1601

I've been looking for a simple Java algorithm to generate a pseudo-random alpha-numeric string. In my situation it would be used as a unique session/key identifier that would "likely" be unique over 500K+ generation (my needs don't really require anything much more sophisticated).

Ideally, I would be able to specify a length depending on my uniqueness needs. For example, a generated string of length 12 might look something like "AEYGF7K0DM1X".

  • 134
    Beware the birthday paradox. – pablosaraiva Oct 25 '10 at 15:07
  • 52
    Even taking the birthday paradox in consideration, if you use 12 alphanumeric characters (62 total), you would still need well over 34 billion strings to reach the paradox. And the birthday paradox doesn't guarantee a collision anyways, it just says it's over 50% chance. – NullUserException Oct 29 '12 at 4:13
  • 2
    @NullUserException 50 % success chance (per try) is damn high: even with 10 attempts, success rate is 0.999. With that and the fact that you can try A LOT in a period of 24 hours in mind, you don't need 34 billion strings to be pretty sure to guess at least one of them. That is the reason why some session tokens should be really, really long. – Pijusn Jan 31 '15 at 10:28
  • 13
    These 3 single line codes are very much useful i guess.. Long.toHexString(Double.doubleToLongBits(Math.random())); UUID.randomUUID().toString(); RandomStringUtils.randomAlphanumeric(12); – Manindar Jun 8 '16 at 7:31
  • 13
    @Pijusn I know this is old, but... the "50% chance" in the birthday paradox is NOT "per try", it's "50% chance that, out of (in this case) 34 billion strings, there exists at least one pair of duplicates". You'd need 1.6 septillion - 1.6e21 - entries in your database in order for there to be a 50% chance per try. – Walt Oct 11 '17 at 19:21

45 Answers 45

2
public static String getRandomString(int length) {
        char[] chars = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRST".toCharArray();

        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        Random random = new Random();
        for (int i = 0; i < chars.length; i++) {
            char c = chars[random.nextInt(chars.length)];
            sb.append(c);
        }
        String randomStr = sb.toString();

        return randomStr;
    }
1

Best Random String Generator Method

public class RandomStringGenerator{

    private static int randomStringLength = 25 ;
    private static boolean allowSpecialCharacters = true ;
    private static String specialCharacters = "!@$%*-_+:";
    private static boolean allowDuplicates = false ;

    private static boolean isAlphanum = false;
    private static boolean isNumeric = false;
    private static boolean isAlpha = false;
    private static final String alphabet = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";
    private static boolean mixCase = false;
    private static final String capAlpha = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ";
    private static final String num = "0123456789";

    public static String getRandomString() {
        String returnVal = "";
        int specialCharactersCount = 0;
        int maxspecialCharacters = randomStringLength/4;

        try {
            StringBuffer values = buildList();
            for (int inx = 0; inx < randomStringLength; inx++) {
                int selChar = (int) (Math.random() * (values.length() - 1));
                if (allowSpecialCharacters)
                {
                    if (specialCharacters.indexOf("" + values.charAt(selChar)) > -1)
                    {
                        specialCharactersCount ++;
                        if (specialCharactersCount > maxspecialCharacters)
                        {
                            while (specialCharacters.indexOf("" + values.charAt(selChar)) != -1)
                            {
                                selChar = (int) (Math.random() * (values.length() - 1));
                            }
                        }
                    }
                }
                returnVal += values.charAt(selChar);
                if (!allowDuplicates) {
                    values.deleteCharAt(selChar);
                }
            }
        } catch (Exception e) {
            returnVal = "Error While Processing Values";
        }
        return returnVal;
    }

    private static StringBuffer buildList() {
        StringBuffer list = new StringBuffer(0);
        if (isNumeric || isAlphanum) {
            list.append(num);
        }
        if (isAlpha || isAlphanum) {
            list.append(alphabet);
            if (mixCase) {
                list.append(capAlpha);
            }
        }
        if (allowSpecialCharacters)
        {
            list.append(specialCharacters);
        }
        int currLen = list.length();
        String returnVal = "";
        for (int inx = 0; inx < currLen; inx++) {
            int selChar = (int) (Math.random() * (list.length() - 1));
            returnVal += list.charAt(selChar);
            list.deleteCharAt(selChar);
        }
        list = new StringBuffer(returnVal);
        return list;
    }   

