191

I have the language settings in the context as like below

class LanguageProvider extends Component {
  static childContextTypes = {
    langConfig: PropTypes.object,
  };

  getChildContext() {
    return { langConfig: 'en' };
  }

  render() {
    return this.props.children;
  }
}

export default LanguageProvider;

My application code will be something like below

<LanguageProvider>
  <App>
    <MyPage />
  </App>
</LanguageProvider>

My Page is having a component to switch the language

<MyPage>
  <LanguageSwitcher/>
</MyPage>

LanguageSwitcher in this MyPage need to update the context to change the language into 'jp' as below

class LanguageSwitcher extends Component {
  static contextTypes = {
    langConfig: PropTypes.object,
  };

  updateLanguage() {
    //Here I need to update the langConfig to 'jp' 
  }

  render() {
    return <button onClick={this.updateLanguage}>Change Language</button>;
  }
}

export default LanguageSwitcher;

How can I update the context from inside the LanguageSwitcher component ?

7
  • 1
    Have you read this? facebook.github.io/react/docs/context.html#updating-context Perhaps this is something more well suited for state not context
    – azium
    Dec 8, 2016 at 1:51
  • @azium Yes.. In that doc the context is updated from the component itself or there is blog link added in the doc which contains the context passed as a props to the context provider I need to update it from child component
    – mshameer
    Dec 8, 2016 at 3:36
  • 1
    update for others: the approach may have changed since @azium's comment as the document does provide a way to update the context from a child component: "It is often necessary to update the context from a component that is nested somewhere deeply in the component tree. In this case you can pass a function down through the context to allow consumers to update the context."
    – bill
    Jun 8, 2018 at 14:35
  • 2
    @LondonRob what kind of canonical answer are you looking for? IMO the content of the docs looks just fine to me. If you want to set the context in a child, just create a setter in the provider's component and pass that to a child consumer. Then call that setter in the child consumer and set it to whatever data is within the child. Still keeps with React's idea of lifting data up.
    – Andrew Li
    Jul 28, 2018 at 17:54
  • 3
    @azium just a heads up to others reading this comment all these years later. Updating the context from a child component is now supported and quite straightforward: hyp.is/FiP3mG6fEeqJiOfWzfKpgw/reactjs.org/docs/context.html Mar 25, 2020 at 13:48

4 Answers 4

489
+500

Using hooks

Hooks were introduced in 16.8.0 so the following code requires a minimum version of 16.8.0 (scroll down for the class components example). CodeSandbox Demo

1. Setting parent state for dynamic context

Firstly, in order to have a dynamic context which can be passed to the consumers, I'll use the parent's state. This ensures that I've a single source of truth going forth. For example, my parent App will look like this:

const App = () => {
  const [language, setLanguage] = useState("en");
  const value = { language, setLanguage };

  return (
    ...
  );
};

The language is stored in the state. We will pass both language and the setter function setLanguage via context later.

2. Creating a context

Next, I created a language context like this:

// set the defaults
const LanguageContext = React.createContext({
  language: "en",
  setLanguage: () => {}
});

Here I'm setting the defaults for language ('en') and a setLanguage function which will be sent by the context provider to the consumer(s). These are only defaults and I'll provide their values when using the provider component in the parent App.

Note: the LanguageContext remains same whether you use hooks or class based components.

3. Creating a context consumer

In order to have the language switcher set the language, it should have the access to the language setter function via context. It can look something like this:

const LanguageSwitcher = () => {
  const { language, setLanguage } = useContext(LanguageContext);
  return (
    <button onClick={() => setLanguage("jp")}>
      Switch Language (Current: {language})
    </button>
  );
};

Here I'm just setting the language to 'jp' but you may have your own logic to set languages for this.

4. Wrapping the consumer in a provider

Now I'll render my language switcher component in a LanguageContext.Provider and pass in the values which have to be sent via context to any level deeper. Here's how my parent App look like:

const App = () => {
  const [language, setLanguage] = useState("en");
  const value = { language, setLanguage };

  return (
    <LanguageContext.Provider value={value}>
      <h2>Current Language: {language}</h2>
      <p>Click button to change to jp</p>
      <div>
        {/* Can be nested */}
        <LanguageSwitcher />
      </div>
    </LanguageContext.Provider>
  );
};

Now, whenever the language switcher is clicked it updates the context dynamically.

