16

I'm trying to do a complexe non-equi join between two tables. I got inspired by a presentation in the last useR2016 (https://channel9.msdn.com/events/useR-international-R-User-conference/useR2016/Efficient-in-memory-non-equi-joins-using-datatable) which made me believe it would be a suitable task for data.table. My table 1 looks like:

library(data.table)
sp <- c("SAB","SAB","SAB","SAB","EPN","EPN","BOP","BOP","BOP","BOP","BOP","PET","PET","PET")
dbh <- c(10,12,16,22,12,16,10,12,14,20,26,12,16,18)
dt1 <- data.table(sp,dbh)
dt1
     sp dbh
 1: SAB  10
 2: SAB  12
 3: SAB  16
 4: SAB  22
 5: EPN  12
 6: EPN  16
 7: BOP  10
 8: BOP  12
 9: BOP  14
10: BOP  20
11: BOP  26
12: PET  12
13: PET  16
14: PET  18

It's a list of trees with their dbh. My second table (below) gives a generic table that gives for each tree species a range of dbh to classify the size class or the tree:

gr_sp <- c("RES","RES","RES","RES","RES","RES", "DEC", "DEC", "DEC", "DEC", "DEC", "DEC")
sp <- c("SAB","SAB", "SAB", "EPN", "EPN", "EPN", "BOP", "BOP", "BOP", "PET", "PET", "PET")
dbh_min <- c(10, 16, 22, 10, 14, 20, 10, 18, 24, 10, 20, 26)
dbh_max <- c(14, 20, 30, 12, 18, 30, 16, 22, 30, 18, 24, 30)
dhb_clas <- c("s", "m", "l", "s", "m", "l", "s", "m", "l", "s", "m", "l")

dt2 <- data.table(gr_sp, sp, dbh_min, dbh_max, dhb_clas)
dt2
    gr_sp  sp dbh_min dbh_max dhb_clas
 1:   RES SAB      10      14        s
 2:   RES SAB      16      20        m
 3:   RES SAB      22      30        l
 4:   RES EPN      10      12        s
 5:   RES EPN      14      18        m
 6:   RES EPN      20      30        l
 7:   DEC BOP      10      16        s
 8:   DEC BOP      18      22        m
 9:   DEC BOP      24      30        l
10:   DEC PET      10      18        s
11:   DEC PET      20      24        m
12:   DEC PET      26      30        l

I want my final table to be the join of the two tables by species ("sp" field) and within the range of dhb stated by "DBH_MIN" and "DBH_MAX". That would make my table looks like:

data.table(dt1, gr_sp = c("RES","RES","RES","RES","RES","RES","DEC","DEC","DEC","DEC","DEC","DEC","DEC","DEC"), dhb_clas = c("s","s","m","l","s","m","s","s","s","m","l","s","s","s"))
     sp dbh gr_sp dhb_clas
 1: SAB  10   RES        s
 2: SAB  12   RES        s
 3: SAB  16   RES        m
 4: SAB  22   RES        l
 5: EPN  12   RES        s
 6: EPN  16   RES        m
 7: BOP  10   DEC        s
 8: BOP  12   DEC        s
 9: BOP  14   DEC        s
10: BOP  20   DEC        m
11: BOP  26   DEC        l
12: PET  12   DEC        s
13: PET  16   DEC        s
14: PET  18   DEC        s

I've tried something like:

dt1[dt2, on=.(sp=sp, dbh>=dbh_min, dbh<=dbh_max)]

which gives too many rows...

Thanks for your help

3 Answers 3

18

So I was very close. I had 2 problems, first a bad installation of the data.table package (Data table error could not find function ".") caused an obscure error.

After having fixed that, I got closer an found that :

dt1[dt2, on=.(sp=sp, dbh>=dbh_min, dbh<=dbh_max), nomatch=0]

gave me what I wanted with a bad dbh column. Inverting the command with:

dt2[dt1, on=.(sp=sp, dbh_min<=dbh, dbh_max>=dbh)]

fixed the problem with only one useless extra column.

