8

I'm working with Swift in Ubuntu, and I am getting an error that arc4random is an unresolved identifier. More information on this known bug here. Basically, the function only exists in BSD distros. I've tried module mapping header files, apt-getting packages, and I get more and more errors, which is not worth pursuing since this one function is not used very often.

Are there any functions to get pseudo random numbers with an upper-bound parameter that is compatible with Swift in Linux?

  • 2
    What does "do the same thing" mean? As you noticed, arc4random is not available on Ubuntu (unless you install the libbsd package). There are other functions for generating (pseudo) random numbers, but they are not "the same" as arc4random. – Martin R Dec 8 '16 at 9:35
  • @MartinR edited my question. I wanted to go for a function that did something like arc4random_uniform(max), but I guess the modulo bias is not that important for my use – Tyress Dec 9 '16 at 1:43
  • Possible duplicate of Generating random numbers with Swift – jww Nov 5 '17 at 15:35
  • @jww the arc4random Linux bug as I linked to in my question is still not resolved at the moment. The other question doesn't seem to mention anything that will workaround this issue. – Tyress Nov 7 '17 at 6:12
5

If generating a random number within a function, using srandom(UInt32(time(nil))) inside the function can produce the same random number every time.

Instead, prepare the random seed at the top of your main.swift once, and then random should behave as expected throughout.

Example:

//
//  main.swift
//  Top of your code
//

import Foundation

#if os(Linux)
    srandom(UInt32(time(nil)))
#endif


func getRandomNum(_ min: Int, _ max: Int) -> Int {
    #if os(Linux)
        return Int(random() % max) + min
    #else
        return Int(arc4random_uniform(UInt32(max)) + UInt32(min))
    #endif
}

// Print random numbers between 1 and 10
print(getRandomNum(1, 10))
print(getRandomNum(1, 10))
print(getRandomNum(1, 10))
print(getRandomNum(1, 10))
print(getRandomNum(1, 10))

Swift on Linux (Ubuntu in my case) will produce the same number every time if you put the srandom call inside my getRandomNum function.

Note of Caution:

srandom and random do not create a "truly" random number, and can be a security concern when making mission-critical applications that would be a target of a hack. The only real solution in that case is to execute Linux's /dev/random directly via Process(), and using its result. But this is outside the scope of the question.

  • The code above has a bias, and the distribution is not uniform. – jww Nov 5 '17 at 15:11
  • What? The question was about Swift code running on Ubuntu. “The distribution is not uniform”? It has a bias? Please explain in detail. – gavanon Nov 5 '17 at 15:12
  • So then you would also have a problem with the accepted answer and have voted it down. Yet you didn’t. My point was to emphasize that initialize the seed in a function is problematic. – gavanon Nov 5 '17 at 15:18
  • 1
    Own up to your mistake. You provided a solution which suggested using arc4random, which is impossible on Linux. In fact, it’s currently impossible to generate a truly random number in Swift on Linux, and thus, it’s wrong to downvote every answer because it doesn’t do the impossible. – gavanon Nov 5 '17 at 18:43
4

I went with something like this for 4-digit random numbers:

#if os(Linux)
 srandom(UInt32(time(nil)))
 randomString = String(format: "%04d", UInt32(random() % 10000))
#else
 randomString = String(format: "%04d", Int(arc4random_uniform(10000)))
#endif

Edit: Note that the call to srandom(UInt32(time(nil))) should be outside a function/loop, otherwise it will produce the same value over and over again

  • 1
    Note that by using 9999 the maximum random number returned by arc4random_uniform would be 9998. You should use arc4random_uniform(10000) – Leo Dabus Nov 5 '17 at 14:52
  • The code above has a bias, and the distribution is not uniform. – jww Nov 5 '17 at 15:17
  • @jww As I wrote in my comment 1 year ago to MartinR, the modulo bias isn't important for my use. However if you can provide a better answer that would probably be helpful for other people, feel free to write one! – Tyress Nov 7 '17 at 6:21
3

Swift 4.2

let random = Int.random(in: 0...100)

https://developer.apple.com/documentation/swift/int/2995648-random

PS. It works in Linux.

2

You could try something like this?

    #if os(Linux)
       random()
    #else
        arc4random_uniform()
    #endif
  • Thanks for your answer, but arc4random_uniform actually needs a max parameter, and so do I. I posted my solution. – Tyress Dec 9 '16 at 6:46

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