4

I know there are numerous questions regarding this error on here but I've searched through many and none seem to explain it in my case! I've created a table using the following code:

CREATE TABLE Venue (
     venueID VARCHAR(20), 
     venueEmail VARCHAR(30) NOT NULL, 
     address VARCHAR(100), 
     phoneNo VARCHAR(20), 
     managerNo VARCHAR(20), 
     capacity INT(4), 
     PRIMARY KEY (venueEmail)
)ENGINE=InnoDB;

And am trying to create a table with a foreign key that refers to the first table using this code:

CREATE TABLE Concert (
     referenceNo VARCHAR(6), 
     venueEmail VARCHAR(30), 
     eventDate VARCHAR(10),
     startTime VARCHAR(5),
     ticketsSold INT(4),
     PRIMARY KEY (referenceNo), 
     FOREIGN KEY (venueEmail) REFERENCES Venue ON UPDATE CASCADE ON DELETE CASCADE
)ENGINE=InnoDB;

But it's giving me the 1215 error message!

  • 1
    Rather than saying "The 1215 error message", you should include the message in your question. Also, don't you have to specify a column, like REFERENCES Venue(venueEmail)? – Tyler Roper Dec 8 '16 at 17:29
  • Don't you have to reference the column venueEmail on the Venue table? – WEI_DBA Dec 8 '16 at 17:31
4

Syntax wise this isn't correct.

The issue's resolved here:

CREATE TABLE Venue (
     venueID VARCHAR(20), 
     venueEmail VARCHAR(30) NOT NULL, 
     address VARCHAR(100), 
     phoneNo VARCHAR(20), 
     managerNo VARCHAR(20), 
     capacity INT(4), 
     PRIMARY KEY (venueEmail)
)ENGINE=InnoDB;

CREATE TABLE Concert (
     referenceNo VARCaHAR(6), 
     venueEmail VARCHAR(30), 
     eventDate VARCHAR(10),
     startTime VARCHAR(5),
     ticketsSold INT(4),
     PRIMARY KEY (referenceNo), 
     FOREIGN KEY (venueEmail) REFERENCES Venue(`venueEmail`) ON UPDATE CASCADE ON DELETE CASCADE
)ENGINE=InnoDB;

Note:

The column being referenced should be stated like table_name(column_name).

You missed the column_name part.


REFERENCE


More:

@Bill Karwin added the following useful info in the comment section:

FWIW this is a MySQL idiosyncrasy. In standard SQL, if you omit the referenced column name, it defaults to the same name as the foreign key column. But InnoDB doesn't support this shortcut syntax—you must specify the column in both cases.

  • 1
    +1 FWIW this is a MySQL idiosyncrasy. In standard SQL, if you omit the referenced column name, it defaults to the same name as the foreign key column. But InnoDB doesn't support this shortcut syntax—you must specify the column in both cases. – Bill Karwin Dec 8 '16 at 17:48
  • Great! This is a nice addition. I didn't know about this standard SQL rule. Thanks @BillKarwin – 1000111 Dec 8 '16 at 17:49
  • @1000111 didn't need the single quotation marks in the brackets but this has fixed it. Thanks!! – pxdr0 Dec 8 '16 at 17:58
  • 1
    @pxdr0 Those aren't single quotations, they're backticks, and are generally used to encapsulate field names in MySQL. They're not necessary in most cases, but in the event you're using a reserved keyword as a column name, you'll need to use them. Thus, it's a decent habit to start. – Tyler Roper Dec 8 '16 at 18:38
  • @Santi ah ok. thanks :) – pxdr0 Dec 9 '16 at 16:43

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