}
1

Lots of use of StringBuilder above. I guess it's easy, but requires a function call per char, growing an array, etc... If using the stringbuilder, a suggestion is to specify the required capacity of the string ie.,

new StringBuilder(int capacity);

Here's a version that doesn't use a StringBuilder or String appending, and no dictionary.

public static String randomString(int length)
{
    SecureRandom random = new SecureRandom();
    char[] chars = new char[length];
    for(int i=0;i<chars.length;i++)
    {
        int v = random.nextInt(10 + 26 + 26);
        char c;
        if (v < 10)
        {
            c = (char)('0' + v);
        }
        else if (v < 36)
        {
            c = (char)('a' - 10 + v);
        }
        else
        {
            c = (char)('A' - 36 + v);
        }
        chars[i] = c;
    }
    return new String(chars);
}
1

You can create a character array which includes all the letters and numbers, then you can randomly select from this char array and create your own string password.

char[] chars = new char[62]; // sum of letters and numbers

int i = 0;

    for(char c = 'a'; c <= 'z';c++) { // for letters
        chars[i++] = c;
    }

    for(char c = '0'; c <= '9';c++) { // for numbers
        chars[i++] = c;
    }

    for(char c = 'A'; c <= 'Z';c++) { // for capital letters
        chars[i++] = c;
    }

    int numberOfCodes = 0;
    String code = "";
    while (numberOfCodes < 1) {//enter how much you want to generate at one time
        int numChars = 8; //Enter how many digits you want in your password

        for(i = 0; i < numChars; i++) {
            char c = chars[(int)(Math.random() * chars.length)];
            code = code + c;
        }
        System.out.println("Code is :" + code);
    }
  • 1
    Seems to substantially duplicate my answer, which was given two years before. – erickson Oct 4 '13 at 5:35
1

I have developed an application to develop an auto generated alphanumberic string for my project. In this string, the first three chars are alphabetical and the next seven are integers.

public class AlphaNumericGenerator {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        java.util.Random r = new java.util.Random();
        int i = 1, n = 0;
        char c;
        String str="";
        for (int t = 0; t < 3; t++) {
            while (true) {
                i = r.nextInt(10);
                if (i > 5 && i < 10) {

                    if (i == 9) {
                        i = 90;
                        n = 90;
                        break;
                    }
                    if (i != 90) {
                        n = i * 10 + r.nextInt(10);
                        while (n < 65) {
                            n = i * 10 + r.nextInt(10);
                        }
                    }

                    break;
                }
            }
            c=(char)n;

            str= String.valueOf(c)+str;
        }
        while(true){
        i = r.nextInt(10000000);
        if(i>999999)
            break;
        }
        str=str+i;
        System.out.println(str);

    }
}
1

Here is a Java 8 solution based on streams.

    public String generateString(String alphabet, int length) {
        return generateString(alphabet, length, new SecureRandom()::nextInt);
    }

    // nextInt = bound -> n in [0, bound)
    public String generateString(String source, int length, IntFunction<Integer> nextInt) {
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        IntStream.generate(source::length)
                .boxed()
                .limit(length)
                .map(nextInt::apply)
                .map(source::charAt)
                .forEach(sb::append);

        return sb.toString();
    }

Use it like

String alphabet = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ0123456789";
int length = 12;
String generated = generateString(alphabet, length);
System.out.println(generated);

The function nextInt should accept an int bound and return a random number between 0 and bound - 1.