CodeSandbox Demo

Using class components

The latest context API was introduced in React 16.3 which provides a great way of having a dynamic context. The following code requires a minimum version of 16.3.0. CodeSandbox Demo

1. Setting parent state for dynamic context

Firstly, in order to have a dynamic context which can be passed to the consumers, I'll use the parent's state. This ensures that I've a single source of truth going forth. For example, my parent App will look like this:

class App extends Component {
  setLanguage = language => {
    this.setState({ language });
  };

  state = {
    language: "en",
    setLanguage: this.setLanguage
  };

  ...
}

The language is stored in the state along with a language setter method, which you may keep outside the state tree.

2. Creating a context

Next, I created a language context like this:

// set the defaults
const LanguageContext = React.createContext({
  language: "en",
  setLanguage: () => {}
});

Here I'm setting the defaults for language ('en') and a setLanguage function which will be sent by the context provider to the consumer(s). These are only defaults and I'll provide their values when using the provider component in the parent App.

3. Creating a context consumer

In order to have the language switcher set the language, it should have the access to the language setter function via context. It can look something like this:

class LanguageSwitcher extends Component {
  render() {
    return (
      <LanguageContext.Consumer>
        {({ language, setLanguage }) => (
          <button onClick={() => setLanguage("jp")}>
            Switch Language (Current: {language})
          </button>
        )}
      </LanguageContext.Consumer>
    );
  }
}

Here I'm just setting the language to 'jp' but you may have your own logic to set languages for this.

4. Wrapping the consumer in a provider

Now I'll render my language switcher component in a LanguageContext.Provider and pass in the values which have to be sent via context to any level deeper. Here's how my parent App look like:

class App extends Component {
  setLanguage = language => {
    this.setState({ language });
  };

  state = {
    language: "en",
    setLanguage: this.setLanguage
  };

  render() {
    return (
      <LanguageContext.Provider value={this.state}>
        <h2>Current Language: {this.state.language}</h2>
        <p>Click button to change to jp</p>
        <div>
          {/* Can be nested */}
          <LanguageSwitcher />
        </div>
      </LanguageContext.Provider>
    );
  }
}

Now, whenever the language switcher is clicked it updates the context dynamically.

CodeSandbox Demo

12
  • 3
    what is the purpose of the default values you initialize the context with? Aren't those defaults always overridden by the Provider?
    – ecoe
    Jan 21, 2019 at 2:18
  • 2
    Why are contexts being limited to set/get one simple value.... That seems very inefficient. A better example would be to highlight a context that has default as an object and to update the object accordingly.
    – AlxVallejo
    Mar 28, 2020 at 0:20
  • 8
    Typescript complains in my case if setLanguage has no parameters. setLanguage: (language: string) => {} works for me.
    – alex351
    Jul 15, 2020 at 21:18
  • 2
    Thank you for this. This has been the clearest how-to that hasn't made me want to pull out my hair.
    – c0dezer019
    Nov 29, 2020 at 20:18
  • 2
    Fantastic answer. Thanks a lot for explaining it like this. Mar 31, 2021 at 14:14
88

Since it is recommended by React to use functional components and hooks so I will implement it with useContext and useState hooks. Here is how you can update the context from within a child component.

