10

I have a question that's so simple I cannot believe I can't answer it myself. But, there you go.

I have a large-ish static list (of cities, latitudes and longitudes) that I want to use in my Windows Phone 7 Silverlight application. There are around 10,000 of them. I'd like to embed this data statically in my application and access it in an array (I need to cycle through the whole list in code pretty regularly).

What is going to be my most effective means of storing this? I'm a bit of an old school sort, so I reckoned the fastest way to do it would be:

public struct City
{
    public string name;
    public double lat;
    public double lon;
};

and then...

private City[] cc = new City[10000];

public CityDists()
{
    cc[2].name = "Lae, Papua New Guinea"; cc[2].lat = 123; cc[2].lon = 123;
    cc[3].name = "Rabaul, Papua New Guinea"; cc[3].lat = 123; cc[3].lon = 123;
    cc[4].name = "Angmagssalik, Greenland"; cc[4].lat = 123; cc[4].lon = 123;
    cc[5].name = "Angissoq, Greenland"; cc[5].lat = 123; cc[5].lon = 123;
...

However, this bums out with an "out of memory" error before the code actually gets to run (I'm assuming the code itself ended up being too much to load into memory).

Everything I read online tells me to use an XML resource or file and then to deserialise that into instances of a class. But can that really be as fast as using a struct? Won't the XML take ages to parse?

I think I'm capable of writing the code here - I'm just not sure what the best approach is to start with. I'm interested in speed of load and (more importantly) run time access more than anything.

Any help very much appreciated - first question here so I hope I haven't done anything boneheaded.

Chris

  • Hi Chris, What volume of data in total? How much memory on your system and is plenty free? I'm assuming you're testing on the emu. Also curious if you dont mind me asking what the source of the data is.. I've been looking at options for city data too. – Mick N Nov 6 '10 at 1:10
  • For reference 100k of simple XML data can be loaded from XAP using XDocument, displayed in a listbox and saved to isolated storage in 0.5sec on a 650Mhz device. – Mick N Nov 6 '10 at 1:11
  • 12
    Hi Mick - I'm using the data that came from partow.net/miscellaneous/airportdatabase/index.html. There's some junk in there that I've stripped out and I've converted the latitude and longitude into metric - if there's some way you can get in touch with me I'd be happy to share the end result (it's in an Excel spreadsheet right now). I'll look into XDocument - that sounds easily fast enough for what I'm after! – Chris Rae Nov 6 '10 at 1:16
  • Thanks for the link Chris, I'll check it out. – Mick N Nov 6 '10 at 1:23
1

If loading an xml doc from the xap works for you..

Here's a project I posted demonstrating loading of an xml doc from the XAP via XDocument/LINQ and databinding to a listbox for reference.

binding a Linq datasource to a listbox

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  • This works great, many thanks. I've finished the data cleanup and I have 3000 or so cities with latitudes and longitudes - please get in touch if you want it! – Chris Rae Nov 6 '10 at 23:11
  • yw :)... I saved the link, ty :) – Mick N Nov 7 '10 at 2:24
3

10,000 structs shouldn't run out of memory, but just to make sure, I would first try turning your struct into a class such that it uses the heap instead of the stack. There is a strong possibility that doing that will fix your out of memory errors.

An XML file stored in isolated storage might be a good way to go if your data is going to be updated even every once in a while. You could pull the cities from a web service and serialize those classes to the Application Store in isolated storage whenever they get updated.

Also, I notice in the code samples that the cc array is not declared static. If you have a few instances of CityDists, then that could also be bogging down memory as the array is getting re-created every time a new CityDists class is created. Try declaring your array as static and initializing it in the static constructor:

private static City[] cc = new City[10000];

static CityDists()
{
    cc[2].name = "Lae, Papua New Guinea"; cc[2].lat = 123; cc[2].lon = 123;
    cc[3].name = "Rabaul, Papua New Guinea"; cc[3].lat = 123; cc[3].lon = 123;
    cc[4].name = "Angmagssalik, Greenland"; cc[4].lat = 123; cc[4].lon = 123;
    cc[5].name = "Angissoq, Greenland"; cc[5].lat = 123; cc[5].lon = 123;
...
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1

If you want to avoid the XML parsing and memory overhead, you could use a plain text file for storing your data and use the .Net string tokenizer functions to parse the entries e.g. use String.Split()

You could also load the file partially to keep memory consumption low. For example, you load only k out of n lines of the file. In case you need to access a record that is outside the currently loaded k segments, load the appropriate k segments. You could either do it the old school way or even use the fancy Serialization stuff from .Net

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1

Using a file such as XML or a simple delimited file would be a better approach as others have pointed out. However can I also suggest another change to improve the use of memory.

Something like this (although the actual loading should be done using an external file):-

public struct City 
{ 
    public string name;
    public string country; 
    public double lat; 
    public double lon; 
}

private static City[] cc = new City[10000];
static CityDists()  
{
    string[] countries = new string[500];
    // Replace following with loading from a "countries" file.
    countries[0] = "Papua New Guinea";
    countries[1] = "Greenland";

    // Replace following with loading from a "cities" file.
    cc[2].name = "Lae"; cc[2].country = contries[0]; cc[2].lat = 123; cc[2].lon = 123; 
    cc[3].name = "Rabaul"; cc[3].country = countries[0]; cc[3].lat = 123; cc[3].lon = 123;             
    cc[4].name = "Angmagssalik"; cc[4].country = countries[1]; cc[4].lat = 123; cc[4].lon = 123;             
    cc[5].name = "Angissoq"; cc[5].country= countries[1]; cc[5].lat = 123; cc[5].lon = 123;             
 }

This increases the size of the structure slightly but reduces the memory used by duplicate country names signficantly.

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1

I hear your frustration. Run your code without the debugger, it should work fine. I'm loading 2 arrays in under 3 seconds, each with over 100,000 elements. Debugger reports "Out of Memory", which is simply not the case.

Oh and you are correct about the efficiency. Loading the same information from an XML file was taking over 30 seconds on the phone.

I don't know who was responding to your question but they really should stick to marketing.

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