126

I'd like to update element's text dynamically:

<div>
   **text to change**
   <someChild>
       text that should not change
   </someChild>
   <someChild>
       text that should not change
   </someChild>
</div>

I'm new to jQuery, so this task seems to be quite challenging for me. Could someone point me to a function/selector to use?

If it is possible, I'd like to do it without adding a new container for the text I need to change.

  • 7
    “If it is possible, I'd like to do it without adding a new container for the text I need to change.” — really? Because it’d be much easier with a container in there. – Paul D. Waite Nov 5 '10 at 14:31
  • Guys, I looked at the original question and I don't think that the OP said anything about child elements... – Šime Vidas Nov 5 '10 at 14:33
  • According to W3 standards div can't even have text nodes (if i remember correct). A text container like <p>, <h1>, etc should be added. – Mark Baijens Nov 5 '10 at 14:37
  • 2
    @Mark: possibly in (X)HTML Strict, but not any more. (HTML5 is here now.) – Paul D. Waite Nov 5 '10 at 14:43
  • @Matt Ball: In actual html there are span tags instead of someChild. – ika Nov 5 '10 at 14:43

14 Answers 14

81

Mark’s got a better solution using jQuery, but you might be able to do this in regular JavaScript too.

In Javascript, the childNodes property gives you all the child nodes of an element, including text nodes.

So, if you knew the text you wanted to change was always going to be the first thing in the element, then given e.g. this HTML:

<div id="your_div">
   **text to change**
   <p>
       text that should not change
   </p>
   <p>
       text that should not change
   </p>
</div>

You could do this:

var your_div = document.getElementById('your_div');

var text_to_change = your_div.childNodes[0];

text_to_change.nodeValue = 'new text';

Of course, you can still use jQuery to select the <div> in the first place (i.e. var your_div = $('your_div').get(0);).

  • 1
    No need to replace the text node. Just change the existing one's data or nodeValue property. – Tim Down Nov 5 '10 at 15:13
  • @Tim: ah, I thought there must be an easier way. Never did much JavaScript before jQuery came along. Cheers, I’ll edit the answer accordingly. – Paul D. Waite Nov 5 '10 at 16:22
  • 11
    So a more up to date implementation of this answer would be $('#yourDivId')[0].childNodes[0].nodeValue = 'New Text'; – Dean Martin May 2 '14 at 9:50
  • By far the shortest and simplest solution - stackoverflow.com/a/54365288/4769218 – Silver Ringvee Jan 25 '19 at 12:24
  • 1
    "You might be able to do this in regular javascript too" – duhaime Jan 25 '19 at 12:25
66

Update 2018

Since this is a pretty popular answer I decided to update and beautify it a little by adding the textnode selector to jQuery as a plugin.

In the snippet below you can see that I define a new jQuery function that gets all (and only) the textNodes. You can chain of this function as well with for example the first() function. I do a trim on the text node and check if it's not empty after the trim because spaces, tabs, new lines, etc. are also recognized as text nodes. If you need those nodes too then simple remove that from the if statement in the jQuery function.

I added an example how to replace first text node and how to replace all text nodes.

This approach makes it easier to read the code and easier to use it multiple times and with different purposes.

The Update 2017 (adrach) should still work as well if you prefer that.

As jQuery extension

//Add a jQuery extension so it can be used on any jQuery object
jQuery.fn.textNodes = function() {
  return this.contents().filter(function() {
    return (this.nodeType === Node.TEXT_NODE && this.nodeValue.trim() !== "");
  });
}

//Use the jQuery extension
$(document).ready(function(){
  $('#replaceAll').on('click', () => {
    $('#testSubject').textNodes().replaceWith('Replaced');
  });

  $('#replaceFirst').on('click', () => {
    $('#testSubject').textNodes().first().replaceWith('Replaced First');
  });
});
p {
  margin: 0px;
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<div id="testSubject">
   **text to change**
   <p>text that should not change</p>
   <p>text that should not change</p>
   **also text to change**
   <p>text that should not change</p>
   <p>text that should not change</p>
   **last text to change**
</div>
<button id="replaceFirst">Replace First</button>
<button id="replaceAll">Replace All</button>

Javascript (ES) eqivilant

//Add a new function to the HTMLElement object so it cna be used on any HTMLElement
HTMLElement.prototype.textNodes = function() {
  return [...this.childNodes].filter((node) => {
    return (node.nodeType === Node.TEXT_NODE && node.nodeValue.trim() !== "");
  });
}

