2

This is a toy Makefile. I want to create file "a", "b", "c" as well as "a.out", "b.out", "c.out".

LIST=a b c
all: $(addsuffix .out,$(LIST))

define FUN
  in := $(1)
  out := $(1).out
  $$(in) :
        echo $(1) > $$(in)
  $$(out) : $$(in)
        echo $$(in) > $$(out)
endef
$(foreach p,$(LIST),\
  $(eval $(call FUN,$(p))))

When I test run it using "make -n", version GNU Make 4.1, the real commands executed are:

echo a > c
echo c > c.out
echo b > c
echo c > c.out
echo c > c
echo c > c.out

However, the expected outcome is:

echo a > a
echo a > a.out
echo b > b
echo b > b.out
echo c > c
echo c > c.out

Can someone help explain the behavior of Makefile or how to fix this script? Thanks.

2 Answers 2

4

Why don't you just use the $1 variable everywhere instead of creating new variables? There's no rule that says you have to use a variable in the expansion. You could just write it as:

define FUN
  $1 :
        echo $1 > $1
  $1.out : $1
        echo $1 > $1.out
endef

If you don't want to do that, you can use automatic variables like this:

define FUN
  $1 :
        echo $$@ > $$@
  $1.out : $1
        echo $$< > $$@
endef

EDIT

Without seeing some sort of realistic example it's hard to judge. The short answer to your question is no, there's no magic way to create "variable scope" inside a makefile.

You should always use $@, $<, and other automatic variables. That's what they're for. If you have other variable assignments that are needed, and you want to set them as variables instead of using the call parameters directly, you have only two choices: target-specific variables or constructed macro names.

But I don't really see the problem of "long list of target-specific variables". Why bother to set the variables globally then set them again as target-specific? If you just set them directly as target-specific variables you only have to write them once. It's not clear exactly what you find "awkward" about their use so I can't say if that's sufficient.

Also, you should set the target-specific variables on the main target, not the prerequisite, since target-specific variables are "inherited" through prerequisite lists.

So, like this:

define FUN
  $1.out : FOO = $(some complex thing)

  $1 :
        echo $$(FOO) > $$@
  $1.out : $1
        echo $$(FOO) from $$< > $$@
endef
1
  • In this simplified example, your answer works great. But for the real problem, I do hope to find a way to use variable within define ... endef without a long list of target-specific variables. Do you happen to know a solution? Thanks.
    – zhanxw
    Dec 14, 2016 at 1:55
3

Here is my attempt to answer this question and it comes with a tedious fix to the codes. The reason why I posted here is to wait for a better answer.

From GNU Make manual (https://www.gnu.org/software/make/manual/make.html#Reading-Makefiles), the target and prerequisites are immediately evaluated, and the recipe parts are deferred.

In my example, $$(out) : $$(in) are evaluated immediately. That's what I expected. But echo $$(in) > $$(out) is expanded later. At that time, $$(in) becomes c and $$(out) becomes c.out. But that's not what I want.

An awkward fix in my point of view is to use target-specific variable (https://www.gnu.org/software/make/manual/make.html#Target_002dspecific). Now the Makefile is like below:

LIST=a b c
all: $(addsuffix .out,$(LIST))

define FUN
  in := $(1)
  out := $(1).out
  $$(in) : in=$(1)
  $$(in) :
    echo $(1) > $$(in)
  $$(out) : $$(in)
    echo $$(in) > $$(out)
endef
$(foreach p,$(LIST),\
  $(eval $(call FUN,$(p))))

The target-specific variable is specified in $$(in) : in=$(1). However, when there are more than one variables in the recipe part, you will have to add multiple target-specific variables, which does not look nice.

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