53

I'm trying out React-Router (v4) and I'm having issues starting off the Nav to have one of the Link's be active. If I click on any of the Link tags, then the active stuff starts working. However, I'd like for Home Link to be active as soon as the app starts since that is the component that loads at the / route. Is there any way to do this?

Here is my current code:

const Router = () => (
  <BrowserRouter>
    <div>
      <Nav>
        <Link activeClassName='is-active' to='/'>Home</Link> {/* I want this to start off as active */}
        <Link activeClassName='is-active' to='/about'>About</Link>
      </Nav>

      <Match pattern='/' exactly component={Home} />
      <Match pattern='/about' exactly component={About} />
      <Miss component={NoMatch} />
    </div>
  </BrowserRouter>
)
120

<Link> no longer has the activeClassName or activeStyle properties. In react-router v4 you have to use <NavLink> if you want to do conditional styling:

const Router = () => (
  <BrowserRouter>
    <div>
      <Nav>
        <NavLink exact={true} activeClassName='is-active' to='/'>Home</NavLink>
        <NavLink activeClassName='is-active' to='/about'>About</NavLink>
      </Nav>

      <Match pattern='/' exactly component={Home} />
      <Match pattern='/about' exactly component={About} />
      <Miss component={NoMatch} />
    </div>
  </BrowserRouter>
)

I added an exact property to the home <NavLink>, I'm fairly sure that without it, the home link would always be active since / would match /about and any other pages you have.

  • I overlooked this answer today because I thought using NavLink was avoiding the problem at first glance. It is hard to find anywhere else that explains this. People need to upvote this answer because he is exactly right. you have to use NavLink. ALSO! the exact={true} is exactly right too. Otherwise the first link that renders will not re render when you click other links causing home to always be active. I wish I could upvote you 10 more times. – wuno Apr 29 '17 at 18:30
  • 2
    Just a quick note, if you are using React with Redux, you need to follow this github.com/ReactTraining/react-router/blob/master/packages/… – Petr Adam May 10 '18 at 6:52
  • In case of nested routes, you might need to use exact for the NavLink too. – Wiktor Czajkowski Jun 20 '18 at 14:19
  • 1
    Thank you for that link, @PetrAdam - was wondering why this wasn't working! (the solution is to wrap the connect call with withRouter). – Brian Burns Jul 1 '18 at 6:56
  • To avoid redux blocking a re-render you can provide the option pure: false to the connect() method. More information about a view no being updated: https://github.com/reduxjs/react-redux/blob/master/docs/troubleshooting.md – Pateta Apr 10 at 13:22
-5

I know I'm kind of late to the party, but I handle this by setting an inline style :focus {whatever your styles are} I handle most styling inline, but I'm pretty sure this will work in a regular stylesheet too. just use

:focus

instead of

:active

EDIT

I, for a few reasons (mostly embedded software), can't use css style sheets. So I've grown to love inline styling (contrary to opinion, inline styles have worked well for a project with about 8000 lines of code spanning 37 files, with no performance impact). But unfortunately, the :active selector is bugged when using it inline like this, so I use the above method.

Another way to do this, because I know inline styles are kind of frowned upon, is to make a css active class with the styles you'd like for the nav-element, and keep a state variable to track your current page as high up in scope as your comfortable with (preferably root component), and update it when user navigates to another page. This can be done by wrapping <Redirect/> or <Link to={}/> with a functional component that handles updating state and navigation, and in your navigation component, check if the nav-element your rendering matches the current page, and if so, append your active css class to it.

  • inline styling is fine, it's handwritten inlining that's usually frowned on. you can get inline styling through react style objects or you can use styled-components to get styles embedded in <style> tags in the document. either way you avoid creating stylesheets. – worc Mar 1 at 18:27
  • I'm sorry. This answer was meant as an edge case. My styles are generated on the fly from a bit mask stored on elements, selected from a predefined set of styles. Only because my requirement was it had to run on a 16 bit mcu, and node requires at least 32. I emulated the 32 and trimmed every intesive process I could. I settled on using a bit mask because it freed up my event loop by around 15%. So ya, this was an edge case, provided if needed. Thank you for the insight – Werlious May 23 at 22:51

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