3

(Crossposting note: I have asked this already at the Ruby Forum one week ago, but did not get any response yet).

Here is a (very) simplified, working version of what I have so far:

# A class S with two methods, one which requires one parameter, and
# one without parameters.
class S
  def initialize(s); @ms = s; end
  def s_method1(i); puts "s_method1 #{i} #{@ms}"; end
  def s_method2; puts "s_method2 #{@ms}"; end
end

# A class T which uses S, and "associates" itself to
# one of the both methods in S, depending on how it is
# initialized. 
class T
  def initialize(s, choice=nil)
    @s = S.new(s)
    # If choice is true, associate to the one-parameter-method, otherwise
    # to the parameterless method.
    @pobj = choice ? lambda { @s.s_method1(choice) } : @s.method(:s_method2)
  end

  # Here is how I use this association
  def invoke
    @pobj.call
  end
end

In this example, depending on how T is constructed, T#invoke calls either S#s_method1 or S#S_method2, but in the case of calling S#s_method1, the parameter to s_method1 is already fixed at creation time of the T object. Hence, the following two lines,

T.new('no arguments').invoke
T.new('one argument', 12345).invoke

produce the output

s_method2 no arguments
s_method1 12345 one argument

which is exactly what I need.

Now to my question:

In the case, where choice is nil, i.e. where I want to invoke the parameterless method s_method2, I can get my callable object in an elegant way by

@s.method(:s_method2)

In the case where choice is non-nil, I had to construct a Proc object using `lambda. This not only looks clumsy, but also makes me feel a bit uncomfortable. We have a closure here, which is connected to the environment inside the initialize method, and I'm not sure whether this could cause trouble by causing memory leaks in some circumstances.

Is there an easy way to simply bind a method object (in this case @s.method(:s_method1) to a fixed argument?

My first idea was to use

@s.method(:s_method1).curry[choice]

but this does not achieve my goal. It would not return a callable Proc object, but instead actually execute s_method1 (this is not a bug, but documented behaviour).

Any other ideas of how my goal could be achieved?

3
  • Your lambda there, it is a poor man's currying. Dec 13 '16 at 9:00
  • I know, and I was hoping that there is also some rich man's currying available ;-) Dec 13 '16 at 10:02
  • 1
    Off the top of my head, I think it's the best you can get in ruby. Dec 13 '16 at 10:03
3

Saving parameters separately

This option is simple, but it might not be what you're looking for :

class T
  def initialize(s, choice=nil)
    s = S.new(s)
    @choice = choice
    @pobj = s.method(choice ? :s_method1 : :s_method2)
  end

  def invoke
    @pobj.call(*@choice)
  end
end

T.new('no arguments').invoke
T.new('one argument', 12345).invoke
#=> s_method2 no arguments
#=> s_method1 12345 one argument

Method refinements for default parameters (Ruby 2.0+)

# Allows setting default parameters for methods, after they have been defined.
module BindParameters
  refine Method do
    def default_parameters=(params)
      @default_params = params
    end

    def default_parameters
      @default_params || []
    end

    alias_method :orig_call, :call

    def call(*params)
      merged_params = params + (default_parameters[params.size..-1] || [])
      orig_call(*merged_params)
    end
  end
end

Here's an example :

def f(string)
  puts "Hello #{string}"
end

def g(a, b)
  puts "#{a} #{b}"
end

using BindParameters

f_method = method(:f)
f_method.default_parameters = %w(World)

f_method.call('user') # => Hello user
f_method.call         # => Hello World

g_method = method(:g)
g_method.default_parameters = %w(Hello World)

g_method.call                    # => Hello World
g_method.call('Goodbye')         # => Goodbye World
g_method.call('Goodbye', 'User') # => Goodbye User

Your code can be rewritten :

class T
  using BindParameters
  def initialize(s, *choice)
    s = S.new(s)
    @pobj = s.method(choice.empty? ? :s_method2 : :s_method1)
    @pobj.default_parameters = choice
  end

  def invoke
    @pobj.call
  end
end

T.new('no arguments').invoke         # => s_method2 no arguments
T.new('one argument', 12_345).invoke # => s_method1 12345 one argument

Monkey-Patching Method class (Ruby 1.9+)

If it is acceptable to patch the Method class, you could use :

class Method 
  def default_parameters=(params)
    @default_params = params
  end

  def default_parameters
    @default_params || []
  end

  alias_method :orig_call, :call

  def call(*params)
    merged_params = params + (default_parameters[params.size..-1] || [])
    orig_call(*merged_params)
  end
end

T becomes :

class T
  def initialize(s, *choice)
    s = S.new(s)
    @pobj = s.method(choice.empty? ? :s_method2 : :s_method1)
    @pobj.default_parameters = choice
  end

  def invoke
    @pobj.call
  end
end

Wrapping Method class (Ruby 1.9+)

This way is probably cleaner if you don't want to pollute Method class :

class MethodWithDefaultParameters
  attr_accessor :default_parameters
  attr_reader   :method

  def initialize(receiver, method_symbol)
    @method = receiver.public_send(:method, method_symbol)
    @default_parameters = []
  end

  def call(*params)
    merged_params = params + (default_parameters[params.size..-1] || [])
    method.call(*merged_params)
  end

  def method_missing(sym, *args)
    method.send(sym, *args)
  end
end

T becomes :

class T
  def initialize(s, *choice)
    s = S.new(s)
    @pobj = MethodWithDefaultParameters.new(s, choice.empty? ? :s_method2 : :s_method1)
    @pobj.default_parameters = choice
  end

  def invoke
    @pobj.call
  end
end

Any comment or suggestion are welcome!

3
  • I really like your approach with BindParameters (even though it wouldn't work for me right now, because I'm on Ruby 1.9.3, which doesn't have refine and using yet). While it is an overkill for the current problem, I think I could use this in other contexts as well. Dec 13 '16 at 15:04
  • 1
    Please feel free to mention any Ruby version requirements in your next question ;) I updated the answer with 2 scripts which should work with Ruby 1.9. Dec 13 '16 at 15:57
  • Thanks a lot! I like your MethodWithDefaultParameters best, because it has, IMO, the cleanest separation from other classes! Dec 14 '16 at 11:23

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.