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My problem is that JPA/Hibernate returns true for a call of entityManager.getTransaction().isActive() even when I did not explicitly start a transaction (see code below).

The problem here is that I want to read something from the database and a SerializationException is ok in this scenario, because this just indicates that the persisted object does not fit to the actual code any more and needs to be recalculated. Instead of just returning null the code below throws the following exception:

Transaction rollback failed.
org.hibernate.TransactionException: Unable to rollback against JDBC Connection

This shows me, there must have been a transaction somewhere which I did not start in my code. The finally block in the code above is

final EntityManager entityManager = Persistence.createEntityManagerFactory("test").createEntityManager();

try {
    final TypedQuery<Test> query = entityManager.createQuery("SELECT t FROM test t", Test.class);

    return query.getResultList();

} catch (final PersistenceException e) {
    if (e.getCause() instanceof SerializationException) {
        LOG.debug("Implementation changed meanwhile. That's ok - we return null.");
        return null;
    }
    throw e;

} finally {
    EntityManagerCloser.closeEntityManager(entityManager);
}

And the EntityManagerCloser looks like this:

public final class EntityManagerCloser {
    private static final Logger LOG = LoggerFactory.getLogger(EntityManagerCloser.class);

    public static void closeEntityManager(EntityManager entityManager) {
        if (entityManager.getTransaction().isActive()) {
            try {
                entityManager.getTransaction().rollback();
            } catch (PersistenceException | IllegalStateException e) {
                LOG.error("Transaction rollback failed.", e);
            }
        }
        if (entityManager.isOpen()) {
            try {
                entityManager.close();
            } catch (IllegalStateException e) {
                LOG.error("Closing entity manager failed.", e);
            }
        }    
    }
}

Hibernate docs says "Always use clear transaction boundaries, even for read-only operations". So do I really need to insert a

entityManager.getTransaction().begin();
....
<do read here>
....
entityManager.getTransaction().commit();

around every read operation I perform on the database?

I could implement another closeEntityManager method for read-only operations without the rollback transaction block but I want to understand why there IS a transaction at all. Thanks for any help!

2 Answers 2

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The problem is that when you call entityManager.getTransaction(); a new transaction object will be created. So it is better to save the transaction reference to a variable as shown below.

Transaction txn = entityManager.getTransaction();

if (txn.isActive()) {
   try {
     txn.rollback();
     } catch (PersistenceException | IllegalStateException e) {
        LOG.error("Transaction rollback failed.", e);
      }
}
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  • Thanks for your hint that calling entityManager.getTransaction() already starts a transaction even if your answer was no direct solution to my question because I do not want a transaction object at all. Commented Dec 9, 2016 at 12:56
  • The problem is that when you call entityManager.getTransaction(); a new transaction object will be created. So it is better to save the transaction reference to a variable as shown below. This is a bad advice. See codota.com/code/java/methods/org.hibernate.Transaction/isActive : session.getTransaction().begin(); ... session.getTransaction().commit();
    – user5182503
    Commented Jun 12, 2021 at 15:52
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Thanks to Jobin I quickly found the solution to my problem:

I think I need to call entityManager.isJoinedToTransaction() in my closeEntityManager method before calling entityManager.getTransaction().isActive().

This will prevent the EntityManagerCloser to start its own transaction which I can not rollback later because I did not explicitly call transaction.begin() on it.

2

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