8

Rust has a useful feature where you can use an existing struct and only override some of its members. For example, a value of the following struct

struct SomeTool {
    pub unique_id: String,
    pub poll: Option<fn(&Context) -> bool>,
    pub exec: Option<fn(&mut Context) -> ToolResult>,
    pub modal: Option<fn(&mut Context) -> ToolResult>,
    pub ui: Option<fn(&mut UIPanel)>,
}

can be initialized by passing in a struct instance (e.g. SomeTool::default()):

new_tool = SomeTool {
    unique_id: "tool.foobar".to_string(),
    exec: Some(foobar_exec)
    .. SomeTool::default()
};

I want to be able to declare SomeTool without having to explicitly list every callback (adding new callbacks in the future may lead to many additions of None all over a codebase).

This works well, but now I could accidentally leave out unique_id for some other initialization, and it would use whatever is in the default.

Is there a way to describe a struct that can have some members overridden but not others?


Note that the real world use-case has more members than this (making the chance of accidents higher), just simplified for the question.

8

Since your unique_id is supposed to be unique, it should not have a Default constructor. But if you remove the Default impl from a hypothetical UniqueId type, then you won't be able to derive Default for SomeTool.

The currently working solution is to move all fields that don't require a value to a sub-struct and not implement Default for SomeTool. Thus you'd be able to use SomeTool as follows:

new_tool = SomeTool {
    unique_id: "tool.foobar".to_string(),
    callbacks: Callbacks {
        exec: Some(foobar_exec),
        .. Callbacks::default()
    }
};

There is a hypothetical feature that Rust might get in the future, which allows you to have two structs with the same fields to be the base expression in a struct expression. That feature would allow you to use the sub-struct to initialize all the fields that the sub-struct and SomeTool have in common, but not more.

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