41

Is it possible to "disable" authentication in ASP.NET Core application without changing its logic?

I have a .net website which uses an external identity server app for authentication. Anyway I would like to be able to mock the authentication when I'm developing it (ASPNETCORE_ENVIRONMENT = Development), airing access to all actions ignoring the authorization attributes.

Is it possible to do it just mocking some services in the service collection?

44

On updating to net core 3.1, the mvc AllowAnonymousFilter was not working for us any more. We found conditionally adding a custom IAuthorizationHander to be the simplest way forward to conditionally bypass auth.

eg.

/// <summary>
/// This authorisation handler will bypass all requirements
/// </summary>
public class AllowAnonymous : IAuthorizationHandler
{
    public Task HandleAsync(AuthorizationHandlerContext context)
    {
        foreach (IAuthorizationRequirement requirement in context.PendingRequirements.ToList())
            context.Succeed(requirement); //Simply pass all requirements
        
        return Task.CompletedTask;
    }
}

Then register this handler conditionally in Startup.ConfigureServices.

private readonly IWebHostEnvironment _env;
public Startup(IWebHostEnvironment env)
{
    _env = env;
}

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
  {...}

  //Allows auth to be bypassed
  if (_env.IsDevelopment())
    services.AddSingleton<IAuthorizationHandler, AllowAnonymous>();
}

Note AddAuthentication and AddAuthorization services are still registered and configured as per prod code (which is nice).

To allow our unit test to bypass auth, we added a new anonymous testbase with a startup class that added this line without any conditions. Nice and simple!

8
  • 1
    Nice :) .Net Core 3.0 IWebHostEnvironment doesnt have IsLocalDev() method but it does have IsDevelopment() -- I personally just use #if (DEBUG) directive though – Jimbo Jan 11 '20 at 18:10
  • 1
    Yeah whoops, that is an extension method we have. eg: public static bool IsLocalDev(this IWebHostEnvironment environment) => environment.IsEnvironment("LocalDev"); – Simon Hooper Jan 13 '20 at 0:30
  • 2
    This definitely helped with 3.1 upgrade. Not sure if this is a known issue? – Ambuj Feb 5 '20 at 9:41
  • 1
    The IPolicyEvaluator solution by ozzy is a better, cleaner approach. – Matt M Mar 17 '20 at 12:39
  • 1
    There's no need to use Linq and call .ToList() on context.PendingRequirements, because it is already IEnumerable, and can be iterated through by the foreach without conversion. – ErroneousFatality Oct 13 '20 at 12:32
19

In ASP.NET Core 3.x and later, you can bypass authorization in development environment by applying AllowAnonymousAttribute to your endpoints in Startup.Configure() using the WithMetadata extension method.


Example 1. Apply AllowAnonymousAttribute to controllers:

public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app, IWebHostEnvironment env)
{
    //...
    app.UseEndpoints(endpoints =>
    {
        if (env.IsDevelopment())
            endpoints.MapControllers().WithMetadata(new AllowAnonymousAttribute());
        else
            endpoints.MapControllers();
    });
}

Note that this will apply AllowAnonymousAttribute to all controllers.


Example 2. Apply AllowAnonymousAttribute to an endpoint built with MapGet():

public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app, IWebHostEnvironment env)
{
    //...
    app.UseEndpoints(endpoints =>
    {
        var hiEndpoint = endpoints
            .MapGet("/hi", async context => await context.Response.WriteAsync("Hello!"))
            .WithMetadata(new AuthorizeAttribute());
        
        if (env.IsDevelopment())
            hiEndpoint.WithMetadata(new AllowAnonymousAttribute());
    });
}

Details

endpoints, which is an instance of IEndpointRouteBuilder, has multiple Map extension methods like MapControllers() and MapGet(...) that return IEndpointConventionBuilder. WithMetadata is an extension for IEndpointConventionBuilder and can be called upon the results of those endpoints.Map methods.

AllowAnonymousAttribute's description from the docs:

Specifies that the class or method that this attribute is applied to does not require authorization.

4
  • 2
    Thank you, this is what I was looking for: disable authentication for development environment for .NET Core 3.x and WebApi. All other solutions were not working for me. – robsosno Jul 16 '20 at 12:00
  • 1
    Works with latest asp.net core as of 9/20 – Steve Macdonald Sep 24 '20 at 21:55
  • note: the best answer is the last on SO – Boppity Bop Feb 21 at 15:40
  • 1
    this should be accepted! – ihorbond Apr 23 at 16:29
18

I've found sollution for this problem on illucIT Blog.