LanguageContextMangement.js

import React, { useState } from 'react'

export const LanguageContext = React.createContext({
  language: "en",
  setLanguage: () => {}
})

export const LanguageContextProvider = (props) => {

  const setLanguage = (language) => {
    setState({...state, language: language})
  }

  const initState = {
    language: "en",
    setLanguage: setLanguage
  } 

  const [state, setState] = useState(initState)

  return (
    <LanguageContext.Provider value={state}>
      {props.children}
    </LanguageContext.Provider>
  )
}

App.js

import React, { useContext } from 'react'
import { LanguageContextProvider, LanguageContext } from './LanguageContextManagement'

function App() {

  const state = useContext(LanguageContext)

  return (
    <LanguageContextProvider>
      <button onClick={() => state.setLanguage('pk')}>
        Current Language is: {state.language}
      </button>
    </LanguageContextProvider>
  )
}

export default App
11
  • 4
    I'm doing this and my set function inside my child component is always the one we initially declared when creating the context: () => {} Aug 29, 2019 at 13:40
  • 11
    To clarify, I think in your example state.setLanguage('pk') won't do anything, since const state = useContext(LanguageContext) is outside of the LanguageContextProvider. I solved my problem by moving the provider one level up and then using useContext on a child one level below. Aug 29, 2019 at 13:51
  • 2
    In case if you don't want to move your context provider one level up can also use context consumer like this: <LanguageContext.Consumer> {value => /* access your value here */} </LanguageContext.Consumer>. Aug 30, 2019 at 4:09
  • 4
    I really like the way you organize the LanguageContextMangement.js file. That's a clean way of doing things in my opinion and I'm going to start doing that now. Thank you! Oct 8, 2019 at 12:04
  • 3
    unfortunately, this is not working for me, when I try to consume the context in child components the 'setState' doesn't work.
    – Yuri Ramos
    Feb 21, 2020 at 18:50
8

I personally like this pattern:

File: context.jsx

import React from 'react';

// The Context 
const TemplateContext = React.createContext({});

// Template Provider
const TemplateProvider = ({children}) => {

    const [myValue, setMyValue] = React.useState(0);

    // Context values passed to consumer
    const value = {
        myValue,    // <------ Expose Value to Consumer
        setMyValue  // <------ Expose Setter to Consumer
    };

    return (
        <TemplateContext.Provider value={value}>
            {children}
        </TemplateContext.Provider>
    )
}

// Template Consumer
const TemplateConsumer = ({children}) => {
    return (
        <TemplateContext.Consumer>
            {(context) => {
                if (context === undefined) {
                    throw new Error('TemplateConsumer must be used within TemplateProvider');
                }
                return children(context)
            }}
        </TemplateContext.Consumer>
    )
}

// useTemplate Hook
const useTemplate = () => {
    const context = React.useContext(TemplateContext);
    if(context === undefined)
        throw new Error('useTemplate must be used within TemplateProvider');
    return context;
}

export {
    TemplateProvider,
    TemplateConsumer,
    useTemplate
}

Then you can create a functional component, if it is a child in the tree of the provider:

File: component.jsx

import React            from 'react';
import {useTemplate}    from 'context.jsx';
const MyComponent = () => {

    // Get the value and setter from the consumer hook
    const {myValue, setMyValue} = useTemplate();

    // Demonstrate incrementing the value
    React.useEffect(() => {

        // Increment, set in context
        const increment = () => setMyValue(prev => prev + 1); 

        // Increment every second
        let interval = setInterval(increment, 1000);

        // Cleanup, kill interval when unmounted
        return () => clearInterval(interval);

    },[]) // On mount, no dependencies

    // Render the value as it is pulled from the context
    return (
        <React.Fragment>
            Value of MyValue is: {myValue}
        </React.Fragment>
    )
}
2
  • This is great, simple and to the point !
    – nCoder
    Nov 24, 2021 at 0:57
  • i got error setMyValue undefined
    – famfamfam
    Apr 12 at 9:41
4

One quite simple solution is to set state on your context by including a setState method in your provider like so:

return ( 
            <Context.Provider value={{
              state: this.state,
              updateLanguage: (returnVal) => {
                this.setState({
                  language: returnVal
                })
              }
            }}> 
              {this.props.children} 
            </Context.Provider>
        )

And in your consumer, call updateLanguage like so:

// button that sets language config
<Context.Consumer>
{(context) => 
  <button onClick={context.updateLanguage({language})}> 
    Set to {language} // if you have a dynamic val for language
  </button>
<Context.Consumer>

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