//Use the new HTMLElement function
document.addEventListener('DOMContentLoaded', () => {
  document.querySelector('#replaceAll').addEventListener('click', () => {
    document.querySelector('#testSubject').textNodes().forEach((node) => {
      node.textContent = 'Replaced';
    });
  });

  document.querySelector('#replaceFirst').addEventListener('click', function() {
    document.querySelector('#testSubject').textNodes()[0].textContent = 'Replaced First';
  });
});
p {
  margin: 0px;
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<div id="testSubject">
  **text to change**
  <p>text that should not change</p>
  <p>text that should not change</p>
  **also text to change**
  <p>text that should not change</p>
  <p>text that should not change</p>
  **last text to change**
</div>
<button id="replaceFirst">Replace First</button>
<button id="replaceAll">Replace All</button>


Update 2017 (adrach):

It looks like several things changed since this was posted. Here is an updated version

$("div").contents().filter(function(){ return this.nodeType == 3; }).first().replaceWith("change text");

Original answer (Not working for current versions)

$("div").contents().filter(function(){ return this.nodeType == 3; })
.filter(':first').text("change text");

Source: http://api.jquery.com/contents/

  • Aha! I knew there’d be a clever jQuery function somewhere. Only problem with the solution as you’ve written it is that every text node gets the next text (e.g. including the ones within child elements). I guess it wouldn’t be too hard to limit it though? – Paul D. Waite Nov 5 '10 at 14:53
  • 10
    I had some trouble using .filter(':first'), but using .first() instead worked for me. Thanks! – hollaburoo Feb 23 '12 at 18:49
  • 16
    This doesn't work for me with .text() (see this jsfiddle) but does with .replaceWith() (jsfiddle here). – magicalex May 2 '12 at 8:45
  • 2
    This works for me, ugly as it is textObject = $(myNode).contents().filter(function(){ return this.nodeType == 3; })[0] $(textObject).replaceWith("my text"); – Maragues Sep 25 '12 at 11:56
  • anyone curious about nodeType=3 it is mean filter only node type of "TEXT", w3schools.com/jsref/prop_node_nodetype.asp for more info – ktutnik Jan 9 '15 at 4:09
54

See In action

Markup :

$(function() {
  $('input[type=button]').one('click', function() {
    var cache = $('#parent').children();
    $('#parent').text('Altered Text').append(cache);
  });
});
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<div id="parent">Some text
  <div>Child1</div>
  <div>Child2</div>
  <div>Child3</div>
  <div>Child4</div>
</div>
<input type="button" value="alter text" />

  • 6
    By far the best solution I've came across. Elegant and simple. – Yoav Kadosh Jun 24 '13 at 5:51
  • 3
    This won't preserve the order of the nodes, however. e.g. if the text was at the end of the element first, it would now be at the start. – Matthias Aug 31 '15 at 17:47
  • It won't preserve order but in most cases you want the text as the first or last node. So if append() doesn't get the desired result, try prepend() if you want the existing children infront of the text. – Sensei Dec 10 '15 at 20:17
  • By far the shortest and simplest solution - stackoverflow.com/a/54365288/4769218 – Silver Ringvee Jan 25 '19 at 12:25
11
<div id="divtochange">
    **text to change**
    <div>text that should not change</div>
    <div>text that should not change</div>
</div>
$(document).ready(function() {
    $("#divtochange").contents().filter(function() {
            return this.nodeType == 3;
        })
        .replaceWith("changed text");
});

This changes only the first textnode

10

Just wrap the text you want to change in a span with a class to select.

Doesn't necessarily answer your question I know, but, probably a better coding practice. Keep things clean and simple

<div id="header">
   <span class="my-text">**text to change**</span>
   <div>
       text that should not change
   </div>
   <div>
       text that should not change
   </div>
</div>

Voilà!

$('#header .mytext').text('New text here')
  • This is the best solution! – Sleek Geek Mar 15 '20 at 10:07
  • Simple and straightforward solution. Saved my day. – invinciblemuffi Jan 12 at 12:11
5

For the specific case you mentioned:

<div id="foo">
   **text to change**
   <someChild>
       text that should not change
   </someChild>
   <someChild>
       text that should not change
   </someChild>
</div>

... this is very easy:

var div = document.getElementById("foo");
div.firstChild.data = "New text";

You don't state how you want to generalize this. If, say, you want to change the text of the first text node within the <div>, you could do something like this:

var child = div.firstChild;
while (child) {
    if (child.nodeType == 3) {
        child.data = "New text";
        break;
    }
    child = child.nextSibling;
}
2

$.fn.textPreserveChildren = function(text) {
  return this.each(function() {
    return $(this).contents().filter(function() {
      return this.nodeType == 3;
    }).first().replaceWith(text);
  })
}

setTimeout(function() {
  $('.target').textPreserveChildren('Modified');
}, 2000);
.blue {
  background: #77f;
}
.green {
  background: #7f7;
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.0/jquery.min.js"></script>

<div class="target blue">Outer text
  <div>Nested element</div>
</div>

<div class="target green">Another outer text
  <div>Another nested element</div>
</div>

1

Simple answer:

$("div").contents().filter(function(){ 
  return this.nodeType == 3; 
})[0].nodeValue = "The text you want to replace with"
1

Here is yet another method : http://jsfiddle.net/qYUBp/7/

HTML

<div id="header">
   **text to change**
   <div>
       text that should not change
   </div>
   <div>
       text that should not change
   </div>
</div>

JQUERY

var tmp=$("#header>div").html();
$("#header").text("its thursday").append(tmp);
1

Lots of great answers here but they only handle one text node with children. In my case I needed to operate on all text nodes and ignore html children BUT PRESERVE THE ORDERING.