This code must work:

if (env.IsDevelopment()) {
   services.AddMvc(opts =>
   {
      opts.Filters.Add(new AllowAnonymousFilter());
   });
} else {
   services.AddMvc();
}
3
  • 6
    This does not work in latest .net core because IHostingEnvironment is not passed to ConfigureServices – Dagrooms Feb 21 '19 at 0:33
  • 3
    @Dagrooms you can inject IHostingEnvironment to Startup constructor and use it in ConfigureServices ;) – Dmitry Pavlov Jun 14 '19 at 14:12
  • 2
    Yep, figured that out after scanning through docs, it's surprisingly hard to find good info – Dagrooms Jun 14 '19 at 14:20
15

Another solution you may want to consider is using the IPolicyEvaluator. This means that you can keep all the existing security elements.

public class DisableAuthenticationPolicyEvaluator : IPolicyEvaluator
{
    public async Task<AuthenticateResult> AuthenticateAsync(AuthorizationPolicy policy, HttpContext context)
    {
        // Always pass authentication.
        var authenticationTicket = new AuthenticationTicket(new ClaimsPrincipal(), new AuthenticationProperties(), JwtBearerDefaults.AuthenticationScheme);
        return await Task.FromResult(AuthenticateResult.Success(authenticationTicket));
    }

    public async Task<PolicyAuthorizationResult> AuthorizeAsync(AuthorizationPolicy policy, AuthenticateResult authenticationResult, HttpContext context, object resource)
    {
        // Always pass authorization
        return await Task.FromResult(PolicyAuthorizationResult.Success());
    }
}

In the Startup.cs, ensure this appears at the top of the ConfigureServices method. Eg.

    public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
    {
        if (env.IsDevelopment())
        {
            // Disable authentication and authorization.
            services.TryAddSingleton<IPolicyEvaluator, DisableAuthenticationPolicyEvaluator>();
        }
        ...

Rather than Startup.cs (and thanks to the comments below) if you are using Core 3.1 and you wish to use the WebApplicationFactory, you can do the following:

public class MyWebApplicationFactory : WebApplicationFactory<Program>
{
    protected override void ConfigureWebHost(IWebHostBuilder builder)
    {
        builder.ConfigureTestServices(services =>
        {
            // Disable Authentication.
            services.RemoveAll<IPolicyEvaluator>();
            services.AddSingleton<IPolicyEvaluator, DisableAuthenticationPolicyEvaluator>();
        });
    }
}
2
  • 1
    Best solution here and works with core 3.1. Simple, elegant, reusable. – Matt M Mar 17 '20 at 12:38
  • 2
    I had another IPolicyEvaluator injected by the prod Startup (using JWT) so I needed to services.RemoveAll<IPolicyEvaluator>(); before AddSingleton .. not using TryAddSingleton is one less import, no need to try, and as I found, TryAddSingleton will indeed not add the singleton if there is already one registered – wbit May 2 '20 at 4:50
7

It's tricky to give a detailed answer without more details on your end, but I have previously achieved this by conditionally registering:

  • the external authentication middleware
  • the global policy that requires an authenticated request

it looked something like:

public class Startup
{
    public Startup(IHostingEnvironment env)
    {
        Environment = env;
    }

    public IHostingEnvironment Environment { get; }

    public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
    {
        services.AddMvc(x =>
        {
            if (!Environment.IsDevelopment())
            {
                var authenticatedUserPolicy = new AuthorizationPolicyBuilder()
                    .RequireAuthenticatedUser()
                    .Build();

                x.Filters.Add(new AuthorizeFilter(authenticatedUserPolicy));
            }
        });
    }

    public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app, IHostingEnvironment env, ILoggerFactory loggerFactory)
    {
        app.UseStaticFiles();

        if (!Environment.IsDevelopment())
        {
            // Register external authentication middleware
        }

        app.UseMvc(routes =>
        {
            routes.MapRoute(
                name: "default",
                template: "{controller=Home}/{action=Index}/{id?}");
        });
    }
}

In my case, the authorization filter was applied globally, so every single action of the MVC app required an authenticated user.

If you have different requirements - fine-grained [Authorize] attributes on some actions - then you could probably achieve the same result by changing how the associated authorization policies are built. They could basically contain no requirements at all.

AuthorizationPolicy yourCustomPolicy = null;
if (Environment.IsDevelopment())
{
    yourCustomPolicy = new AuthorizationPolicyBuilder().Build();
}
else
{
    yourCustomPolicy = new AuthorizationPolicyBuilder()
        // chaining appropriate methods to suit your needs
        .Build();
}
3
  • It looks exactly what I'm searching for. I'll test it – fra Jan 12 '17 at 19:40
  • 1
    This solution may work with ASP.NET Core 1.x, but in ASP.NET Core 2.0, they have change the authentication pipeline. What works for me in 2.0 is this answer stackoverflow.com/a/40156927/1118893 – Shabbir Nov 2 '17 at 9:07
  • Could you let me know what you think doesn't work? I'm using this technique in ASP.NET Core 2.0 with success. – Mickaël Derriey Nov 2 '17 at 10:43

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