2

I have a RNA sequence, which looks likes this. Each character represents a nucleotide ( programmers can ignore this, you can treat them as elements) :

         (((((((..((((.....(..)))).((((.........)))).....(((((..)....))))))))))))....

I will use this nomenclature for the purpose of the question:

          ( = lhb
          ) = rhb 
          . = dot

so essentially elements having lhb are connected to elements having rhb and all the dots are free regions.The way they are connected is complicated. It's hard to put in words so for convenience I will put numbers below some of the elements, which are connected :

   (((((((..((((.....(..)))).((((.........)))).....(((((..)....))))))))))))....
   1                 2  2       3         3           45  5    4          1   

I think this will give you an idea about how they are connected. I am interested in finding out the locations of elements which are connected and regions which are free.

(e.g. element 1 is connected to element 72 and elements 8 to 9 are free).

I chose C to code but I am no where close to logic.

Also, It is becoming more difficult to program in C. I feel one can do this easily in python using regular expressions or may be perl but I don't have much experience with those languages. So, if anyone can provide an easier method that will be a huge help. Ideas to improve C code are also welcome. Here is my C code :-

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {

char dot[500];
int i = 0, j = 0;
int count = 0, count1 = 0, count2 = 0;
int lhb[100];
int rhb[100];
int dots[100];
int pair_1[100];
int pair_2[100];
int pair_3[100];
FILE * fp;

fp = fopen("structure.txt", "r");

while (fscanf(fp, "%c", & dot[i]) != EOF) {

  i++;
}

fclose(fp);

for (i = 0; dot[i] != '\0'; i++) {

  if (dot[i] == '(') {
    lhb[count] = dot[i];
    pair_1[count] = i;
    count++;
    } 
  else if (dot[i] == '.') {
    rhb[count1] = dot[i];
    pair_2[count1] = i;
    count1++;
    }
  else {
    dots[count2] = dot[i];
    pair_3[count2] = i;
    count2++;
    }
}


printf("Base-pair details :\n");

for (j = 0; j < count; j++)

  printf("%d--%d\n", pair_1[j] + 1, pair_3[count - j - 1] + 1);

printf("Loop details :\n");

// for(j=0;j<=count;j++)

// printf("--%d-",pair_2[j]+1);

return 0;

}


  • 1
    It's a classical "parentheses balancing" problem if we get rid of all of the RNA noise around... – Eugene Sh. Dec 9 '16 at 18:17
  • 2
    "I feel one can do this easily in python using regular expressions or may be perl but I don't have much experience with those languages." Unless you plan to really learn Python and/or Perl, you should probably stick to the languages you're comfortable with. – ThisSuitIsBlackNot Dec 9 '16 at 18:18
  • This isn't all that easy, in any language. In Perl there may be modules that can help but you'd still need a good command on the basics of the language. – zdim Dec 9 '16 at 18:22
  • @ThisSuitIsBlackNot Thanks, I am learning python sir. It's libraries really make life easier. I chose C because I know it relatively more. – Vikas Dubey Dec 9 '16 at 18:31
  • 1
    I am a programmer. What are these "elements"? – Borodin Dec 10 '16 at 13:33
0

I'm not sure what you want to get exactly, but this perl generates the same as Navidad20's. It relies on regular expressions. It uses the Regexp::Common module to get the positions of the balanced parentheses and a simple while loop to get the positions of the 'free' elements. It counts beginning at 1, not beginning at 0.

I don't know how it would behave with invalid data.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use Regexp::Common qw /balanced/;

my $seq = '(((((((..((((.....(..)))).((((.........)))).....(((((..)....))))))))))))....';

while ($seq =~ /(?=($RE{balanced}{-parens=>'()'}))/g) {
    print 1 + $-[1], ' ',  $+[1], " $1\n";
}

my @free;
push @free, [ 1 + $-[0] .. $+[0] ] while $seq =~ /\.+/g;

use Data::Dumper; print Dumper \@free;

Output is:

