29
#include <set>
#include <string>
#include <string_view>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    string_view key = "hello";

    set<string> coll1;
    coll1.find(key); // error

    set<string, less<>> coll2;
    coll2.find(key); // ok since C++14
}

Then, should it be a rule:

Always prefer set<T, less<>> to set<T> since C++14?

  • 1
    Are you using the transparent comparitor functionality? If not, then why bother? – ildjarn Dec 12 '16 at 4:15
  • @ildjarn: What is "transparent comparitor functionality"? – Nicol Bolas Dec 12 '16 at 4:21
  • 1
    @NicolBolas : Misspelling aside, it's the difference between less<> and less<T>. – ildjarn Dec 12 '16 at 4:29
  • @ildjarn: Oh, that's why Google failed me. Nevermind then. – Nicol Bolas Dec 12 '16 at 4:35
  • string_view is not in C++14 – M.M Dec 15 '16 at 0:31
19

It's trivial to find a counterexample:

#include <set>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

struct converts_to_string {
    operator string() const { return ""; }
};

int main()
{
    converts_to_string key;

    set<string> coll1;
    coll1.find(key); // OK

    set<string, less<>> coll2;
    coll2.find(key); // error
}
  • 2
    ... what's the reason why it doesn't work? Is it because the Standard does not require (forbid?) operator< on basic_string to be a non-member function, and therefore deduction fails? Would it work if operator< for basic_string was defined as a friend (non-template) function? – dyp Dec 12 '16 at 10:12
  • 2
    @dyp Yep, deduction failure because it's a non-member function template (and unlike basic_string_view doesn't have a "sufficient additional overload" rule). And yes, a friend non-template function would make this work (at the cost of one temporary string per comparison, just like your stupid_string). – T.C. Dec 12 '16 at 12:53
10

There can be a performance downside when using associative_container<T, less<>>: Consider a type like

#include <iostream>
#include <set>
#include <string>

struct stupid_string
{
    stupid_string(char const* s)
      : s(s)
    { std::cout << "copy\n"; }

    stupid_string(char const* s, int) // silent
      : s(s)
    {}

    friend bool operator<(stupid_string const& lhs, stupid_string const& rhs);

private:
    std::string s;
};

bool operator<(stupid_string const& lhs, stupid_string const& rhs) {
    return lhs.s < rhs.s;
}

int main() {
    std::set<stupid_string, std::less<>> s;
    s.emplace("hello", 0);
    s.emplace("world", 0);
    s.emplace("foobar", 0);
    std::cout << "find\n";
    (void)s.find("test");
}

Here, the application of operator< in the algorithm performed by s.find will convert the character literal to a stupid_string implicitly. This happens for each comparison performed! Live demo

I know of one case where something similar happened in production code, with a non-conforming C++03 StdLib implementation.


This is by the way the main reason why heterogeneous lookup via less<> was made opt-in; see N3657:

Stephan T. Lavavej suggested that the two problems of preserving existing behaviour and allowing heterogeneous lookups could both be solved by making the containers detect when the comparison object accepts heterogeneous arguments and only conditionally overloading the current lookup functions with template versions.

  • 2
    This is basically the reason heterogeneous lookup was made opt-in. – T.C. Dec 12 '16 at 12:51
  • @T.C. Yes, but I couldn't find a quote :( – dyp Dec 12 '16 at 13:47

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