I am looking to create a stateless component who's input can be validated by the parent element.

In my example below, I am running into a problem where the input ref is never being assigned to the parent's private _emailAddress property.

When handleSubmit is called, this._emailAddress is undefined. Is there something I'm missing, or is there a better way to do this?

interface FormTestState {
    errors: string;
}

class FormTest extends React.Component<void, FormTestState> {
    componentWillMount() {
        this.setState({ errors: '' });
    }

    render(): JSX.Element {
        return (
            <main role='main' className='about_us'>             
                <form onSubmit={this._handleSubmit.bind(this)}>
                    <TextInput 
                        label='email'
                        inputName='txtInput'
                        ariaLabel='email'
                        validation={this.state.errors}
                        ref={r => this._emailAddress = r}
                    />

                    <button type='submit'>submit</button>
                </form>
            </main>
        );
    }

    private _emailAddress: HTMLInputElement;

    private _handleSubmit(event: Event): void {
        event.preventDefault();
        // this._emailAddress is undefined
        if (!Validators.isEmail(this._emailAddress.value)) {
            this.setState({ errors: 'Please enter an email address.' });
        } else {
            this.setState({ errors: 'All Good.' });
        }
    }
}

const TextInput = ({ label, inputName, ariaLabel, validation, ref }: { label: string; inputName: string; ariaLabel: string; validation?: string; ref: (ref: HTMLInputElement) => void }) => (
    <div>
        <label htmlFor='txt_register_first_name'>
            { label }
        </label>

        <input type='text' id={inputName} name={inputName} className='input ' aria-label={ariaLabel} ref={ref} />

        <div className='input_validation'>
            <span>{validation}</span>
        </div>
    </div>
);
up vote 21 down vote accepted

You can't access React like methods (like componentDidMount, componentWillReceiveProps, etc) on stateless components, including refs. Checkout this discussion on GH for the full convo.

The idea of stateless is that there isn't an instance created for it (state). As such, you can't attach a ref, since there's no state to attach the ref to.

Your best bet would be to pass in a callback for when the component changes and then assign that text to the parent's state.

Or, you can forego the stateless component altogether and use an normal class component.

From the docs...

You may not use the ref attribute on functional components because they don't have instances. You can, however, use the ref attribute inside the render function of a functional component.

function CustomTextInput(props) {
  // textInput must be declared here so the ref callback can refer to it
  let textInput = null;

  function handleClick() {
    textInput.focus();
  }

  return (
    <div>
      <input
        type="text"
        ref={(input) => { textInput = input; }} />
      <input
        type="button"
        value="Focus the text input"
        onClick={handleClick}
      />
    </div>
  );  
}
  • I get error textInput.focus is not a function – jasan Jun 15 '17 at 22:30
  • @jasan are you wrapping your input in another component? if so, you'll need to expose the focus method on that class. If you're still having an issue inspect the value of textInput in when you're calling focus. – Brad Bumbalough Jun 16 '17 at 9:03
  • yes, I am using Field from redux-form. I found the solution. cheers – jasan Jun 16 '17 at 9:11
  • Well you can still access the ref by passing the value from the ref to the parent, through a prop function, at the stateless component do ref={input => innerRef(input)} , on the parent use the prop you passed like you use ref normally; innerRef={input => this.customInputRef = input} – Eyo Okon Eyo Apr 20 at 11:55

I needed something similar to this. To add to Brad's answer, you can pass a validation handler as a prop and then use the inner function to invoke the validation handler.

function CustomTextInput({ validationHandler }) {
  // textInput must be declared here so the ref callback can refer to it
  let textInput = null;

  function handleClick() {
    validationHandler(textInput.value);
  }

  return (
    <div>
      <input
        type="text"
        ref={(input) => { textInput = input; }} />
      <input
        type="button"
        value="Validate the text input from a parent function"
        onClick={handleClick}
      />
    </div>
  );  
}

The value of your TextInput is nothing more than a state of your component. So instead of fetching the current value with a reference (bad idea in general, as far as I know) you could fetch the current state.

In a reduced version (without typing):

class Form extends React.Component {
  constructor() {
    this.state = { _emailAddress: '' };

    this.updateEmailAddress = this.updateEmailAddress.bind(this);
    this.handleSubmit = this.handleSubmit.bind(this);
  }

  updateEmailAddress(e) {
    this.setState({ _emailAddress: e.target.value });
  }

  handleSubmit() {
    console.log(this.state._emailAddress);
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <form onSubmit={this.handleSubmit}>
        <input
          value={this.state._emailAddress}
          onChange={this.updateEmailAddress}
        />
      </form>
    );
  }
}
  • 1
    Assigning to state gets a little rough when forms get lengthy, which is why I was trying to solve this with the ref. I totally buy that what I'm trying to do is not possible here, but would you mind explaining, or referencing an article that explains why using ref is a bad idea in general? – drewwyatt Dec 8 '16 at 21:47
  • Maybe you could compose your component in multiple levels? Try this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/29503213/… – Ole Bläsing Dec 8 '16 at 21:50
  • 1
    There's a word of caution here: facebook.github.io/react/docs/… – Brad Bumbalough Dec 8 '16 at 22:05
  • @BradBumbalough thank you! – drewwyatt Dec 11 '16 at 19:09

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