0

Yet another solution..

public static String generatePassword(int passwordLength) {
    int asciiFirst = 33;
    int asciiLast = 126;
    Integer[] exceptions = { 34, 39, 96 };

    List<Integer> exceptionsList = Arrays.asList(exceptions);
    SecureRandom random = new SecureRandom();
    StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
    for (int i=0; i<passwordLength; i++) {
        int charIndex;
        do {
            charIndex = random.nextInt(asciiLast - asciiFirst + 1) + asciiFirst;
        }
        while (exceptionsList.contains(charIndex));

        builder.append((char) charIndex);
    }

    return builder.toString();
}
0

Also you can generate any lower or UPPER case Letters or even special chars thought data from ASCII table. For example, generate upper case letters from A (DEC 65) to Z (DEC 90):

String generateRandomStr(int min, int max, int size) {
    String result = "";
    for (int i = 0; i < size; i++) {
        result += String.valueOf((char)(new Random().nextInt((max - min) + 1) + min));
    }
    return result;
}

Generated output for generateRandomStr(65, 90, 100));:

TVLPFQJCYFXQDCQSLKUKKILKKHAUFYEXLUQFHDWNMRBIRRRWNXNNZQTINZPCTKLHGHVYWRKEOYNSOFPZBGEECFMCOKWHLHCEWLDZ
0

Here's a simple one-liner using UUIDs as the character base and being able to specify (almost) any length. (Yes, I know that using a UUID has been suggested before)

public static String randString(int length) {
    return UUID.randomUUID().toString().replace("-", "").substring(0, Math.min(length, 32)) + (length > 32 ? randString(length - 32) : "");
}
0

Efficent and short.

/**
 * Utility class for generating random Strings.
 */
public interface RandomUtil {

    int    DEF_COUNT = 20;
    Random RANDOM    = new SecureRandom();

    /**
     * Generate a password.
     *
     * @return the generated password
     */
    static String generatePassword() {
        return generate(true, true);
    }

    /**
     * Generate an activation key.
     *
     * @return the generated activation key
     */
    static String generateActivationKey() {
        return generate(false, true);
    }

    /**
     * Generate a reset key.
     *
     * @return the generated reset key
     */
    static String generateResetKey() {
        return generate(false, true);
    }

    static String generate(boolean letters, boolean numbers) {
        int
            start = ' ',
            end   = 'z' + 1,
            count = DEF_COUNT,
            gap   = end - start;
        StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder(count);
        while (count-- != 0) {
            int codePoint = RANDOM.nextInt(gap) + start;
            switch (getType(codePoint)) {
                case UNASSIGNED:
                case PRIVATE_USE:
                case SURROGATE:
                    count++;
                    continue;
            }
            int numberOfChars = charCount(codePoint);
            if (count == 0 && numberOfChars > 1) { count++; continue; }
            if (letters && isLetter(codePoint)
                || numbers && isDigit(codePoint)
                || !letters && !numbers) {
                builder.appendCodePoint(codePoint);
                if (numberOfChars == 2) count--;
            } else count++;
        }
        return builder.toString();
    }

}
-1

Random 10 letter string between upper and lower cases

StringBuilder randomString = new StringBuilder();   
Random random = new Random();
boolean alphaType = true;
int j;

for(int i = 0; i <= 9; ++i)
{
    j = (random.nextInt(25) + (alphaType == true ? 65 : 97));
    randomString.append((char)j);
    alphaType = !alphaType;
}
return randomString.toString();
  • 5
    This isn't very random (predictably alternates between upper case and lower case), and doesn't use characters '0'-'9'. – Cornstalks Sep 25 '12 at 5:45
-1
/**
    Generate a random String with maxlength random
    characters found in the ASCII table between 33
    and 122 (so it contains every lowercase / uppercase
    letters, numbers and some others characters
*/
public static String GetRandomString(int maxlength)
{
    String result = "";
    int i = 0, n = 0, min = 33, max = 122;
    while(i < maxlength)
    {
        n = (int)(Math.random() * (max - min) + min);
        if(n >= 33 && n < 123)
        {
            result += (char)n;
            ++i;
        }
    }
    return(result);
}
-2
public class RandomGenerator {
          private static SecureRandom prng;
          private static final Logger LOG = LoggerFactory
                    .getLogger(AuthTokenGenerator.class);
            static {
                try {
                    // Initialize SecureRandom
                    prng = SecureRandom.getInstance("SHA1PRNG");
                } catch (NoSuchAlgorithmException e) {
                    LOG.info("ERROR while intantiating Secure Random:   " + prng);
            }
        }
        /**
         * @return
         */
        public static String getToken() {
            try {
                LOG.info("About to Generate Token in getToken()");
                String token;
                // generate a random number
                String randomNum = Integer.toString(prng.nextInt());
                // get its digest
                MessageDigest sha = MessageDigest.getInstance("SHA-1");
                byte[] result = sha.digest(randomNum.getBytes());
                token = hexEncode(result);
                LOG.info("Token in getToken():   " + token);
                return token;
            } catch (NoSuchAlgorithmException ex) {
                return null;
            }
        }
        /**
         * @param aInput
         * @return
         */
        private static String hexEncode(byte[] aInput) {
            StringBuilder result = new StringBuilder();
            char[] digits = { '0', '1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9', 'a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'g', 'h',
                    'i', 'j', 'k', 'l', 'm', 'n', 'o', 'p', 'q', 'r', 's', 't', 'u', 'v', 'w', 'x', 'y', 'z' };
            for (byte b : aInput) {
                result.append(digits[(b & 0xf0) >> 4]);
                result.append(digits[b & 0x0f]);
            }
            return result.toString();
        }
}
-3

