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I'm stuck on a particular logic. I have two arrays and I need to check if those two arrays' values are equal and in same order. Looping is also allowed. Let's say:

array1 = {4, 3, 2, 1}
array2 = {1, 4, 3, 2} -- true. 

array1 = {4, 3, 2, 1}
array2 = {2, 1, 4, 3} -- true. 

Duplicates are allowed in array values. I cannot sort the arrays as duplicates are allowed and it'll mess up the array order.

  • Iterate the array and check the values – JoBⅈN Dec 10 '16 at 8:13
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    Java or Lua? Make your choice already. – Jiri Tousek Dec 10 '16 at 8:13
  • 2
    So you need to see if the values are in the same order, but they can start at any point in the array and wrap-around? – Dan Armstrong Dec 10 '16 at 8:43
  • @DanArmstrong. Exactly. – Mithun Porandla Dec 10 '16 at 8:59
  • Why is this even tagged Lua? – warspyking Dec 10 '16 at 14:47
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You could write your nested loops, but let's think a bit differently. If we append the second array to itself, we could just do a "indexOf" operation of the first array on the second. Here's a bit of untested code showing the idea:

public static boolean arraysMatch(int[] array1, int[] array2) {
    int[] combined = new int[array2.length * 2];
    System.arraycopy(array2, 0, combined, 0, array2.length);
    System.arraycopy(array2, 0, combined, array2.length, array2.length);
    return Collections.indexOfSubList(Arrays.asList(combined), Arrays.asList(array1)) != -1;
}

Or a more list-centric approach:

public static boolean arraysMatch(int[] array1, int[] array2) {
    List<Integer> combined = new ArrayList<>(array2.length * 2);
    List<Integer> array2List = Arrays.asList(array2);
    combined.addAll(array2List);
    combined.addAll(array2List);
    return Collections.indexOfSubList(combined, Arrays.asList(array1)) != -1;
}

You can do looping and not copy data around, but it's a matter of programmer time vs. CPU time.

Edit: I know answer accepted, but it's still not really complete. If allowed to use Apache Commons Lang: https://commons.apache.org/proper/commons-lang/javadocs/api-2.6/org/apache/commons/lang/ArrayUtils.html

public static boolean arraysMatch(int[] array1, int[] array2) {
    return Collections.indexOfSubList(
        Arrays.asList(ArrayUtils.toObject(ArrayUtils.addAll(array2, array2))),
        Arrays.asList(ArrayUtils.toObject(array1))
    ) != -1;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Creative; nice balance between code clarity and performance. At least in Java 8 Arrays.asList() does not accept an int array. – Ole V.V. Dec 10 '16 at 9:13
  • Looks like might need to manually populate List<Integer> sadly, since Java doesn't seem to have any direct array operations and we need to use the Collections class for indexOfSubList. – Dan Armstrong Dec 10 '16 at 9:19
  • If O.P. is allowed to use Commons Lang: commons.apache.org/proper/commons-lang ArrayUtils.toObject can bridge the gap: commons.apache.org/proper/commons-lang/javadocs/api-2.6/org/… – Dan Armstrong Dec 10 '16 at 9:25
  • Final point: I didn't check the array lengths, which one might need to do depending on requirements. Would want to make sure the lengths match. This dead horse is well beaten. Signing off. – Dan Armstrong Dec 10 '16 at 9:34
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try this:

Code:

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Arrays;

public class ArrayComparison {

    //  Create arrays
    private static int[] array1 = new int[] {2,3,4,7,1};
    private static int[] array2 = new int[] {2,3,4,7,1};
    private static int[] array3 = new int[] {1,7,4,2,3};
    private static int[] array4 = new int[] {1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9};
    private static int[] array5 = new int[] {2,3,4,5,1};

    public static void main(String args[]){
        System.out.println(compareArrays(array1, array2));  // True
        System.out.println(compareArrays(array1, array3));  // True
        System.out.println(compareArrays(array1, array4));  // False
        System.out.println(compareArrays(array1, array5));  // False
    }

    /**
     * Compares if a1 is equal than a2, no matter the order
     * @param a1 Array 1
     * @param a2 Array 2
     * @return True if a1 == a2, false if a1 != a2. no matter the order
     */
    private static boolean compareArrays(int[] a1, int[] a2){
        boolean areEqual=false;
        //  Clone
        int[] a1Aux = a1.clone();
        int[] a2Aux = a2.clone();
        //  Sort
        Arrays.sort(a1Aux);
        Arrays.sort(a2Aux);
        //  Compare
        if(a1Aux.length == a2Aux.length){
            for(int i=0;i<a1Aux.length;i++){
                if(a1Aux[i] != a2Aux[i]){
                    return areEqual;
                }
            }
            return true;
        }
        return areEqual;
    }
}

Output:

true
true
false
false
| improve this answer | |
  • I doubt that it will return true for the two cases menitoned in the question. Maybe the OP will be able to stick in a nested loop to take those into account. – Ole V.V. Dec 10 '16 at 9:05
  • @OleV.V. You're right, code edited ;) – Dani Dec 10 '16 at 9:17
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This is straightforward (but very inefficient, involves a lot of copying). I stick with arrays of ints (no lists or other collections, no Integer objects).

public static boolean arraysWrappedEqual(int[] array1, int[] array2) {
    if (array1.length != array2.length) {
        return false;
    }
    for (int array2startIndex = 0; array2startIndex < array2.length; array2startIndex++) {
        // compare beginning of array1 with end of array2 and vice versa
        int[] array1beginning = Arrays.copyOfRange(array1, 0, array1.length - array2startIndex);
        int[] array1end = Arrays.copyOfRange(array1, array1.length - array2startIndex, array1.length);
        int[] array2beginning = Arrays.copyOfRange(array2, 0, array2startIndex);
        int[] array2end = Arrays.copyOfRange(array2, array2startIndex, array2.length);
        if (Arrays.equals(array1beginning, array2end) && Arrays.equals(array1end, array2beginning)) {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

It returns true for both the cases in the question.

| improve this answer | |

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