43

I would like to have a certain code chunk highlighted in a different color (e.g. red) to indicate that it is bad practice. If I was using .Rnw, I could add the chunk option background = 'red' and get what I want, but this does not seem to work in .Rmd. My guess is that I need to make a custom css stylesheet (though what the selector would be, I don't know), and maybe also create a custom hook. I'd like it to be on a per-chunk basis, not an overall change for the entire document.

1
  • 2
    I have almost asked the same question recently, for different reasons. I want to format a chunk differently depending on whether it is "optional" (i.e. only prints and explores objects) vs. "mission-critical" (i.e. assigns to objects used downstream). I am happy to be the judge of that and explicitly set a chunk option. This would be handy for exposition.
    – jennybryan
    Dec 8, 2016 at 4:32

5 Answers 5

40
+500

We can use the class.source option in the code chunk header to provide custom CSS to R Markdown. This is explained in the following post:

Add a CSS class to single code chunks in RMarkdown

Putting together an example, I might set a class called "badCode" then have a bit of CSS to change the background as you might like. Here's my .Rmd:

---
output: html_document
---

```{css}
.badCode {
background-color: red;
}
```

```{r mtcars}
summary(mtcars)
```

```{r cars, class.source="badCode"}
summary(cars)
```
6
  • Very nice. Could you explain what the second call to paste0() is doing? I can't figure out what {.r ...} (with surrounding triple backticks) does and how it gets processed. Dec 8, 2016 at 15:32
  • 2
    You have exposed the difference between getting one thing to work a few times and actually understanding what's going on :) I'll do my best with the latter. I think the {.r ...} notation is a signal to pandoc to process these as html classes. The second call to paste0() is simply inserting the contents of options$class as the ... in {.r ...}. FWIW, my debugging method was to look at the .md file (in RStudio, using the "keep md file" option).
    – Ian Lyttle
    Dec 8, 2016 at 20:33
  • 1
    Ahah -- that helps a lot. Looks like it's a combination of the Pandoc markdown extensions backtick_code_blocks and fenced_code_attributes which can be used to insert all sorts of attributes in a wrapping <pre></pre> tag. See here for documentation. Thanks also for the debugging tip. I had tried setting keep_md: true in my YAML header, which for some reason didn't work here. Next time I have trouble with that, I will try from RStudio. Thanks for your response! Dec 8, 2016 at 20:58
  • Nice, but it seems to mess up text wrapping for code chunks. Feb 27, 2018 at 16:07
  • 1
    I found a post elsewhere with your name on it: github.com/yihui/knitr-examples/blob/master/116-html-class.Rmd . I considered posting it as a new answer but I updated yours instead as it felt like I was stealing :) Oct 6, 2018 at 8:22
35

Remember markdown supports HTML outside of code blocks.

I would surround the code chunks with a div with a custom class that styled them how I wanted. This example styles the code in blue, the output in light blue

<style>
div.blue pre { background-color:lightblue; }
div.blue pre.r { background-color:blue; }
</style>

<div class = "blue">
```{r bluecars}
summary(cars)
```
</div>

```{r normal}
summary(cars)
```

enter image description here

2
  • This is smart. For some reason I remember having problems wrapping around code chunks. But now that I think about it, that was probably when I tried wrapping <div>/<span>/<section> around slides using slidify.
    – mkearney
    Dec 8, 2016 at 19:15
  • This also works for different language code chunks; I was able to use this for pre.js too.
    – Nancy
    Apr 2, 2017 at 20:25
8

This solution is a bit hack-y, but it works. The gist of it is to make two code chunks, swapping the {r} designator with a unique class name. Then add css code to style each chunk.

---
output: html_document
---

<style>
pre.bluecars {
    background-color: #aabbff !important;
}
pre.redcars {
    background-color: #ffbbbb !important;
}
</style>

## chunk-specific bg colors

```{r setup, include=FALSE}
knitr::opts_chunk$set(echo = TRUE)
```

- blue

```{bluecars}
summary(cars)
```

```{r, echo=FALSE}
summary(cars)
```

- normal

```{r}
summary(cars)
```

- red

```{redcars}
summary(cars)
```

```{r, echo=FALSE}
summary(cars)
```

screenshot

6

I found the following way to color (code) chunks in Rmarkdown documents that I knit to PDF:

Use a pandoc highlighting scheme as a basis

pandoc --print-highlight-style pygments > my.theme

Then edit my.theme by using a regex to set all

"text-color": null

Then, you can change this property to any color you like (this one here is lightgrey)

"background-color": "#f8f8f8"

In the YAML of your .Rmd document under "pdf_document", put the following

pandoc_args: --highlight-style=my.theme

For my use case this is all I need.

1
  • To run the first command, you'd need a unix terminal and must have pandoc installed in your machine. This helped in my case, I can change the text-color to whatever I want + the nice grey background for PDF files. Mar 18, 2020 at 15:17
1

you can also use following examples:

```{css, echo = F}
h1 { color: rgb(255, 125, 0); }
h2 { color: brown; }
div.yellow pre { background-color: lightyellow; }
div.yellow pre.r { background-color: lightblue; }
.my_pink1 { background-color: pink; }
.my_pink2 { background-color: rgb(255, 113, 181); color: white; border: 3px solid blue; }
.my_span  { background-color: orange; font-family: courier}
```

# Title 1
## Title 2

<div class = "yellow">

```{r yellow_cars1}
summary(cars)
```

</div>

```{r yellow_cars2, class.source = "my_pink1", class.output = "my_pink2"}
summary(cars)
```

Test: <span class = "my_span">change properties</span> \
Roses are $\color{red}{\text{beautiful red}}$,
violets are $\color{blue}{\text{lovely blue}}$.

read more e.g. at
Changing chunk background color in RMarkdown
https://bookdown.org/yihui/rmarkdown-cookbook/chunk-styling.html
How to change the font color?

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