1 72 (((((((..((((.....(..)))).((((.........)))).....(((((..)....))))))))))))
2 71 ((((((..((((.....(..)))).((((.........)))).....(((((..)....)))))))))))
3 70 (((((..((((.....(..)))).((((.........)))).....(((((..)....))))))))))
4 69 ((((..((((.....(..)))).((((.........)))).....(((((..)....)))))))))
5 68 (((..((((.....(..)))).((((.........)))).....(((((..)....))))))))
6 67 ((..((((.....(..)))).((((.........)))).....(((((..)....)))))))
7 66 (..((((.....(..)))).((((.........)))).....(((((..)....))))))
10 65 ((((.....(..)))).((((.........)))).....(((((..)....)))))
11 25 (((.....(..))))
12 24 ((.....(..)))
13 23 (.....(..))
19 22 (..)
27 43 ((((.........))))
28 42 (((.........)))
29 41 ((.........))
30 40 (.........)
49 64 (((((..)....))))
50 63 ((((..)....)))
51 62 (((..)....))
52 61 ((..)....)
53 56 (..)
$VAR1 = [
          [
            8,
            9
          ],
          [
            14,
            15,
            16,
            17,
            18
          ],
          [
            20,
            21
          ],
          [
            26
          ],
          [
            31,
            32,
            33,
            34,
            35,
            36,
            37,
            38,
            39
          ],
          [
            44,
            45,
            46,
            47,
            48
          ],
          [
            54,
            55
          ],
          [
            57,
            58,
            59,
            60
          ],
          [
            73,
            74,
            75,
            76
          ]
        ];
1

Here's a potential solution. Free contains a list that indexes each dot and pairs contains a list of tuples that have the indexes of each pair. this runs on the assumption that your data is perfect (i.e. same number of left and right pairs, no right pairs before left pairs.) Nevertheless, this can be modified to check for edge cases. Based on your question I started the index at 1 instead of 0.

data = '(((((((..((((.....(..)))).((((.........)))).....(((((..)....))))))))))))....'

left = []
group = []
prev = ''

free = []
pairs = []

for index, elem in enumerate(data, 1):
    if elem == '.' and prev == '.':
        group.append(index)
    elif elem == '.':
        group = [index]
    else:
        if len(group) >= 1:
            free.append(group)
            group = []
        if elem == '(':
            left.append(index)
        elif elem == ')':
            pairs.append([left.pop(), index])
    prev = elem
if len(group) > 0:
    free.append(group)
pairs.sort()

Output:

[[1, 72], [2, 71], [3, 70], [4, 69], [5, 68], [6, 67], [7, 66], [10, 65], [11, 25], [12, 24], [13, 23], [19, 22], [27, 43], [28, 42], [29, 41], [30, 40], [49, 64], [50, 63], [51, 62], [52, 61], [53, 56]]
[[8, 9], [14, 15, 16, 17, 18], [20, 21], [26], [31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39], [44, 45, 46, 47, 48], [54, 55], [57, 58, 59, 60]]

The code works by iterating once over each element. If it encounters a left paren, it appends the index to a list. When it then encounters a right paren, it pops off the index of the last seen left paren creating a pair. As for the free dots, keeping track of the previous element tells you how to handle each dot. If one has been seen, continue to add to the current list, otherwise start a new list.

  • It's partially incorrect. Free region information should also come in groups e.g. 8,9 is one 14,15,16,17,18 is another. Also, if you can briefly explain the logic it will be great help thanks !! – Vikas Dubey Dec 9 '16 at 18:49
  • It's incorrect. 10-25 are connected (not 10-65). Free region information should also come in groups e.g. 8,9 is one 14,15,16,17,18 is another. Also, if you can briefly explain the logic it will be great help thanks !! – Vikas Dubey Dec 9 '16 at 18:57
  • are you indexing from 0 or 1? – Navidad20 Dec 9 '16 at 18:59
  • I fixed the second part, I guess i need clarification on what you want for the pairs – Navidad20 Dec 9 '16 at 19:06
  • @ Navidad20 I am index from 1 like you. There was a mistake sorry ( 1-72 is correct) but 10-25 are connected not 10-65. – Vikas Dubey Dec 9 '16 at 19:06
0

The best way to really solve such a question is by maintaining a stack. For every ( that is encountered, you can push the index value into the stack and for every ) you need to pop the stack with the number where the last ( index was inserted. This means that the index of the ( and that of the ) form a pair.

This can be achieved by doing something like this

seq = '(((((((..((((.....(..)))).((((.........)))).....(((((..)....))))))))))))....'
xStack = []
for i, x in enumerate(seq):
    if x == '(':
        xStack.append(i)
    if x == ')':
        o = xStack.pop()

Now having the basic steps in place, there are a few more things that you'd need along with maintaining the index of the parenthesis. After the pop operation you'd need to store the matching pair , to do this, lets introduce another variable and basically do nothing when we encounter the .

seq = '(((((((..((((.....(..)))).((((.........)))).....(((((..)....))))))))))))....'

xStack = []

resultingPairs = []

for i, x in enumerate(seq):
    if x == '(':
        xStack.append(i)
    if x == ')':
        o = xStack.pop()
        tempPair = [o, i]
        resultingPairs.append(tempPair)
    if x == '.':
        pass

