appropriate deserializer based on the DTO target type (your response object has parameterized maps map1 and map2). These concrete types are processed by GSON further.

final class GenericDictionaryJsonDeserializer<K, V>
        implements JsonDeserializer<Map<K, V>> {

    private static final JsonDeserializer<Map<Object, Object>> dictionaryJsonDeserializer = new GenericDictionaryJsonDeserializer<>();

    private GenericDictionaryJsonDeserializer() {
    }

    static <K, V> JsonDeserializer<Map<K, V>> getGenericDictionaryJsonDeserializer() {
        @SuppressWarnings({ "unchecked", "rawtypes" })
        final JsonDeserializer<Map<K, V>> castDictionaryJsonDeserializer = (JsonDeserializer) dictionaryJsonDeserializer;
        return castDictionaryJsonDeserializer;
    }

    @Override
    public Map<K, V> deserialize(final JsonElement json, final Type type, final JsonDeserializationContext context) {
        final JsonArray array = json.getAsJsonArray();
        final Map<K, V> result = new LinkedHashMap<>();
        for ( int i = 0; i < array.size(); i++ ) {
            final Pair<K, V> pair = context.deserialize(array.get(i), Pair.class);
            result.put(pair.getKey(), pair.getValue());
        }
        return result;
    }

}

All you need in your Gson instance is binding Map.class and the generic dictionary JSON deserializer. Consider migrating to another class, not Map (let's say interface IDictionary<K,V> extends Map<K,V>), in order to avoid clashing if you want some maps to be deserialized in "Java-style", or improving the deserializer class.

Targeted dictionary JSON deserializer

If cases when you're fine with targeted classes you're currently trying to avoid, you might want to use an alternative that's bound to a specific type.

final class TargetedDictionaryJsonDeserializer<K, V>
        implements JsonDeserializer<Map<K, V>> {

    private final Type pairType;

    private TargetedDictionaryJsonDeserializer(final Type pairType) {
        this.pairType = pairType;
    }

    static <K, V> JsonDeserializer<Map<K, V>> getTargetedDictionaryJsonDeserializer(final TypeToken<Pair<K, V>> typeToken) {
        return new TargetedDictionaryJsonDeserializer<>(typeToken.getType());
    }

    @Override
    public Map<K, V> deserialize(final JsonElement json, final Type type, final JsonDeserializationContext context) {
        final JsonArray array = json.getAsJsonArray();
        final Map<K, V> result = new LinkedHashMap<>();
        for ( int i = 0; i < array.size(); i++ ) {
            final Pair<K, V> pair = context.deserialize(array.get(i), pairType);
            result.put(pair.getKey(), pair.getValue());
        }
        return result;
    }

}

The differences between these types of adapters is that the latter accepts a concrete type token (that is fully declared by you at call sites (see the demo below)), and uses the type token type to delegate it to the context deserialization. It ensures strong type-safety where you need it.

Demonstration

private static final String JSON = "{" +
        "'map1':[{'Key':'key1','Value':'value1'},{'Key':'key2','Value':'value2'}]," +
        "'map2':[{'Key':'1','Value':'1.0'},{'Key':'2','Value':'2.0'}]" +
        "}";

private static final TypeToken<Map<String, String>> stringToStringTypeToken = new TypeToken<Map<String, String>>() {
};

private static final TypeToken<Map<Integer, Float>> integerToFloatTypeToken = new TypeToken<Map<Integer, Float>>() {
};

private static final TypeToken<Pair<String, String>> stringToStringPairTypeToken = new TypeToken<Pair<String, String>>() {
};

private static final TypeToken<Pair<Integer, Float>> integerToFloatPairTypeToken = new TypeToken<Pair<Integer, Float>>() {
};

public static void main(final String... args) {
    dump("by-targeted", getByTargetedTypeAdapter());
    dump("by-generic", getByGenericTypeAdapter());
    dump("by-mixed", getByMixTypeAdapter());
}

private static Response getByTargetedTypeAdapter() {
    return new GsonBuilder()
            .registerTypeAdapter(stringToStringTypeToken.getType(), getTargetedDictionaryJsonDeserializer(stringToStringPairTypeToken))
            .registerTypeAdapter(integerToFloatTypeToken.getType(), getTargetedDictionaryJsonDeserializer(integerToFloatPairTypeToken))
            .create()
            .fromJson(JSON, Response.class);
}

private static Response getByGenericTypeAdapter() {
    return new GsonBuilder()
            .registerTypeAdapter(Map.class, getGenericDictionaryJsonDeserializer())
            .create()
            .fromJson(JSON, Response.class);
}

private static Response getByMixTypeAdapter() {
    return new GsonBuilder()
            .registerTypeAdapter(Map.class, getGenericDictionaryJsonDeserializer())
            .registerTypeAdapter(stringToStringTypeToken.getType(), getTargetedDictionaryJsonDeserializer(stringToStringPairTypeToken))
            .create()
            .fromJson(JSON, Response.class);
}

private static final class Response {

    private final Map<String, String> map1 = null;
    private final Map<Integer, Float> map2 = null;

}

private static void dump(final String name, final Response response) {
    out.print(">> ");
    out.println(name);
    out.print("   ");
    out.println(response.map1);
    out.print("   ");
    out.println(response.map2);
}

The "targeted" mode passes concrete type adapters (see how stringToStringPairTypeToken and integerToFloatPairTypeToken are instantiated). Note that GsonBuilder allows overriding, so the "mixed" test case specifies the targeted strategy after the generic one (otherwise the generic one would be used always).

All the test cases parse the JSON and print the following output:

{key1=value1, key2=value2}
{1=1.0, 2=2.0}

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