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I am trying to use skimage.restoration.wiener, but I always end up with an image with a bunch of 1 (or -1), what am I doing wrong? The original image comes from Uni of Waterloo.

import numpy as np
from scipy.misc import imread
from skimage import color, data, restoration
from scipy.signal import convolve2d as conv2

def main():
  image = imread("/Users/gsamaras/Downloads/boat.tif")
  psf = np.ones((5, 5)) / 25
  image = conv2(image, psf, 'same')
  image += 0.1 * image.std() * np.random.standard_normal(image.shape)

  deconvolved = restoration.wiener(image, psf, 0.00001)
  print deconvolved
  print image

if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()

Output:

[[ 1. -1.  1. ...,  1. -1. -1.]
 [-1. -1.  1. ..., -1.  1.  1.]
 [ 1.  1.  1. ...,  1.  1.  1.]
 ..., 
 [ 1.  1.  1. ...,  1. -1.  1.]
 [ 1.  1.  1. ..., -1.  1. -1.]
 [ 1.  1.  1. ..., -1.  1.  1.]]
[[  62.73526298   77.84202199   94.1563234  ...,   85.12442365
    69.80579057   48.74330501]
 [  74.79638704  101.6248559   143.09978769 ...,  100.07197414
    94.34431216   59.72199141]
 [  96.41589893  132.53865314  161.8286996  ...,  137.17602535
   117.72691238   80.38638741]
 ..., 
 [  82.87641732  122.23168689  146.14129645 ...,  102.01214025
    75.03217549   59.78417916]
 [  74.25240964  100.64285679  127.38475015 ...,   88.04694654
    66.34568789   46.72457454]
 [  42.53382524   79.48377311   88.65000364 ...,   50.84624022
    36.45044106   33.22771889]]

And I tried several values. What am I missing?

  • 1
    Hard to debug without using a standard-image everyone can use. You should use clip=False as a start to see which kind of values are generated by the filter (which are automatically clipped to -1,1 as explained in the docs). Maybe the filter wants you to prepare the input in the 0,1 float-range (e.g. using img_as_float) but i'm not sure; i would try this too. Remark: in all ML-based formulations i know of, regulization-variables are are always positive. I would be scared of using something like -100000. If this is used to balance two components, it's always possible to use pos-vals. – sascha Dec 7 '16 at 14:12
  • I don't have any theoretical idea about that filter, but check the formula within the docs and think about your balance-variable beeing negative. What kind of effects are possible then. Maybe this is one cause of your problem. But i'm just guessing. – sascha Dec 7 '16 at 14:18
  • @sascha updated, clip=False must be the answer! You can check yourself, I have shared the link of publicly available image. That negative value was a desperate try. I feel that the value should be close to 10^-4, or something...1 seems to work best! :O Would you like to post an answer? ;) – gsamaras Dec 7 '16 at 15:11
  • I don't feel that's enough for an answer. It really looks like it boils down to the assumptions about the image-representation (float in 0-1 vs. float in 0-255; the latter seems not to be a good thing as the 0-255 ranges within scikit-learn are typically uint8-based i think). Clipping also is default which calls for some experiments about the input-types you use.I'm glad it's now working for you, but i think there is more to discover about those hidden assumptions(i think there is a special part in the docs about those types and ranges within the docs).Maybe img_as_float before is more concise – sascha Dec 7 '16 at 15:21
  • Well @sascha the image is in the link, the code is there too, you could try out yourself if you want! :) – gsamaras Dec 7 '16 at 15:22
1

My best so far solution is:

import numpy as np
#import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from scipy.misc import imfilter, imread
from skimage import color, data, restoration
from scipy.signal import convolve2d as conv2

def main():
  image = imread("/Users/gsamaras/Downloads/boat.tif")
  #plt.imshow(arr, cmap='gray')
  #plt.show()
  #blurred_arr = imfilter(arr, "blur")
  psf = np.ones((5, 5)) / 25
  image = conv2(image, psf, 'same')
  image += 0.1 * image.std() * np.random.standard_normal(image.shape)

  deconvolved = restoration.wiener(image, psf, 1, clip=False)
  #print deconvolved
  plt.imshow(deconvolved, cmap='gray')
  plt.show()
  #print image

if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()

Much smaller values in restoration.wiener() lead to images that appear like you have put a non-transparent overlay above it (like this). On the other hand as this value grows the image blurs more and more. A value near 1 seems to work best and deblur the image.

Worthnoting is the fact that the smaller this value (I mean the balance, the greater the image size is.


PS - I am open to new answers.

|improve this answer|||||
  • You can also try convolving with [[-1, -1, -1], [-1, 8, -1], [-1, -1, -1]] – Jeru Luke Jan 22 '17 at 5:15
  • Hmm @JeruLuke, as my PM says I am open to new answers, so you can post one, explaining your comment! (= Also I see that you didn't upvote my answer, regardless of the fact that you read it- does that mean I should delete it? – gsamaras Jan 22 '17 at 13:55
  • I usually play with OpenCV. And I have not not tried out your code snippet. By not voting, I am not at all saying you should delete it. Since the matrix mentioned above worked for me, I thought of mentioning it, that's all. :) – Jeru Luke Jan 22 '17 at 14:14

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