Now that we have the resulting pairs which look like this

[[18, 21], [12, 22], [11, 23], [10, 24], [29, 39], [28, 40], [27, 41], [26, 42], [52, 55], [51, 60], [50, 61], [49, 62], [48, 63], [9, 64], [6, 65], [5, 66], [4, 67], [3, 68], [2, 69], [1, 70], [0, 71]]

we need to find out where all the free spaces are, this can be easily done by doing something as follows

spacesList = [i for i in range(len(seq)) if seq.startswith('.', i)]

which results in

[7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20, 25, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 53, 54, 56, 57, 58, 59, 72, 73, 74, 75]

You can now easily write a function where you pass the spacesList and the resultingPairs and get the number of free spaces between each possible pair. There are a lot of optimizations possible but this should be able to get you started in the right direction.

def getSpacesCount(spacesList, resultingPairs):
    for pair in resultingPairs:
        a = pair[0]
        b = pair[1]
        spacesCount = 0
        for val in spacesList:
            if a < val < b:
                spacesCount+=1
        print a,b,spacesCount

seq = '(((((((..((((.....(..)))).((((.........)))).....(((((..)....))))))))))))....'
xStack = []
resultingPairs = []
for i, x in enumerate(seq):
    if x == '(':
        xStack.append(i)
    if x == ')':
        o = xStack.pop()
        tempPair = [o, i]
        resultingPairs.append(tempPair)
    if x == '.':
        pass

spacesList = [i for i in range(len(seq)) if seq.startswith('.', i)]

getSpacesCount(spacesList, resultingPairs)

and you have the values of position of opening parenthesis, closing parenthesis and the number of free spaces between them.

>>> getSpacesCount(spacesList, resultingPairs)
18 21 2
12 22 7
11 23 7
10 24 7
29 39 9
28 40 9
27 41 9
26 42 9
52 55 2
51 60 6
50 61 6
49 62 6
48 63 6
9 64 28
6 65 30
5 66 30
4 67 30
3 68 30
2 69 30
1 70 30
0 71 30

Edit Can't seem to figure out how to edit stackoverflow's comments, Update the function to

def getSpacesCount(spacesList, resultingPairs):
    for pair in resultingPairs:
        a = pair[0]
        b = pair[1]
        spacesCount = 0
        spaces = []
        for val in spacesList:
            if a < val < b:
                spaces.append(val)
                spacesCount+=1
        print a,b,spacesCount,spaces

This will give you both count and positions. You can keep whichever one you really like.

>>> getSpacesCount(spacesList, resultingPairs)
18 21 2 [19, 20]
12 22 7 [13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20]
11 23 7 [13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20]
10 24 7 [13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20]
29 39 9 [30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38]
28 40 9 [30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38]
27 41 9 [30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38]
26 42 9 [30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38]
52 55 2 [53, 54]
51 60 6 [53, 54, 56, 57, 58, 59]
50 61 6 [53, 54, 56, 57, 58, 59]
49 62 6 [53, 54, 56, 57, 58, 59]
48 63 6 [53, 54, 56, 57, 58, 59]
9 64 28 [13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20, 25, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 53, 54, 56, 57, 58, 59]
6 65 30 [7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20, 25, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 53, 54, 56, 57, 58, 59]
5 66 30 [7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20, 25, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 53, 54, 56, 57, 58, 59]
4 67 30 [7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20, 25, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 53, 54, 56, 57, 58, 59]
3 68 30 [7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20, 25, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 53, 54, 56, 57, 58, 59]
2 69 30 [7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20, 25, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 53, 54, 56, 57, 58, 59]
1 70 30 [7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20, 25, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 53, 54, 56, 57, 58, 59]
0 71 30 [7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20, 25, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 53, 54, 56, 57, 58, 59]
  • Hi , You got the pairing correct. However, Just like pairing I need to free regions location information e.g. [8-9] , [14-15-16-17-18]. Sorry if my question created confusion. I am not interested in finding out how many dotes are there. Also, it will help if my index starts from 1. Thanks !! – Vikas Dubey Dec 9 '16 at 19:24
  • That's pretty simple given the code already, change the function to be – Sudheesh Singanamalla Dec 9 '16 at 19:26
  • <pre> def getSpacesCount(spacesList, resultingPairs): for pair in resultingPairs: a = pair[0] b = pair[1] spacesCount = 0 spaces = [] for val in spacesList: if a < val < b: spaces.append(val) spacesCount+=1 print a,b,spacesCount,spaces </pre> – Sudheesh Singanamalla Dec 9 '16 at 19:26
  • Vikas, Please find the Edit in the answer. – Sudheesh Singanamalla Dec 9 '16 at 19:31
  • "Can't seem to figure out how to edit stackoverflow's comments" There's an edit icon (a pencil) next to each comment. You can edit comments only for five minutes. – Borodin Dec 9 '16 at 19:35

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