5
  • 6
    Using the first way, you can enumerate the columns you want, using x.* and i.* prefixes: dt1[dt2, on=.(sp, dbh >= dbh_min, dbh <= dbh_max), .(sp, dbh = x.dbh, gr_sp, dhb_clas)]
    – Frank
    Commented Dec 8, 2016 at 16:52
  • 1
    Please follow @Frank advice on using x. prefix. It is especially useful for non-equi join where, due to consistency to base R, you get renamed columns used in join. This is discussed in #1615.
    – jangorecki
    Commented Dec 8, 2016 at 17:14
  • 2
    Thanks @Frank, you're comment got me even closer to perfection! Adding nomatch=0 to your call made it perfect!
    – Bastien
    Commented Dec 8, 2016 at 17:16
  • 3
    Here's a non-equi join way of doing the same. dt1[dt2, on="sp", allow.cartesian=T][dbh>=dbh_min & dbh<=dbh_max, -c("dbh_min","dbh_max")] The non-equi join functionality is awesome...but depending on the type of your data, the other method may be faster. Lately I have had a few situations with 10s of millions of rows where I would write it both ways and find that the non-equi join approach is 2x slower. It probably was slightly less in terms of memory used.
    – ironv
    Commented Dec 9, 2016 at 16:20
  • 1
    this is a good thread on non equi joins although a little old. @ironv how do you avoid using non equi join if you donot have a single column that is common between the two DTs. Here in this example, there is a common column sp. And then it makes sense. Commented Mar 19, 2018 at 1:58
2

For "between" joins like this one, one could also use data.table::foverlaps, which joins two data.table's on ranges that overlap, instead of using non-equi joins.

Taking the same example, the following code would produce the desired outcome.

# foverlap tests the overlap of two ranges.  Create a second column,
# dbh2, as the end point of the range.
dt1[, dbh2 := dbh]

# foverlap requires the second argument to be keyed
setkey(dt1, sp, dbh, dbh2)

# find rows where dbh falls between dbh_min and dbh_max, and drop unnecessary
# columns afterwards
foverlaps(dt2, dt1, by.x = c("sp", "dbh_min", "dbh_max"), by.y = key(dt1),
          nomatch = 0)[
  ,
  -c("dbh2", "dbh_min", "dbh_max")
]

#  sp dbh gr_sp dhb_clas
#  1: SAB  10   RES        s
#  2: SAB  12   RES        s
#  3: SAB  16   RES        m
#  4: SAB  22   RES        l
#  5: EPN  12   RES        s
#  6: EPN  16   RES        m
#  7: BOP  10   DEC        s
#  8: BOP  12   DEC        s
#  9: BOP  14   DEC        s
# 10: BOP  20   DEC        m
# 11: BOP  26   DEC        l
# 12: PET  12   DEC        s
# 13: PET  16   DEC        s
# 14: PET  18   DEC        s
2

With join_by, available in dplyr 1.1.0. You can use the helper between as well.

library(dplyr)
left_join(dt1, dt2, by = join_by(sp, dbh >= dbh_min, dbh <= dbh_max))

#or, with between():
left_join(dt1, dt2, by = join_by(sp, between(dbh, dbh_min, dbh_max)))

output

   sp dbh gr_sp dbh_min dbh_max dhb_clas
1  SAB  10   RES      10      14        s
2  SAB  12   RES      10      14        s
3  SAB  16   RES      16      20        m
4  SAB  22   RES      22      30        l
5  EPN  12   RES      10      12        s
6  EPN  16   RES      14      18        m
7  BOP  10   DEC      10      16        s
8  BOP  12   DEC      10      16        s
9  BOP  14   DEC      10      16        s
10 BOP  20   DEC      18      22        m
11 BOP  26   DEC      24      30        l
12 PET  12   DEC      10      18        s
13 PET  16   DEC      10      18        s
14 PET  18   DEC      10      18        s

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