14

How do I convert a list in Python 3.5 such as:

x=[1, 3, 5]

to an integer (int) of 135 ?

2
  • 2
    The title just says "integers" for the list elements. Which value should be returned for, say, [-3,14,0,-163], ? Dec 10, 2016 at 11:40
  • 1
    But your description says nothing about that list being invalid, nor about literals (list elements cannot be variables?), nor about base 10. (And it does say the output should be a single integer, not "invalid literal".) Dec 10, 2016 at 12:23

5 Answers 5

30

Here is a more mathematical way that does not have to convert back and forth to string. Note that it will only work if 0 <= i <= 9.

>>> x = [1, 3, 5]
>>> sum(d * 10**i for i, d in enumerate(x[::-1]))
135

The idea is to multiply each element in the list by its corresponding power of 10 and then to sum the result.

1
  • 3
    If you wanted it to be efficient, would've it be better to do reversed(x) rather than x[::-1]? The latter has to create an entirely new list, but the former just a generator.
    – Justin
    Dec 11, 2016 at 0:20
28

If you have a list of ints and you want to join them together, you can use map with str to convert them to strings, join them on the empty string and then cast back to ints with int.

In code, this looks like this:

r = int("".join(map(str, x)))

and r now has the wanted value of 135.

This, of course, is a limited approach that comes with some conditions. It requires the list in question to contain nothing else but positive ints (as your sample) or strings representing ints, else the steps of conversion to string might fail or the joining of (negative) numbers will be clunky.

6
  • This is slower than computing the value numerically, but has the benefit of working for bases larger than 10.
    – chepner
    Dec 9, 2016 at 20:20
  • @chepner it will be faster with large numbers and your version is generally faster with smaller number (30 digit and less on my pc). Dec 9, 2016 at 20:31
  • 1
    Worth noting that this version will fail if the first integer is 0.
    – asmeurer
    Dec 10, 2016 at 20:09
  • 2
    @asmeurer the solution isn't meant to address all possible inputs, just the one OP provided. I'm actually failing to see how a 0 in the beginning would make it fail though (the int call will drop any leading zeros from the string while converting it). Dec 10, 2016 at 20:15
  • @asmeurer int doesn't try to infer the base from the string literal; it uses base 10 unless otherwise specified by the optional second argument.
    – chepner
    Dec 11, 2016 at 2:56
23

Using only math (no conversions to or from strings), you can use the reduce function (functools.reduce in Python 3)

b = reduce(lambda total, d: 10*total + d, x, 0)

This makes use of Horner's rule, which factors the polynomial representing the number to reduce the number of multiplications. For example,

1357 = 1*10*10*10 + 3*10*10 + 5*10 + 7     # 6 multiplications
     = ((1*10 + 3)*10 + 5)*10 + 7          # 3 multiplications

As a result, this is faster than computing powers of 10 or creating a string and converting the result to an integer.

>>> timeit.timeit('reduce(lambda t,d: 10*t+d, x, 0)', 'from functools import reduce; x=[1,3,5,7]')
0.7217515400843695
>>> timeit.timeit('int("".join(map(str, [1,3,5,7])))')
1.425914661027491
>>> timeit.timeit('sum(d * 10**i for i, d in enumerate(x[::-1]))', 'x=[1,3,5,7]')
1.897974518011324

In fairness, string conversion is faster once the number of digits gets larger.

>>> import timeit

# 30 digits
>>> setup='from functools import reduce; x=[5, 2, 6, 8, 4, 6, 6, 4, 8, 0, 3, 1, 7, 6, 8, 2, 9, 9, 9, 5, 4, 5, 5, 4, 3, 6, 9, 2, 2, 1]' 
>>> print(timeit.timeit('reduce(lambda t,d: 10*t+d, x, 0)', setup))
6.520374411018565
>>> print(timeit.timeit('int("".join(map(str, x)))', setup))
6.797425839002244
>>> print(timeit.timeit('sum(d * 10**i for i, d in enumerate(x[::-1]))', setup))
19.430233853985555

# 60 digits
>>> setup='from functools import reduce; x=2*[5, 2, 6, 8, 4, 6, 6, 4, 8, 0, 3, 1, 7, 6, 8, 2, 9, 9, 9, 5, 4, 5, 5, 4, 3, 6, 9, 2, 2, 1]' 
>>> print(timeit.timeit('reduce(lambda t,d: 10*t+d, x, 0)', setup))
13.648188541992567
>>> print(timeit.timeit('int("".join(map(str, x)))', setup))
12.864593736943789
>>> print(timeit.timeit('sum(d * 10**i for i, d in enumerate(x[::-1]))', setup))
44.141602706047706

# 120 digits!
>>> setup='from functools import reduce; x=4*[5, 2, 6, 8, 4, 6, 6, 4, 8, 0, 3, 1, 7, 6, 8, 2, 9, 9, 9, 5, 4, 5, 5, 4, 3, 6, 9, 2, 2, 1]' 
>>> print(timeit.timeit('reduce(lambda t,d: 10*t+d, x, 0)', setup))
28.364255172084086
>>> print(timeit.timeit('int("".join(map(str, x)))', setup))
25.184791765059344
>>> print(timeit.timeit('sum(d * 10**i for i, d in enumerate(x[::-1]))', setup))
99.88558598596137
9
  • 1
    @LoïcFaure-Lacroix The OP specifically asks about an array of integers
    – brianpck
    Dec 9, 2016 at 20:09
  • @brianpck yes, I know but generic is sometimes better than not. Btw, the timeit tests are a good way to test things. What the answer doesn't say that the reduce method will get worse with big numbers. It's good with smaller numbers but as soon as it will get numbers with a length of around 30 numbers, the str version will be the fastest solution. Dec 9, 2016 at 20:26
  • @LoïcFaure-Lacroix Good point, I tested the two numeric solutions with larger lists, but not the string conversion one. (I was curious about whether the overhead of user-defined functions would lose out, but I guess a linear number of function calls is still better than a quadratic number of multiplications.)
    – chepner
    Dec 9, 2016 at 20:37
  • My guess to explain why the mathematical method will get worse with large numbers is that adding large numbers is harder to do than converting a string to a large number once. The thing is that the string can technically convert the str to a large number directly. Not sure how they are stored in python, but I've seens a couple of BigNumber libararies storing large numbers as strings... But adding large number requires more arithmetic operation as numbers can't be stored completely in memory. Dec 9, 2016 at 20:40
  • 2
    Thumbs up! That's a quite complete answer! Your solution is probably the best one with integers and "real" world number unless it's used for cryptography. Dec 9, 2016 at 21:06
1

If you don't like map you can always use a list comprehension:

s = [str(i) for i in x]
r = int("".join(s))
1
  • ...and if you like list comprehensions you can always use a generator expression, and avoid one of the loops: int("".join(str(i) for i in x))
    – Kroltan
    Dec 10, 2016 at 22:08
0
import time
from datetime import timedelta


start_time = time.monotonic()

x=[1, 3, 5]
y =""
for i in x:
    y += str(i)
print(int(y))

end_time = time.monotonic()
print(f'Duration: {timedelta(seconds=end_time - start_time)}')

Another approach to convert list of integer. Produces Output:

135
Duration: 0:00:00.000105

[Program finished]

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