Ruby has support for autovivification for hashes by passing a block to Hash.new:

hash = Hash.new { |h, k| h[k] = 42 }
hash[:foo] += 1   # => 43

I'd like to implement autovivification for structs, also. This is the best I can come up with:

Foo = Struct.new(:bar) do
  def bar
    self[:bar] ||= 42
  end
end

foo = Foo.new
foo.bar += 1   # => 43

and of course, this only autovivifies the named accessor (foo.bar), not the [] form (foo[:bar]). Is there a better way to implement autovivification for structs, in particular one that works robustly for both the foo.bar and foo[:bar] forms?

  • 1
    Your examples are not really equivalent. The hash's default proc is called because hash does not have a key :foo. The struct instance foo on the other hand does have a member :bar with an initial value of nil. – Stefan Dec 13 '16 at 9:14
  • @Stefan Thank you, that is very true. And is in fact the key to doing what I need to do: I don't need the lazy-loading aspects of autovivification, just need some fields to be set up to be non-nil. And it turns out that setting up an initialize method to set up the initial field values will do just that. Thanks again. :-) – Chris Jester-Young Dec 14 '16 at 3:26
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I would go with the following approach:

module StructVivificator
  def self.prepended(base)
    base.send(:define_method, :default_proc) do |&λ|
      instance_variable_set(:@λ, λ)
    end
  end
  def [](name)
    super || @λ && @λ.() # or more sophisticated checks
  end
end

Foo = Struct.new(:bar) do
  prepend StructVivificator
end

foo = Foo.new
foo.default_proc { 42 } # declare a `default_proc` as in Hash

foo[:bar] += 1   # => 43
foo.bar += 1     # => 44

foo.bar above calls foo[:bar] under the hood through method_missing magic, so the only thing to overwrite is a Struct#[] method.

Prepending a module makes it more robust, per-instance and in general more flexible.


The code above is just an example. To copy the behavior of Hash#default_proc one might (credits to @Stefan for comments):

module StructVivificator
  def self.prepended(base)
    raise 'Sorry, structs only!' unless base < Struct

    base.singleton_class.prepend(Module.new do
      def new(*args, &λ) # override `new` to accept block
        super(*args).tap { @λ = λ }
      end
    end)
    base.send(:define_method, :default_proc=) { |λ| @λ = λ }
    base.send(:define_method, :default_proc) { |&λ| λ ? @λ = λ : @λ }

    # override accessors (additional advantage: performance/clarity)
    base.members.each do |m|
      base.send(:define_method, m) { self[m] }
      base.send(:define_method, "#{m}=") { |value| self[m] = value }
    end
  end
  def [](name)
    super || default_proc && default_proc.(name) # or more sophisticated checks
  end
end

Now default_proc lambda will receive a name to decide how to behave in such a case.

Foo = Struct.new(:bar, :baz) do
  prepend StructVivificator
end

foo = Foo.new
foo.default_proc = ->(name) { name == :bar ? 42 : 0 }
puts foo.bar          # => 42
puts foo[:bar] += 1   # => 43
puts foo.bar += 1     # => 44
puts foo[:baz] += 1   # => 1
  • 1
    The prepended callback and send are not needed. You can define the method via def default_proc(&λ); @λ = λ; end, just like []. And you don't even need another module, defining the methods in Foo (i.e. within the struct's do ... end block) works as well. – Stefan Dec 13 '16 at 9:29
  • @Stefan yes, I know. There was base.singleton_class.send(:define_method, :new), that copies the Hash::new behavior assigning default proc. I have finally removed it for the sake of clarity. The module is needed if there is more than one struct to be vivified. Also, I still find the approach “extend in callback, declare methods in module body” more clear, but it’s definitely a matter of a taste. – Aleksei Matiushkin Dec 13 '16 at 9:34
  • And just overriding [] is not enough, if you call foo.bar first, it returns nil. You also have to override the getter method for each member. – Stefan Dec 13 '16 at 9:41
  • @Stefan thank you very much, yes, indeed, for an unknown reason foo.bar is not defined preliminary, which is weird. Updated. – Aleksei Matiushkin Dec 13 '16 at 11:09
  • @mudasobwa Thanks for your answer! I ended up going a different path (since I don't need the lazy-loading aspects, only need the values to not be nil, so I just defined an initialize method), but your answer does make a lot of sense for situations where some kind of lazy-loading is useful, and I like the module approach. – Chris Jester-Young Dec 14 '16 at 3:28

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