9

Ok so I kinda know how to do this locally with a find then cp command, but don't know how to do the same remotely with scp.

So know this:

scp -vp me@server:/target/location/ /destination/dir/.

That target directory is going to be full of database backups, how can I tell it to find the latest backup, and scp that locally?

11
remote_dir=/what/ever
dst=remote-system.host.name.com
scp $dst:`ssh $dst ls -1td $remote_dir/\* | head -1` /tmp/lastmod
  • 1
    Ok that was it! Thanks – beatbreaker Nov 6 '10 at 5:56
1

Write a script on the remote side that uses find to find it and then cat to send it to stdout, then run:

ssh me@server runscript.sh > localcopy
  • So I make something like this remotely: ls -t | head -1 | cat stdout then i execute it locally with ssh me@server runscript.sh > localcopy ... then cat localcopy into a variable that gets used for the file name? – beatbreaker Nov 6 '10 at 5:14
  • No. The script looks like: cat "$(ls -t | head -n 1)", and then localcopy will have the file's contents. – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Nov 6 '10 at 5:20
  • Humm seems no need for the cat, the >> does the output. so ls -t /var/backup| head -n 1 – beatbreaker Nov 6 '10 at 5:41
  • That will print just the filename. Why not just get the file in the first place? – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Nov 6 '10 at 5:58
  • the remote server is always making new backups so the file names change constantly. I need the latest one. I ended up setting a variable for the file name like this: remote_backup=ssh $dst ls -1td $remote_dir/\* | head -1| cut -d/ -f6 I then just called in in the following:scp $dst:$remote_dir/$remote_backup $target – beatbreaker Nov 6 '10 at 10:57

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