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How does shovel operator between two integers result in the returned value?

irb(main):001:0> 5 << 7
=> 640
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  • 1
    This is documented and easily found. Look at the ruby-doc.org main page, click the Core API link, then use your browser to search for <<. You can figure it out easily from there. Commented Dec 9, 2016 at 17:32
  • It would be nice to tell us what specific part of the documentation you didn't understand, so that the Ruby developers can improve the documentation. Commented Dec 10, 2016 at 10:03
  • I first tried searching for '<<' in the search box at the top of the ruby-doc page but came up empty. Then I looked through the Integer and Numeric class pages for the '<<' method and came up empty. At the time, I never thought to do a browser search for '<<' on the core page to search through every single Ruby method in the core library. I learned my lesson. Commented Dec 12, 2016 at 17:19

2 Answers 2

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This is a left shift operator, where you can see it more easily demonstrated with binary notation:

 5 << 7
 # => 640
 5.to_s(2)
 # => "101"
 (5 << 7).to_s(2)
 # => "1010000000"

Notice the additional 7 0 bits.

5

It's a bitwise shift:

640 = 5 * (2^7)
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  • 1
    Perhaps it would be better to write this correctly in code as 5 * 2**7 #=> 640. Commented Dec 9, 2016 at 18:01

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