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So currently I have Busybox installed on an embedded kernel in its /system/bin/ folder and can call manually to the VI editor by typing busybox vi and vi will be executed. HOWEVER, I want to create a symbolic link to busybox vi by just typing vi file.txt instead of busybox vi file.txt so I won't have to type busybox every time. How to do this? I already tried this:

Installing Busybox

If the Busybox executable is renamed to one of the commands it supports, it will act as that command automatically:

 ln -s busybox pwd
 ./pwdfrom

...from Busybox's website but still doesn't work, all it says is on my terminal for which command is:

127|root@nitrogen6x:/system/bin # ln -s busbox which
root@nitrogen6x:/system/bin # which ls
/system/bin/sh: which: not found
127|root@nitrogen6x:/system/bin # ls -la which lrwxrwxrwx root root 1970-01-03 18:15 which -> busbox

any ideas what I'm doing wrong? My $PATH is: /sbin:/vendor/bin:/system/sbin:/system/bin:/system/xbin

  • "I already tried this..." -- Where's the explanation of what you did? Show the results, i.e. do a **ls**`of the link that you created. – sawdust Dec 16 '16 at 9:02
  • 127|root@nitrogen6x:/system/bin # ln -s busbox which root@nitrogen6x:/system/bin # which ls /system/bin/sh: which: not found 127|root@nitrogen6x:/system/bin # ls -la which lrwxrwxrwx root root 1970-01-03 18:15 which -> busbox root@nitrogen6x:/system/bin # which /system/bin/sh: which: not found And thanks for the -1. – Eric Reyna Dec 16 '16 at 14:27
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I figured out how to get this to work

HERE'S HOW:

  1. So I went to root directory:

    cd /

  2. Then I remounted the /system/ directory:

    mount -o rw,remount /system

  3. Then I went into the binary folder where busybox was located:

    cd /system/bin/

  4. Then I used the link command for the busybox binary I wanted:

    ln -s busybox lsusb (remember you must be in /system/bin directory already)

For Already Linked Files:

  1. For already linked files like ls, remove the linked file and replace with Busybox binary instead (I know it sounds crazy but you can always go back to system's binary utilities):

    sudo rm /system/bin/ls ln -s busybox ls (remember you must be in /system/bin directory already)

  2. You should get something like this when you do ls -l ls:

    lrwxrwxrwx 1 0 0 7 Jan 4 21:53 ls -> busybox

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One point to consider is that you have to be on the same file system. For example if you are trying to create a symbolic link from one mounted file system to a file on another file system then that's an issue. If your / and /usr are not on the same mounted file system as there might be the case for embedded systems, then you cannot create a symbolic link /usr/bin/which to point to /bin/busybox. One possible solution is to put a copy of busybox binary in /urs/bin and create link to that.

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