You can use this simple java function:

 public class GenerateRandomString {
   private static final String ALPHA_NUM =
           "0123456789ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ";
   public static void main(String[] args) {
      GenerateRandomString grs = new GenerateRandomString();
      System.out.println(grs.getAlphaNumeric(10));
      System.out.println(grs.getAlphaNumeric(20));
   }
   public String getAlphaNumeric(int len) {
      StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer(len);
      for (int i=0;  i<len;  i++) {
         int ndx = (int)(Math.random()*ALPHA_NUM.length());
         sb.append(ALPHA_NUM.charAt(ndx));
      }
      return sb.toString();
   }
}
  • 2
    How is this different in substance than the first answer given two years prior? – erickson Oct 4 '13 at 5:34
-7

You can make it the hard way:

package gaming;

import java.util.Random;

public class game2 {

public static char c;
public static Random r = new Random();
public static int i = r.nextInt(25);
public static int i2 = r.nextInt(25);
public static int i3 = r.nextInt(25);
public static int i4= r.nextInt(25);
public static int i5 = r.nextInt(25);
public static int num2 = r.nextInt(9);
public static int num3= r.nextInt(9);
public static String s1 = String.valueOf(num2);
public static String s2 = String.valueOf(num3);

public static void main(String[] args){


    System.out.print("The pin is: ");
    changeToString(i);
    System.out.print(c);
    changeToString(i2);
    System.out.print(c);
    changeToString(i3);
    System.out.print(c);
    changeToString(i4);
    System.out.print(c);
    changeToString(i5);
    System.out.print(c);
    System.out.print(s1);
    System.out.print(s2);

}

public static void changeToString(int rand){

    switch (rand){

    case 0:

        c = 'A';
        break;
    case 1:

        c = 'B';
        break;
    case 2:

        c = 'C';
        break;
    case 3:

        c = 'D';
        break;
    case 4:

        c = 'E';
        break;
    case 5:

        c = 'F';
        break;
    case 6:

        c = 'G';
        break;
    case 7:

        c = 'H';
        break;
    case 8:

        c = 'I';
        break;
    case 9:

        c = 'J';
        break;
    case 10:

        c = 'K';
        break;
    case 11:

        c = 'L';
        break;
    case 12:

        c = 'M';
        break;
    case 13:

        c = 'N';
        break;
    case 14:

        c = 'O';
        break;
    case 15:

        c = 'P';
        break;
    case 16:

        c = 'Q';
        break;
    case 17:

        c = 'R';
        break;
    case 18:

        c = 'S';
        break;
    case 19:

        c = 'T';
        break;
    case 20:

        c = 'U';
        break;
    case 21:

        c = 'V';
        break;
    case 22:

        c = 'W';
        break;
    case 23:

        c = 'X';
        break;
    case 24:

        c = 'Y';
        break;
    case 25:

        c = 'Z';
        break;

    }

}
}
  • 4
    Holy James Gosling, this is the most awful code I've seen in years. I beg you to delete this. – MD XF Apr 20 '17 at 21:44
  • Please, find job in another industry, IT is not for you. – wallycz Oct 19 '18 at 12:13

protected by Mosty Mostacho Oct 9 '13 at 19:34

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