So if we have a case like this:

<div id="parent"> Some text
    <div>Child1</div>
    <div>Child2</div>
    and some other text
    <div>Child3</div>
    <div>Child4</div>
    and here we are again
</div>

We can use the following code to modify the text only AND PRESERVE THE ORDERING

    $('#parent').contents().filter(function() {
        return this.nodeType == Node.TEXT_NODE && this.nodeValue.trim() != '';
    }).each(function() {
    		//You can ignore the span class info I added for my particular application.
        $(this).replaceWith(this.nodeValue.replace(/(\w+)/g,"<span class='IIIclassIII$1' onclick='_mc(this)' onmouseover='_mr(this);' onmouseout='_mt(this);'>$1X</span>"));
	});
<script src="https://code.jquery.com/jquery-3.0.0.min.js"></script>
<div id="parent"> Some text
    <div>Child1</div>
    <div>Child2</div>
    and some other text
    <div>Child3</div>
    <div>Child4</div>
    and here we are again
</div>

Here is the jsfiddle of it working

0

I think you're looking for .prependTo().

http://api.jquery.com/prependTo/

We can also select an element on the page and insert it into another:

$('h2').prependTo($('.container'));

If an element selected this way is inserted elsewhere, it will be moved into the target (not cloned):

<div class="container">  
  <h2>Greetings</h2>
  <div class="inner">Hello</div>
  <div class="inner">Goodbye</div> 
</div>

If there is more than one target element, however, cloned copies of the inserted element will be created for each target after the first.

  • 2
    I think not. It sounds like the OP is looking for a way to change the text, not add new text. – Matt Ball Nov 5 '10 at 14:46
0

Problem with Mark's answer is that you get empty textnodes aswell. Solution as jQuery plugin:

$.fn.textnodes = function () {
    return this.contents().filter(function (i,n) {
        return n.nodeType == 3 && n.textContent.trim() !== "";
    });
};

$("div").textnodes()[0] = "changed text";
0

This is an old question but you can make a simple function like this to make your life easier:

$.fn.toText = function(str) {
    var cache = this.children();
    this.text(str).append(cache);
}

Example:

<div id="my-div">
   **text to change**
   <p>
       text that should not change
   </p>
   <p>
       text that should not change
   </p>
</div>

Usage:

$("#my-div").toText("helloworld");
0

2019 vesrsion - Short & Simple

document.querySelector('#your-div-id').childNodes[0].nodeValue = 'new text';

Explanation

document.querySelector('#your-div-id') is used for selecting the parent (the element which text you are about to change)

.childNodes[0] selects the text node

.nodeValue = 'new text' sets text node value to "new text"


This answer is possibly inspired by Dean Martin's comment. Can't say for sure since I've been using this solution for years now. Just thought I should post this probability here because some people care about it more than the fact that this is the best solution.

  • 2
    You just copied Dean Martin's comment from 2014 and claim this as your 2019 solution. Also use a unnecessary combination of jQuery and plain Javascript which in my opinion is bad practice for good readability. Last you didn't put any details about how your solution works. It's not the most complicated but neither is this issue so it are probably pretty new programmers who read this who could use some extra explanation for example that you get the native DOM node from the jQuery object by accessing the array index. – Mark Baijens May 1 '19 at 14:10
  • @MarkBaijens I think you might be right, Dean Martin's comment might be where I got this snippet years ago. Anyways, I've been using it ever since and just copied it from my personal code repo (where I list useful scripts) in January. Added a more detailed explanation and removed unnecessary jQuery. – Silver Ringvee May 2 '19 at 15:26
  • This is by far the simplest solution which actually works and people should use it, although you don't get any kudos for pawning it off as your own without giving credit to Dean Martin. I also agree with Mark Baijens that the pure Vanilla JS implementation in this case is better than mixing up jQuery and Vanilla JS. Not just for better readability, but also for better performance as jQuery slows things down. – Miqi180 Sep 28 '19 at 18:28
  • @Miqi180 - as I already said above, this is possible, I don't remember where I first got this solution. I've been using it in my work for years now. Added a note in the answer. Hopefully, it helps people like you who don't care about the best solution here on SO: – Silver Ringvee Sep 30 '19 at 8:01

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